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  #1  
Old 11-05-2010, 06:47 AM
BAL BAL is offline
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Wheels for an Ottrott - Rider at 210 lbs.

I have had my Ottrott for just over one year and have put about 3,000 miles on it. I love the bike and couldn't be happier with it. Wanting wheels that would have the bling factor for such a nice ride, I purchased Zipp 404's and have had no problems with the 404s. However, I see a lot of comments on the forums about the low spoke count on wheels like the 404's not being appropriate for my weight. Am I riding on borrowed time? Should I expect to experience spoke breakage soon as spokes are over stressed or the spokes fatigue given my weight? I do get some brake rub on occasion when I am pushing hard on the pedals uphill so I assume I am flexing the wheel a bit. Although most of my riding is non-hilly.

Do I need Zipp 404's? No, I don't. I am in my mid-50's and do almost all of my riding solo for fitness purposes averaging about 18 mph on typical 20 to 30 mile rides with occasional weekend or charity rides of 60+ miles.

I originally purchased the Zipp's for the bling factor with the Ottrott and I must admit I do like the look. I am ready to get another set of wheels to have a second set on hand or to be primary and I am assuming I should look into custom handbuilt wheels.

Any recommendations on wheel builders focused on riders of my weight and riding style? Any comments on wheel build configurations that might satisfy the bling factor on a set of wheels with a higher spoke count?
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  #2  
Old 11-05-2010, 07:04 AM
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Dave B Dave B is offline
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I think you would be fine. In fact most wheels save for super light climbing wheels would work. I think if you are doing crazy bunny hops or aiming for pot holes those wheels (Zipp's or whatever) would work fine. There is nothign wrong with higher spoke count wheels in the 32 or 36 three cross would be sufficeint. Just stay away from super low profile carbon rims. They probably would be OK, but I would rather stay away from OK. If you beat up on wheels then I say go with hand builts as the collective parts are easier to replace/repair.
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  #3  
Old 11-05-2010, 07:23 AM
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AngryScientist AngryScientist is offline
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doesnt zipp make a cyclocross/clyde build for the 404s and 303s? if you're worried maybe sell the set you have and look into a set of them?
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  #4  
Old 11-05-2010, 07:53 AM
oldguy00 oldguy00 is offline
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Most people I know who own Zipps have had them break at some point, regardless of body weight. Nothing personal against Zipp, just a fact.
If you are getting new wheels anyway, for a similar cost to the Zipps, you might be able to get a really nice set of Edge(Enve) custom built deep carbon wheels that will be light and built to withstand your weight.
If you are not concerned about the weight of the wheels, then there is the newer Mavic Cosmic Carbone SLR's that have been on bonktown for $999 several times lately. They would be pretty bombproof, and are really nice looking.

All that said, if you are buying your Zipps from an authorized dealer/shop, then you should have warranty coverage and have no problem getting them replaced when they break. But if you buy them off a forum, ebay, etc., no such warranty (at least I wouldn't count on it).
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  #5  
Old 11-05-2010, 08:02 AM
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oldpotatoe oldpotatoe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BAL
I have had my Ottrott for just over one year and have put about 3,000 miles on it. I love the bike and couldn't be happier with it. Wanting wheels that would have the bling factor for such a nice ride, I purchased Zipp 404's and have had no problems with the 404s. However, I see a lot of comments on the forums about the low spoke count on wheels like the 404's not being appropriate for my weight. Am I riding on borrowed time? Should I expect to experience spoke breakage soon as spokes are over stressed or the spokes fatigue given my weight? I do get some brake rub on occasion when I am pushing hard on the pedals uphill so I assume I am flexing the wheel a bit. Although most of my riding is non-hilly.

Do I need Zipp 404's? No, I don't. I am in my mid-50's and do almost all of my riding solo for fitness purposes averaging about 18 mph on typical 20 to 30 mile rides with occasional weekend or charity rides of 60+ miles.

I originally purchased the Zipp's for the bling factor with the Ottrott and I must admit I do like the look. I am ready to get another set of wheels to have a second set on hand or to be primary and I am assuming I should look into custom handbuilt wheels.

Any recommendations on wheel builders focused on riders of my weight and riding style? Any comments on wheel build configurations that might satisfy the bling factor on a set of wheels with a higher spoke count?
Any decent 'wheelbuilder', not just a guy that builds wheels, should be VERY concerned about the rider and their needs when designing a wheelset. Yes there are MO places that will build anything for anybody...I see those wrecks often, but a wheelbuilder worth his salt will 'design' the wheel to suit the needs of the rider and be reliable.

If ya gotta have bling..DT hubs, Reynolds rims, designed for you in terms of rim, tubie(I recommend that) or clincher, spoke count and type, etc. BUT remember wheels are mostly there to get you there.

OR DT rims, DT, shimano or Campagnolo hubs, built well.
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  #6  
Old 11-05-2010, 08:11 AM
fjaws fjaws is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldpotatoe
Any decent 'wheelbuilder', not just a guy that builds wheels, should be VERY concerned about the rider and their needs when designing a wheelset.

Ok, seriously..... Considering all the facts and listening to this potential customer, your recommendation for a 50+ rider, riding recreationally for fitness, is to go with Tubulars?

I think it's time to hand in your "decent wheelbuilder" ID badge.

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  #7  
Old 11-05-2010, 08:16 AM
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oldpotatoe oldpotatoe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fjaws
Ok, seriously..... Considering all the facts and listening to this potential customer, your recommendation for a 50+ rider, riding recreationally for fitness, is to go with Tubulars?

I think it's time to hand in your "decent wheelbuilder" ID badge.

If using carbon rims, the tubular is the way to go, when I suggested tubulars BUT-----

I ride tubulars everyday, I am 59 years old and the very definition of a 'recreational' cyclist. I ride Campagnolo Omega Stradas laced to C-Record freewheel hubs, 36 hole, laced 3 cross with DT comps and brass nipps, altho I have about 8 others.

Tubulars get such a bad rap. They are not a black art or smoke and mirrors. I can teach somebody how to glue tubies on w/o any mess in 10 minutes. They are FAR less messy than trying to make some wheel tubeless with the 'goop' involved with that. I do add goop to my tubulars, but even w/o it, I get very few flats..maybe 2 per year of 5000 or so miles of riding per year.

Don't want to speak for him but I think I am too conservative of a wheelbuilder for him to be my customer. I am concerned about reliability, design, fail in the 'make them blingy' arena.

Last edited by oldpotatoe; 11-05-2010 at 08:21 AM.
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  #8  
Old 11-05-2010, 08:19 AM
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William William is offline
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  #9  
Old 11-05-2010, 08:27 AM
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ergott ergott is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fjaws
Ok, seriously..... Considering all the facts and listening to this potential customer, your recommendation for a 50+ rider, riding recreationally for fitness, is to go with Tubulars?

I think it's time to hand in your "decent wheelbuilder" ID badge.

Wow. Recommending tubulars is never a bad idea. I have no clincher love.
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  #10  
Old 11-05-2010, 08:32 AM
Chad Engle Chad Engle is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ergott
Wow. Recommending tubulars is never a bad idea. I have no clincher love.

My new band name.
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bro ever wonder what it will be like long and sweet and then your gone .
ride hard and fast or slow and sweet enjoy it bro there is no practice this is it .
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  #11  
Old 11-05-2010, 08:34 AM
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oldpotatoe oldpotatoe is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ergott
Wow. Recommending tubulars is never a bad idea. I have no clincher love.
Like I said, tubulars are feared by most, most of whom have never used them, glued them on, etc...
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  #12  
Old 11-05-2010, 08:52 AM
HenryA HenryA is offline
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If standard hubs aren't blingy enough, get some DT 240 hubs laced with 32 light weight spokes to the best standard rim you can think of. That might be a DT rim or Mavic or from the talk here Kinlin. Put 25s of your choice on and ride.

I'm about the same size and I've ridden this type of wheel for many, many years with no problems. Build yourself a new set every 4 or 5 years or so. Just because you can, it won't be because you have to. Sell the old ones to someone here who will ride the rest of the very long life out of them.
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  #13  
Old 11-05-2010, 09:22 AM
oldguy00 oldguy00 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HenryA
If standard hubs aren't blingy enough, get some DT 240 hubs laced with 32 light weight spokes to the best standard rim you can think of. That might be a DT rim or Mavic or from the talk here Kinlin. Put 25s of your choice on and ride.

....
Boring!
He wouldn't be riding Zipps if he wanted a 'standard' wheel.
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  #14  
Old 11-05-2010, 09:25 AM
Z3c Z3c is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldpotatoe
Like I said, tubulars are feared by most, most of whom have never used them, glued them on, etc...
Ding! That is so on the money..

I ride tubies daily; have for many years. I don't own clinchers other than my mtb.
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  #15  
Old 11-05-2010, 10:19 AM
spartacus spartacus is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldpotatoe
If using carbon rims, the tubular is the way to go, when I suggested tubulars BUT-----

I ride tubulars everyday, I am 59 years old and the very definition of a 'recreational' cyclist. I ride Campagnolo Omega Stradas laced to C-Record freewheel hubs, 36 hole, laced 3 cross with DT comps and brass nipps, altho I have about 8 others.

Tubulars get such a bad rap. They are not a black art or smoke and mirrors. I can teach somebody how to glue tubies on w/o any mess in 10 minutes. They are FAR less messy than trying to make some wheel tubeless with the 'goop' involved with that. I do add goop to my tubulars, but even w/o it, I get very few flats..maybe 2 per year of 5000 or so miles of riding per year.

Don't want to speak for him but I think I am too conservative of a wheelbuilder for him to be my customer. I am concerned about reliability, design, fail in the 'make them blingy' arena.
What's a good source of information for 'how to' with tubulars? I've always been tempted, but...... no knowledge of how to.

What's does one do when puncturing a tubular 20 miles from home?
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