Builder's Spotlight The Paceline Forum Builder's Spotlight


Go Back   The Paceline Forum > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #31  
Old 12-23-2019, 07:49 PM
Spaghetti Legs Spaghetti Legs is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: C-Ville, VA
Posts: 1,147
Carbon fiber gets softer. Just look at this 30 year old Colnago:
Attached Images
File Type: jpg 3A641A1F-0CE6-4F22-9464-6ACCA0EB6300.jpg (118.1 KB, 243 views)
Reply With Quote
  #32  
Old 12-23-2019, 10:00 PM
Kirk007 Kirk007 is offline
formerly Landshark_98
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Bainbridge Island WA
Posts: 3,455
Boeing and Airbus wish this was true, think of how many more airplanes they could sell as they retired the old soft ones.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #33  
Old 12-25-2019, 12:56 AM
adub adub is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Posts: 541
Looking at the resale market for high end bikes I'd say the answer is a definitive "no"
Reply With Quote
  #34  
Old 12-25-2019, 04:39 AM
jimmy-moots's Avatar
jimmy-moots jimmy-moots is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: Australia
Posts: 576
I’ve put 75,000km on my 2009 Moots Compact, which I bought second hand in 2015.

I’ve rotated through a groupset and several sets of wheels but it very much rides the same now as when I bought it.
Reply With Quote
  #35  
Old 12-25-2019, 05:52 AM
CNY rider CNY rider is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hartwick NY
Posts: 4,315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kirk007 View Post
Boeing and Airbus wish this was true, think of how many more airplanes they could sell as they retired the old soft ones.

Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
Boeing’s current strategy of building new ones that fly into the ground and need to be replaced seems to have hit a few snags.
Reply With Quote
  #36  
Old 12-25-2019, 10:45 AM
steveoz steveoz is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 556
Some of my older frames are aging like a fine wine - they're collecting a thick layer of dust.....
Reply With Quote
  #37  
Old 12-25-2019, 10:51 AM
saab2000's Avatar
saab2000 saab2000 is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 9,034
Old Look 585s begin to lose their clear coat. And they’re cheap. So no, they don’t age like fine wines.
Reply With Quote
  #38  
Old 12-25-2019, 02:40 PM
Dino Suegiù Dino Suegiù is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 723
Quote:
Originally Posted by P K View Post
Ask people who race a lot (especially sprinters) and they'll say frames wear out in one season, get spongy, lose their snap/stiffness
Hmmm.
Many people are still riding 30+ year old steel frames, often hard, often daily, with no noticeable decay in all that time, as long as the frames have been maintained.


Completed in March 1989 (130 seasons now, and still going strong).
Exposed to wind, rain, snow, smog, elevators, etc, every second since.
Does not "wear out in one season", just as any decent bicycle frame does not.
Does not "age like fine wine", just as any bicycle frame does not.

Reply With Quote
  #39  
Old 12-25-2019, 07:18 PM
Seramount's Avatar
Seramount Seramount is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Austin TX
Posts: 1,904
35K+ miles on a Serotta-made Ti frame...still rides like the day I got it.

my body is deteriorating far faster than it ever will.
Reply With Quote
  #40  
Old 12-26-2019, 08:31 AM
Clancy Clancy is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Location: Texas Hill Country
Posts: 1,235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Dog View Post
This is simply not true. Metal does not get softer and carbon never does unless it is compromised and then it will fail suddenly. This is a very old myth that has no basis in reality. The science on this one is solid.
I absolutely believe this but what about joined materials? Whereas the material may not degrade, is it possible the joints (carbon) or welds (steel) weaken over repeated stresses?

And what science deduces and the body perceives are often contradictory. Perhaps the feeling of “aged wine” has to do with the body adjusting to the bike over time, muscle memory. I know my body feels immediately at home on my one main bike, the one I’ve spent many hours on. It fits me not like a glove, but a well worn and extremely comfortable glove. And then add to that how the shifting loosens up over time and how the body adjusts to the particulars of the drivetrain and steering. I can see how people developed the idea of a bicycle aging over time.

One last comment. The romance and mystery of cycling should never be underestimated. Although the scientific mind may say the individual materials are inert, who’s to say the completed bicycle is not completely without its own peculiar personality that gives it a feeling of being “alive”.

I cannot think of another machine where ones body is so connected and together can perform so smoothly and effortlessly, and even magically. Perhaps hang gliders and their pilots are also connected. So maybe our bikes do not age like fine wines. But something happens. Regardless of what that something is, I’m for one am grateful it does!
Reply With Quote
  #41  
Old 12-26-2019, 08:47 AM
XXtwindad XXtwindad is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2017
Posts: 2,392
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clancy View Post
I absolutely believe this but what about joined materials? Whereas the material may not degrade, is it possible the joints (carbon) or welds (steel) weaken over repeated stresses?

And what science deduces and the body perceives are often contradictory. Perhaps the feeling of “aged wine” has to do with the body adjusting to the bike over time, muscle memory. I know my body feels immediately at home on my one main bike, the one I’ve spent many hours on. It fits me not like a glove, but a well worn and extremely comfortable glove. And then add to that how the shifting loosens up over time and how the body adjusts to the particulars of the drivetrain and steering. I can see how people developed the idea of a bicycle aging over time.

One last comment. The romance and mystery of cycling should never be underestimated. Although the scientific mind may say the individual materials are inert, who’s to say the completed bicycle is not completely without its own peculiar personality that gives it a feeling of being “alive”.

I cannot think of another machine where ones body is so connected and together can perform so smoothly and effortlessly, and even magically. Perhaps hang gliders and their pilots are also connected. So maybe our bikes do not age like fine wines. But something happens. Regardless of what that something is, I’m for one am grateful it does!
Very erudite response. Well said.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.