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  #1  
Old 08-27-2018, 05:55 PM
hotspur.serotta hotspur.serotta is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Tempe, Ariz.
Posts: 120
Saddle width

I got cardboard and tried to measure my sit bones with widely varying results (95 to 110 mm). I was sitting on a low bench, femur parallel to ground. However, I was rocking side to side to make deeper impressions.

I then modified my technique. I soaked the cardboard for ~5 minutes, then sat straight down. Two trials resulted in much greater consistency, 105 and 108 mm.

Some sites say to add 20 mm, others 25 to 30 mm, so my nominal seat width should be 125 to 135 mm? Anything I'm overlooking here?

I'm a Bontrager Position 4, Fitness, rider (see here).

Some of the suggested seats I seen recommended are these:
Brooks B17
Brooks Flyer
Rivet Cycle Works
Selle Anatomica X-Series
WTB Deva
Thoughts and suggestions welcomed!
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  #2  
Old 08-27-2018, 09:24 PM
daker13 daker13 is offline
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Location: Rhode Island
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Sounds like you're doing a good job figuring out what you'll need, but finding the right saddle is hard and many riders spend their whole lives going back and forth from one saddle to the next. With Brooks, it's hard to tell a cyclist whether it's going to work or not since saddle choice is so personal. It's more like, You should give one a try. (Brooks is what I have on my bikes, the B17 and the cambium.)

I recommend buying one of the used Brooks that pops up in the classifieds. You can probably sell it for what you paid if it doesn't work out. Based on your riding style, it sounds like a Brooks would be a good bet but you'll obviously have to spend a while dialing in the fit, seeing if it works for the lengths of rides you like to do, etc. Even the most rigorous calculations are no substitute for time in the saddle.
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  #3  
Old 08-28-2018, 08:53 AM
Alan Alan is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 746
Berthoud

If you want a leather saddle take a look at the Berthouds as they do come in various widths. I am very happy with my Aspin. Jan Heine sells them on the Compass web site. I found their quality to be very high.

https://www.compasscycle.com/shop/co...-aspin-saddle/

Use a saddle cover with whatever leather saddle you buy.

Alan
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  #4  
Old 08-29-2018, 10:25 AM
Road Fan Road Fan is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotspur.serotta View Post
I got cardboard and tried to measure my sit bones with widely varying results (95 to 110 mm). I was sitting on a low bench, femur parallel to ground. However, I was rocking side to side to make deeper impressions.

I then modified my technique. I soaked the cardboard for ~5 minutes, then sat straight down. Two trials resulted in much greater consistency, 105 and 108 mm.

Some sites say to add 20 mm, others 25 to 30 mm, so my nominal seat width should be 125 to 135 mm? Anything I'm overlooking here?

I'm a Bontrager Position 4, Fitness, rider (see here).

Some of the suggested seats I seen recommended are these:
Brooks B17
Brooks Flyer
Rivet Cycle Works
Selle Anatomica X-Series
WTB Deva
Thoughts and suggestions welcomed!
If you're going to focus on leather skin saddles with hard metal frames, I'd say your sitbones need to fit between the rigid steel cantle plate across the rear. For the Selle Anatomica (first, you don't have a range of sizes available!), the overall width is about 170 mm, and the side margin to clear the plate is about 20 to 25 mm, so that aspect of the saddle is good for sitbone width up to about 120 to 130 mm.

At least with S-A, next problem is that the mid to nose section is not narrow. For some this is a concern but not for other riders. And you can't ignore that you must manage sag as the saddle stretches to its final position, by adjusting screw tension and saddle pitch.
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  #5  
Old 09-01-2018, 01:37 PM
hotspur.serotta hotspur.serotta is offline
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Location: Tempe, Ariz.
Posts: 120
Measuring sit bones

I started this with an account of how I measured my ischial protuberosities, coming up with 105-108 mm. The other morning I met an avid cyclist and we talked for some time about my latest foray into metrics. When I mentioned the width of said sit bones he said, "Are you sure? Because I'm 140 mm." So I doubted my methodology and measurements again.

When I got home I noticed the lines on my office chair again. I bought it 14 months ago and became aware some time ago that the seat cushion has developed two distinct parallel lines, especially evident in the directional light of morning. I'm the only one who sits in that chair. On a whim I got out the meter stick: they're 110 mm apart, so my wet-cardboard methodology was correct. Next time i see that cyclist I can say, "Yes, I really am that thin!"
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  #6  
Old 11-08-2018, 09:42 AM
Road Fan Road Fan is offline
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Location: Ann Arbor, MI
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotspur.serotta View Post
I started this with an account of how I measured my ischial protuberosities, coming up with 105-108 mm. The other morning I met an avid cyclist and we talked for some time about my latest foray into metrics. When I mentioned the width of said sit bones he said, "Are you sure? Because I'm 140 mm." So I doubted my methodology and measurements again.

When I got home I noticed the lines on my office chair again. I bought it 14 months ago and became aware some time ago that the seat cushion has developed two distinct parallel lines, especially evident in the directional light of morning. I'm the only one who sits in that chair. On a whim I got out the meter stick: they're 110 mm apart, so my wet-cardboard methodology was correct. Next time i see that cyclist I can say, "Yes, I really am that thin!"
Yeah, it's your pelvic bone dimensions, not of the lard (in my case) that surrounds them.
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  #7  
Old 01-25-2019, 08:27 AM
Road Fan Road Fan is offline
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Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Posts: 110
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotspur.serotta View Post
I got cardboard and tried to measure my sit bones with widely varying results (95 to 110 mm). I was sitting on a low bench, femur parallel to ground. However, I was rocking side to side to make deeper impressions.

I then modified my technique. I soaked the cardboard for ~5 minutes, then sat straight down. Two trials resulted in much greater consistency, 105 and 108 mm.

Some sites say to add 20 mm, others 25 to 30 mm, so my nominal seat width should be 125 to 135 mm? Anything I'm overlooking here?

I'm a Bontrager Position 4, Fitness, rider (see here).

Some of the suggested seats I seen recommended are these:
Brooks B17
Brooks Flyer
Rivet Cycle Works
Selle Anatomica X-Series
WTB Deva
Thoughts and suggestions welcomed!
I don't know if you're still running down this section of the maze, but while I like Brooks and S/A, I also like Specialized saddles, especially the Toupe with gel. I used to like the Avatar, but I think they are off the market or the design is greatly changed. If you go to a good Specialized dealer they will have a pretty accurate gadget for selecting saddle width for you, based on direct measurement combined with questions about your riding style and position. I like the 143 mm widths, and that gives me about 15 mm margin at each side of the wide part of the saddle, so I can skooch around on the saddle without one sit-bone falling off the side. Also the widths at the midpoints of the saddle are pretty narrow, so I have great thigh clearance for easier spinning.

The shells of the Toupes seem to get more flexible as you move up in price point. I have an older one with a carbon shell, and it has give in it. My newer one doesn't but it has nice gel pads. But in '18 at least you don't get a carbon shell for less than $300 retail in a Toupe, but I don't want to pay $300.

In contrast, I also enjoy a vintage Ideale 92, which is wide, leather, stiff but resilient, and most likely new in 1975! It was LBS old stock when I bought it in 1984! It is a challenge to find seatposts that will give me enough setback with typical road frame seat tube angles. It's great on a UO-8, however, due to it's 71 degree seat tube angle.

Last edited by Road Fan; 01-25-2019 at 08:29 AM.
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  #8  
Old 03-16-2020, 04:14 PM
Miljack Miljack is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 33
Will a Specialized dealer measure your sit bones if you're purchasing a saddle from them? I don't use Specialized much, so don't have a LBS for them.
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  #9  
Old 03-16-2020, 06:52 PM
Peter P. Peter P. is offline
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Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Meriden CT
Posts: 5,373
My experience with measuring sit bones vs. saddles that are comfortable is:

There's no correlation between sit bone width and saddle width.

I've done the tests.

I am comfortable on saddles from 132-145mm wide. The shape matters more than the width.

Use the test as a starting point but don't use it as gospel.
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  #10  
Old 03-16-2020, 09:35 PM
l0n3rider l0n3rider is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 36
i have the same finding .. the shape matters more ..

i have tried ..
specialized - romin, romin evo, power, power arc
fizik - arione
selle italia - slr flow, slr superflow, sp-01 boost

my favourite is the latest .. sp-01 boost.

my guidance ..
if you move quite a bit during a ride .. back n forth .. try the saddle with flat top.
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  #11  
Old 03-17-2020, 03:14 PM
Smitty2k1 Smitty2k1 is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 227
Quote:
Originally Posted by l0n3rider View Post
i have the same finding .. the shape matters more ..

i have tried ..
specialized - romin, romin evo, power, power arc
fizik - arione
selle italia - slr flow, slr superflow, sp-01 boost

my favourite is the latest .. sp-01 boost.

my guidance ..
if you move quite a bit during a ride .. back n forth .. try the saddle with flat top.
Any flat top ones you suggest? I find most saddles I have to point very "nose up" otherwise I always feel like I'm sliding forward. I've also started experimenting with narrower width saddles thinking I'm sitting too much on the nose of wider saddles.
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  #12  
Old 03-17-2020, 08:17 PM
l0n3rider l0n3rider is offline
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Posts: 36
start with the ones that have channel in the middle .. selle italia superflow stuffs are good ..
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  #13  
Old 03-26-2020, 10:00 PM
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JohnnyBoston JohnnyBoston is offline
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Join Date: Sep 2019
Location: South Korea
Posts: 41
I was fitted for a 155mm saddle during a BG body fit bike fit. Basically sitting straight up on a ass meter.

I rode it for over a year but had trouble with saddle sores, no matter how finely I adjusted the fore/aft and tilt.

I had a chance to ride a friends bike that fit me almost perfectly with the same power saddle but in 143mm.

The saddle disappeared underneath me. Instantly liked it.

Since then I have had to invest in 143mm saddles. My theory is I ride with lower than average handlebars, therefore rotating my pelvis forward into a much different position that sitting straight up.

This idea was discussed in this article I read later:

https://capovelo.com/how-to-measure-...dle-selection/
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  #14  
Old 07-30-2020, 11:12 AM
520arachnid 520arachnid is offline
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Location: Tucson, Az
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Girthy saddles for the win!
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  #15  
Old 08-15-2020, 09:48 PM
Wakatel_Luum Wakatel_Luum is offline
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Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
My experience with measuring sit bones vs. saddles that are comfortable is:

There's no correlation between sit bone width and saddle width.

I've done the tests.

I am comfortable on saddles from 132-145mm wide. The shape matters more than the width.

Use the test as a starting point but don't use it as gospel.
I don't agree, I believe there is a correlation between sit bone/saddle width plus the shape of the saddle too. All three compliment each other.

But everyone is so different, which I find interesting...after all this time we have such a saturated market of saddles choices and there appears to still be so much disparity.
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