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  #121  
Old 11-29-2017, 02:20 AM
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Llewellyn Llewellyn is offline
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I'm loving this. Looking forward to more...........lots more!
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  #122  
Old 11-29-2017, 04:36 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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Whoops Part 3B insert

WHOOPS. missed a part, I do all this was while doing phone calls, deliveries and neighbours with Cancer.
Part 3 B
Even though I could not ride out of sight on a dark foggy night and my sprint finish was barely detectable with modern scientific instruments, I lived with an urge, perhaps an unstable lust for frame making and racing, I kept finishing second or third until I began to wonder if I was nuts? I trained in all weather, because Sean Kelly would not hesitate to be out training in the Belgium sleet and if the others are at home warm and dry and perhaps cuddled up, I was keeping fit, getting tougher and their form would be slipping……. I did a lot of thinking when training, I think long solo rides are good for your mind, well I convinced myself that it is good thing. No strings in your ears back then, just the sound of the Sanyo Dyno Power rattling on the tyre tread while you squinted to see the pot hole with its feeble 3 watts and that is only when you were going at a decent clip downhill, while the drizzle soaked through your woollen under shirt and your feet turned to prunes, pondering the meaning of life and wondering where and what my school crush, Sonya Housman is……………………………… agh sh-t the Dyno Power is slipping on the wet tyre tread………………… (Some will know what I speak of 😊)
A period of time did come when I had my doubts. Is this frame making caper a wise career choice? All my mates were earning 3-5 times what I was earning or they were finishing Uni degrees. I pondered for some months while riding or standing at bench rebuilding a rusty gummed up Sturmy Archer 3 Speed hub for the 1578 th time, I recalled what Susan Wright who sat next to me in year 7 at primary school said, (or was it that I sat next to her?), any how she had a brain the size of a planet. One day she pretended to read my palm and she said, “you will be a pauper” Such was my ignorance I had to ask her what a pauper is?
So the moment came, when all my momentous life choices are made, probably while riding home 20kms from the shop, usually in the winter dark, most likely raining or into the howling westerly, “Susan is right, stuff it, deal with the consequences of whatever happens, I might well be a pauper via the bicycle world and worse comes to worse I will be just a bike shop owner/worker scratching a dollar here and there, so be it”. This was in the time before cycling became heavily commoditised. The tragedy of this makes you weep eh? No? Oh well, I am not making any of this up. Race now while one’s physical powers are at their best, I never wanted to race as a vet (and I never did) This leads to the moment that I can actually recall where I was standing when I thought “one day I want to design and make frame castings and have my own bike shop with the frame building out the back.” I really did have that thought go through my head. I was standing at the left end of my work bench with aching legs from the 2 hours of training before work, doing some mundane task such as rebuilding a Shimano B type coaster hub in some kid’s bike for the 4,000 th time, pondering, day dreaming and needing to sate my desire to do more frame work. My enthusiasm for the frame building, to take it further was far greater than that current situation would or could ever allow. Eric has to make the shop pay it’s way and it was toil, toil and persevere at the toil and I was there to do the tasks, chores, a wee bit of frame work and earn my wages. Eric was a good boss, I was fond of my time at Hoffy Cycles. Meanwhile I was trying to stay sane with the family home situation by shutting out everything but for training, racing, work, reading and anything frame making related while I started to expand my metal working urges via the pages of “Model Engineer” magazine. It was around this time I bought my first lathe, a little Emco Unimat that I kept on a table in my bedroom. I was starting to realise that “a lathe is a beautiful thing”.
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  #123  
Old 11-29-2017, 06:40 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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Part 7 The Llewellyn frame casting story.


Part 7 The Llewellyn frame casting story.
For many years I was making fillet brazed stems to compliment a client’s Llewellyn bike. This came about in the 90s when I was asked to make quill track stems for the trackies. We had a good and fun track racing scene in Queensland but I felt the introduction of summer crits started to demolish the track season which I was not all that pleased about. The growing MAMIL population found it easy to sit on a wheel going around some dull flat circuit that did not even have a corner in it that you had to lift a pedal for, pretending they are Robbie McEwen, compared to riding on the track which took considerable skill, fitness and race craft. (Robbie did ride track in his early days) It is hard to be just an equipment poser when racing track, you look like a real dork if you cannot ride/race the track with grace and technique. Any how I made the track stems from Chromoly tubing, machined the clamps and binders for the steel track bars on the most beautiful thing, a lathe. Chaps and lasses won many Aussie titles on Llewellyn frames and there was a couple of world junior champions as well, on their way to the Aussie national team. Then someone asked me to make a threadless stem for their new lugless Columbus Mega tubed Llewellyn road frame. Yeah, I can do that, so I then made a threadless fork stem for him and that resulted from then on in most Llewellyn frames having a matching stem perched on the fork. Then later I added a machined head spacer from aluminium to grace the set-up, rather than a stack of alloy or plastic spacers. It was a frame, fork, stem, spacer to complete the set, it all was becoming what I consider a “frame set”. It helps flesh out the order book and adds to the invoice which means you stay in business. After all, this is not my hobby, it is my chosen path of professional expression. As the first decade of 21st Century rolled on I was making an increasing number of lugged frames again. YAY! I was trying to stretch my skills with the stainless polished caper, but I began to be dissatisfied with matching up a lugged frame with a lugless stem. It did not seem right to my thinking and my aesthetic desire. I tried one of those lugged stem kits that LongShen produced, but the bar lug had issues, it was for a handle bar that needed to be 26.80 mm in diameter (which is nonsense), so I had to braze a sleeve in and then bore out to 26.00mm in the lathe to fix that. The fork clamp was only for 1” steerer tubes. The extension tube was drop shaped, which was a terrible thing to mitre and fit up for good brazing and it looked too deep for my aesthetic tastes. I made only one stem using that lugged kit. Move on said I.
Around 2003- 2004 the urge to create and produce a stem lug set that does not exist for my needs at the Llewellyn workshop bench was festering into a “need to make happen.” 20 years after that thought passed about inside my cranium “that one day I want to design and make frame castings” I started seriously going down the pathway to do this.
I will often be working away at the bench and a thought will come into the light, I have to stop and go to some scrap paper or my work diary and scribble down ideas and designs. I have done this since I was a budding artist at primary school. I was encouraged to always put it on paper before it is lost. This ingrained habit can cause the flow of some work and other tasks such as typing, posting on forums to be broken as one crams more into each working day, but it is important to me to not to lose the moment so I break the flow and sketch, scribble or make the phone call and so on. Some times I wish I kept all of these drawings and sketches, however I am not on a mission to make a legend of myself and thus keep every bit of paper of my life to regurgitate the banal details to others at a later date or for some museum. I am encouraged by others and with some hesitation on my part to tell the story of Llewellyn. Yeah, perhaps it is part of marketing as well, however I will only give a limited energy to it, because I have other metal working hobbies that scream at me to devote more and more time exploring. If I had the millions in the bank, I would stop making bike frames this afternoon as I can easily sate all my metal working desire via my model engineering projects. Anyone about who would like to Llewellyn outright ?
😊





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  #124  
Old 11-29-2017, 11:12 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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Part 8 Casting # 1 The Llewellyn Stem lug set.

Part 8 Casting # 1 The Llewellyn Stem lug set.
The sketches of my stem lug desires commenced, I had chats with Kirk Pacenti and a few others about how to go about this project and seeking a foundry to do the investment castings. I had started self-teaching myself via text books in the evenings the basics of 2D CAD drawing and I generated some 2D CAD drawings of the determining dimensions of the lugs. I also contacted investment casting foundries in Australia to consider casting the lugs however when I showed them the drawings they said it cannot be done with such thin walls at 1.20mm. I showed them bike frame lugs castings with 1.20mm walls from Taiwan. That had them standing on their batting crease as if Shane Wayne had bowled around their pads an unplayable delivery that spun and fizzed off the pitch to rattle their stumps. (think of the famous first Test delivery to Gatting) The huge amount of time this project sucked up is immense. It filled a significant part of many days and many evenings and I still had to make frames to fill the orders and earn a $ to live with and also to finance this casting folly so working weekends was required. I would have made more $ if I spent that time filling the supermarket shelves at night but of course, the motivation was to make the vision or dream folly a reality, even if it was just once in my life. It was all to be part of my journey and part of my time line. The drawings evolved and I made the decision to go off shore to Taiwan for the foundry. LongShen have been doing a large share of the steel frame building world’s casting for some time and a few of my colleagues had recently had them successfully involved with their projects. The internet made all these communications much easier than in the decades before and the sharing of info was much increased compared to the 1980’s. Crikey, the silicon chip has moved the world and bicycle frame building was a tiny part of it all.
The most important desires and features were to be
• The fork lug to fit directly onto a 1 1/8” fork steerer tube (28.6mm)
• The fork lug to also fit 1” (25.4mm) with an alloy sleeve such as the one Deda Elementi make.
• To be able to flip the fork steerer lug to get different stem rise amounts
• The handle bar lug to fit 31.8mm handle bars.
• To use a round 28.6mm extension tube for adequate strength and to match the top tube diameter.
• Easy mitring of the 28.6 diameter extension tube and easy perpendicular alignment of the handlebar axis to fork steerer axis.
• Single M6 bolt was chosen for the bar clamp, because the stem is made to length for the bespoke fitting bike and not about seeking a position off a bike shop floor size. Also the aesthetic was to be sweeter and less material required.
• Room on the lugs shore line for the builder to alter to compliment the frame’s lug shapes.
• The lugs would only be cast in stainless steel to avoid corrosion with interface of the handle bar and fork.
I fabricated a sample of the bar and fork lug from machined tube and stock material along with some brazing and shaping. These fabricated samples I still have and the picture is of them alongside the finished cast parts from Longshen.
The samples were sent to Longshen and they have a draftsperson do the working 3D drawings from the samples. The parts were complicated and a lot back and forth was required to get the design sorted. At the time I was learning a lot about the process and language and communications was troublesome but it was all sorted out, mostly with evening emails.
The first samples arrived and from August 2004 I and others have been making lugged stems with these lugs.
However I wish to remind the reader that I do not design and produce these parts or any other frame making parts to tap into a perceived market need of other frame builders. I design and produce the parts for my own in-house production first, because the parts do not exist or maybe the existing parts have shortcomings. I make my living from my hands, so to justify financing the expensive tooling, which was done by borrowing on the equity of the home I then sell the parts to other builders directly or via my agent in the UK and an agent in the USA. It takes about 3-6 years to break even on a part again after the financing interest % is calculated and then one can make a meagre return.
So I happily make stems for the 99% of the Llewellyn owners and over the years I have had many Colnago owners ask me to make a stem for them to fit to their Colnago, I tell them as Ernesto cannot supply you a decent stem to match your bike I will happily make a stem for you and I give them the quoted price, which happens to include a painted Llewellyn frame and fork














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  #125  
Old 11-29-2017, 11:29 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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Part 8B Casting #1 The Llewellyn Stem lug set

Some pics of a few stems going out the door at the world wide headquarters of Llewellyn Custom Bicycles. No chrome ZONE! Stainless steel only














Another part next week.
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  #126  
Old 11-30-2017, 04:57 PM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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that there is functional jewelry.
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  #127  
Old 12-04-2017, 04:29 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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A set of stem lugs for a 2018 build

Another Lucentezza build for some time in 2018, I like to break the the job down into smaller bites, so I did the stem lugs while listening to the Test Cricket today.











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  #128  
Old 12-11-2017, 09:39 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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Part 9 The Llewellyn Casting Story Casting design # 2 XLS The Crescendo Lug set

Part 9 The Llewellyn Casting Story
Casting design # 2
# XLS. The Crescendo Lug set. (formerly called the “Slant 6 lug set” ) Year of introduction 2004.
Llewellyn # XLS “Crescendo” sloping top tube lug set (formerly called “Slant 6”) was the world’s first sloping top tube lug set for road bikes for XL tube size (DOS) and the first Llewellyn frame lug set that I designed and produced.
In 1992 I received my first Columbus MAX tube sets and this set with its bigger than ever before diameters became popular for track riders and road riders who are big, heavy and or tall. Recently the MAX tube set has a folklore legend grow around it which surprises me as there is nothing magical about the MAX tube set. The tube set had a lot more metal and a lot more grams so it felt very firm under the pedal, however one must remember that it arrived in the era of 28.6mm down tubes and even the larger 31.7mm down tubes had only just arrived so the 35mm MAX down tube along with a larger seat and top tube coupled with larger chainstays and bigger MAX fork blades was going to give a very firm frame and this became the new “magic feeling”.
I built many road and track frames using Columbus MAX tubes but it was very troublesome to build with due to implications with the tube dimensions and shaping and also only suitable for 1” forks. It must have been late on Friday afternoon when the person designed the lugs, BB shell and fork crown for the MAX tube set. There is far too much metal along with very bad tube fits, it all looked more at home bolted onto a piece of agricultural farm machinery than part of a fine hand crafted bicycle frame. These lugs and BB shell thus required a fair amount of rectification work if you were to get acceptable results. Cutting, trimming, milling, filing to remove some grams and give a sweeter aesthetic, but after that it all worked for the stronger, bigger rider or those who desired a firm frame under the pedal
It was 2003 and Columbus had long stopped making MAX tubing and lugs and the left-over supply was finally drying up. With MAX fading I needed a replacement for the big, tall, or solid riders with all the desired features required for lugged construction in the first decade of the 21 st Century. After the enthusiasm and toil of the recently completed “Stem Lug Set” I soon started sketching again. I wanted to use a sloping top tube design for reasons of structural merit, (shorter tubes) and this can also allow the use of a taller head tube in frame designs for riders who need their handle bars higher. A bigger 36mm head tube to fit 28.6mm (1 1/8”) alloy, carbon or steel steerer forks and with XL tube diameters that are the same as MAX. The shaping of the large MAX down and top tube to fit the older smaller head tube was of negative value to the frame, however with the 36mm diameter the lug set was to have round tubes throughout which is a plus for torsional rigidity.
I settled on 6 degrees of top tube slope which is an angle that is useful but not so much as to make the frame look like a BMX bike. There was to be ample stack height on the top head lug so it could be trimmed to suit the frame design if required. The bottom head lug needed to have cast bosses for M5 gear cable adjusters with a counter bore for the adjuster spring to nestle into, so when turned it did not scrape and chip the paint off, thus helping to keep a neat and tidy appearance on the finished frame. Those old style seat binder bolts are just plain dreadful, so it will be a standard stainless steel M6 caphead bolt for the seat post binder boss. The top of the seat post binder keyhole slot was to have rounded corners to avoid digging into and damaging carbon seat posts and thus give a more gentle but secure waist type grip on the seat post. I also needed to design enough room on the lugs for reshaping of the shorelines or extra elaboration if so desired.
I studied the tube maker’s available tubes for a useful selection of tubes. To have the seat post fit directly into the Columbus 31.7 seat tube a 30.60mm seat post was required, thus avoiding dreadful sleeves. My US agent at the time and I organised the manufacture of 30.60 seat posts in the USA. I did more sketches with my shoreline inspiration coming from a Bocama lug set from the 1980’s that I had used back then. I then did the 2D CAD dimensioned drawings and LongShen again did their interpretation from my hand fabricated sample lugs to produce their 3D drawings, however there is a loss of interpretation from my samples to draftsman, then onto the tool maker and to the end result of the investment cast lug. No too bad but to my eyes it is there.
The first of these lugs castings arrived on my doorstep and to my European agent “Ceeway” and to my USA agent in late 2004.
This lug set has been a terrific success for my in-house frame building and these lugs continued to be in production and used by other builders around the world to create nice well designed bicycles. In 2017 there was the addition of an optional socket seat stay fitting seat lug (# XLS-04) but that story is to come later.












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Last edited by Dazza; 12-11-2017 at 10:13 PM.
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  #129  
Old 12-12-2017, 07:21 AM
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Quote:
so when turned it did not scrape and chip the paint off
details. details!
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  #130  
Old 12-17-2017, 11:47 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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Part 10 The Llewelly Casting Story The third Design and Form by Llewellyn casting

The third Design and Form by Llewellyn casting, Year 2005

#LL-09-318 and #LL-09-35mm down tube gear adjuster bosses. (The Little Fellas)

STI and Ergo gear/brake levers have been the norm since 1992 however for some combinations of frame designs and component selections one needs a neat and functional down tube boss for a gear cable adjuster to nestle into. For many years I was fabricating my own gear bosses from stamped chain stay bridge reinforcements along with stainless steel stock material, drilling, taping a thread and brazing together onto the down tube. This was because to my mind and eye there was nothing available that was functional or elegant but fabricating these bosses is a time consuming chore. This chore was the motivation to set my mind into motion to design and produce a new down tube gear boss. The new boss will use standard M5 gear cable adjusters (stainless steel, of course). It will have a counter bore for the adjuster spring to nestle into so when the spring is turned so the paint is kept neat. The boss needs to be easy to use in the frame construction process and have a decent amount of shoreline footprint to reduce possible stress risers on thin tubes. Remember these would most likely be placed on the thin 0.40mm section of the tube. During my previous casting projects I was finding that there was always a minor loss of interpretation from my fabricated samples and drawings to the CAD draftsman, then from the CAD drawings to the tool maker. I was motivated to learn how to directly generate the part’s 3D CAD drawing for the tool maker to use directly for the construction of the mould tools to shoot the wax pieces in the investment casting process. It was many long nights along with a considerable quantity of weekends as I worked through several text books worth of lessons with the 3D CAD program. I got to a working process with this 3D CAD tool. It was toil but it was for me to move down my time line of acquiring skills and enhancing the details and results of my work.
In early 2005 I did my first casting project that used my own 3D generated drawing. The pencil sketches that are a close reflection of my fabricated versions were followed by the 3D drawing.




This new down tube M5 gear adjuster boss I gave the nick name of “The Little Fellas”. Investment cast in stainless steel down tube.





The shore lines can be altered and the boss polished to provide a detail for some special frame sets.

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  #131  
Old 12-18-2017, 06:58 AM
soulspinner soulspinner is offline
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Originally Posted by Dazza View Post
The third Design and Form by Llewellyn casting, Year 2005

#LL-09-318 and #LL-09-35mm down tube gear adjuster bosses. (The Little Fellas)

STI and Ergo gear/brake levers have been the norm since 1992 however for some combinations of frame designs and component selections one needs a neat and functional down tube boss for a gear cable adjuster to nestle into. For many years I was fabricating my own gear bosses from stamped chain stay bridge reinforcements along with stainless steel stock material, drilling, taping a thread and brazing together onto the down tube. This was because to my mind and eye there was nothing available that was functional or elegant but fabricating these bosses is a time consuming chore. This chore was the motivation to set my mind into motion to design and produce a new down tube gear boss. The new boss will use standard M5 gear cable adjusters (stainless steel, of course). It will have a counter bore for the adjuster spring to nestle into so when the spring is turned so the paint is kept neat. The boss needs to be easy to use in the frame construction process and have a decent amount of shoreline footprint to reduce possible stress risers on thin tubes. Remember these would most likely be placed on the thin 0.40mm section of the tube. During my previous casting projects I was finding that there was always a minor loss of interpretation from my fabricated samples and drawings to the CAD draftsman, then from the CAD drawings to the tool maker. I was motivated to learn how to directly generate the part’s 3D CAD drawing for the tool maker to use directly for the construction of the mould tools to shoot the wax pieces in the investment casting process. It was many long nights along with a considerable quantity of weekends as I worked through several text books worth of lessons with the 3D CAD program. I got to a working process with this 3D CAD tool. It was toil but it was for me to move down my time line of acquiring skills and enhancing the details and results of my work.
In early 2005 I did my first casting project that used my own 3D generated drawing. The pencil sketches that are a close reflection of my fabricated versions were followed by the 3D drawing.




This new down tube M5 gear adjuster boss I gave the nick name of “The Little Fellas”. Investment cast in stainless steel down tube.





The shore lines can be altered and the boss polished to provide a detail for some special frame sets.

Wow. Awesome!
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  #132  
Old 01-03-2018, 04:33 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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Design and form by LLEWELLYN

What is he building in there ?
what is he building in there ?
And he's hiding something from the rest of us
He's all to himself, I think I know why.................










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  #133  
Old 01-03-2018, 04:43 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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Design and form by LLEWELLYN





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  #134  
Old 01-03-2018, 04:50 PM
Dazza Dazza is offline
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Design and form by LLEWELLYN

Big lugs, 46mm HT, 44mm DT
Why?
Kicks and giggles and to sate creativity needs. If you like a firm pedal under your foot and you need lugs...................










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  #135  
Old 01-03-2018, 05:52 PM
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