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  #31  
Old 02-18-2010, 10:39 AM
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jtferraro jtferraro is offline
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post & stem

Jim,
Lookin' good. Did you decide against the silver post & stem?
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  #32  
Old 02-18-2010, 10:51 AM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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that'll be its spring or summer wardrobe.
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  #33  
Old 02-18-2010, 06:38 PM
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SEABREEZE SEABREEZE is offline
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Those Fenders are KICK A$$
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  #34  
Old 02-23-2010, 12:38 AM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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Finally!

Cables & housing assembled, position set, etc....

Some bar tape, adding a few little tidbits, dialing in the gears and presto! Just in time for snow and slush....

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  #35  
Old 02-23-2010, 01:23 AM
Peter B Peter B is online now
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Nice! Looks like you found your Pro Vibe 7S Round. Where?
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  #36  
Old 02-23-2010, 01:28 AM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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1 bar was from a shop in the u.k., and the other (for another bike) was from my local shop, who was able to scour the attic for a straggler..

i really like the bend so far based on setting up the bike and trying things out indoors. will know more once on the road...

i'd like to get rid of most of the white graphics on the front though--too much. i might try and get 'em off with nail polish remover or something similar.

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Originally Posted by Peter B
Nice! Looks like you found your Pro Vibe 7S Round. Where?
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  #37  
Old 02-23-2010, 08:34 AM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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white tape, pure as the virgin snow...



small plumbing rubber o-ring, keeps the derail. cables nice & aligned...

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  #38  
Old 02-25-2010, 11:30 AM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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Done! Steerer is snipped, changed tape to black...now it’s time to get out there and get dirty, and with the snow currently falling en masse, that shouldn't be a problem...

Build is: DA 7800 drivetrain, Fizik Cyrano seatpost & Aliante carbon saddle, Campy seatpost clamp, CK headset, Ritchey WCS carbon/alu. stem, Shimano Pro Vibe 7s round bend alu. bars, Speedplay steel axle X-1, pedals, King ti cages, Honjo hammered 35mm fenders (w/Velo Orange lightweight 5mm brackets), Velo Orange “Grand-Cru” long reach brake calipers, wheels are Veocity Aerohead 32 spoke w/Phil Wood hubs, DA 7800 skewers & Conti Ultra Gatorskin 25c tires. Weight as pictured is 19.8lbs.

Will be back in a month or two with a ride report. Many thanks to a lot of people for their help & inspiration. It’s been fun!













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  #39  
Old 02-25-2010, 03:17 PM
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jtferraro jtferraro is offline
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Looks great

Looks great, Jim! However...I think it will look even better w/that Ultegra post and a Thomson X2 or Nitto silver stem!

Like others, I too am looking forward to seeing some dirty/ridden pics now.
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  #40  
Old 02-25-2010, 06:50 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtferraro
Looks great, Jim! However...I think it will look even better w/that Ultegra post and a Thomson X2 or Nitto silver stem!

Like others, I too am looking forward to seeing some dirty/ridden pics now.
I'd vote for silver stem and post, but as it stands, I'd take it if it were my size. Great build and love the photos in process.
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  #41  
Old 03-27-2010, 01:57 PM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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Well it’s been a month or so...here’s my ride report:

Been out in sloppy roads, rainy roads, even got caught in a couple of light snows. If you’ve never ridden a bike with full fenders in sloppy conditions, you don’t know what you’re missing. Clip-on fenders are decent and do the job for the most part, but full coverage is an entirely different ball game. I’ve come back from rides with gobs of slop underneath the fenders, yet barely a few splotches of dirt & so forth on my shoes and elsewhere on the frame.

As gorgeous as they are, the hammered Honjo fenders are a royal—and I do mean royal—pain in the ass to set up just right, but once you get there, it’s very satisfying to admire the handiwork. In total, over the course of a few weeks, I probably spent at least a half dozen hours trimming, adjusting, drinking, trimming, adjusting, cursing, etc. to get them dialed in. It’s a consistent 18mm from the Velocity Aerohead rim lip to the fender lip on both the left & right sides of each fender, and when using 25c tires, that results in 1cm of gap between the tire edge and underside of fender. I experimented with different Honjo and Velo Orange mounting brackets, and used a slice or two of trimmed leftover cork tape underneath them. When compressed, the cork tape slices became de facto super-thin washers. Side benefit of that technique is it kept the fenders from getting crushed when tightening things up, and reduces the likelihood of vibration. I swapped out the original Honjo 4mm brackets for some lighter 5mm hollow brackets from Velo Orange. Yeah, negligible weight difference, but I figured what the heck. Speaking of weight, I went a little overboard and picked up all ti hardware for mounting screws & bolts & so forth...

On the front fender, I ended up snipping off (with aluminum shears) about 3” from the front to keep it from bouncing around onto the tire, so it now sticks out about 6.5” from the front of the caliper. That’s plenty of coverage for water spray bouncing back and hitting the front of the handlebars (or your face)—the simple test is night riding and seeing the beam of light track the water spraying back up: zilch. Oh, almost forgot—I used a flat-edged file to shave off any leftover burrs from trimming the edge, and 800 grit wet-dry sandpaper to smooth things out.

Component comments: King cages—these will outlive me. Dura Ace 7800—smooth like buttah, and I’m happy to have scored a NOS 7800 crank at a good price; all the other DA components are gently used. The new Fizik seatpost looks great and is a piece of cake to set up and adjust. I’m not sure if Fizik’s machining results in the post being perhaps thousandths of an inch smaller than 27.2, but I had a bit of a problem getting it to stay in place when initially setting it up & testing it (twisting hard on the saddle). I had a Ritchey WCS carbon post on there previously, which did not slip, along with a Soul-Kozak seat clamp (which is somewhat narrow in width).. In any event, I cleaned the heck out of the seat tube, and picked up a Campy seat clamp, which is wider and “grabs” more of the seat tube itself. Presto—no more slippage. The Velo Orange Grand Cru brakes, besides looking like a stunning piece of craftsmanship, stop on a dime, modulate great, and inspire plenty of confidence. I don’t even think about ‘em when it comes to slowing down, even on steep rain-soaked roads. They work as brakes should. I did swap out the supplied stock pads to Dura Ace-compatible Kool Stop black, which made a huge difference. If you get these brakes, I’d highly recommend doing the same. Install and adjustment of the brakes was a no-brainer, and the supplied pad holders have a conical washer to allow for toe-in as needed. The quick release is smooth and has an internal ratcheting mechanism that stays put in any open position.

In terms of positioning, I set the bike up to be within a few mm here & there vs. my other bike, so it feels just like home. Very comfy, and a decent amount of drop (about 9cm). I’d like to snip off that top 5mm of spacer, but am holding out until I experiment with another stem in the future (a Thomson; will need some wiggle room on the steerer due to the different rise). One of the most noticeably-felt purchases was the 40cm Pro Vibe 7S round bend aluminum handlebars. Besides being very hard to find, these things are INCREDIBLY stiff, with a 31.8 diameter across the entire top of the bars (just before the bend at the levers). I bought another pair to put on my other bike, and the difference vs. what was on there previously (Ritchey WCS 31.8 alu.) is really something. The front end on both bikes feels like one solid piece of metal, totally connected. The round bend of the new bars is such a welcome shape; I can’t believe I put up with “ergo” bend bars all these years. It’s like coming home to the Cinelli 64’s I rode many years ago. Riding in the drops is finally comfortable again, the shifter-to-finger distance is perfect for me, and there’s a nice amount of flat bar to grip when winding it up in a sprint.

The frame: don’t know what else to say other than I’m really enjoying it. It’s plenty stiff, it’s responsive, it handles great, and it’s comfortable on long rides. It does exactly what it was designed & intended to do, which is be neutral and predictable. At speed, the bike is plenty stable and doesn’t leave me wondering about what’ll happen if there’s a sudden change in speed or other dynamic. There’s a road out of town that is kind of a test for me in terms of bike stability, with some fast off-camber corners (that can occasionally be wet), and this rig handled ‘em just fine. Climbing is straightforward—it goes uphill as fast, or slow, as I can make it go.

I was initially unsure about the fork that’s on there now, as we were originally planning on the highly-regarded Alpha Q CS25, but that company went bust at the last minute and the build plans had to change slightly (since the head tube length & angle, stack height of the CK headset, and CS25 fork crown dimensions were all accounted for in the initial design). Next option was a Wound Up, but that was going to cost much more $, and I didn’t think it would look so hot with this frame. What’s on there now is supposedly made in Utah by a company called Advanced Composites, which I think is same as Wound Up (?) and is an OEM spec fork for the Redline bike company. Regardless, it works fine and feels plenty stiff. It was also ~$100 less than the Alpha Q; definitely no complaints with that change. I have to admit, with an alu. steerer it’s nice to never worry about torquing down (to spec, of course) on a stem and hearing a crunching sound underneath…

That’s it in a nutshell. Joe at Tsunami was great to work with, clearly loves what he does, and charges a fair price for a wonderful frame. Over the course of about 3 months (from initial conversation to finally receiving the frame), plenty of pictures and updates were provided along the way. This is, incidentally, the first frame of its kind that he built, so it’s kind of unique. I’m happy I got in line back in Nov/Dec ‘09 at a little less $ before his recent price hike, but even then, it’s now starting at $650. For what you get with that (frame only) it’s a heck of a deal. Made in the U.S. by hand—doesn’t get any better than that.

Hope you enjoyed the pics & reading along as this journey unfolded, and thank you for your comments, questions and critiques. If I get a chance to snap some interesting pics in the future, I’ll post ‘em up here. Cheers & happy riding!

Last edited by 54ny77; 03-27-2010 at 02:34 PM.
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  #42  
Old 01-16-2011, 11:04 AM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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updated photos with funny white stuff in the background....





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  #43  
Old 10-04-2015, 12:59 PM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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What's old is feeling new again....haven't touched this rig in ages. Now it's seeing fall colors, and a new fork. What a world of a difference this Alpha Q fork makes. Found it used, I forget the model name but it's the one with fork eyelets.

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  #44  
Old 10-04-2015, 01:08 PM
thirdgenbird thirdgenbird is offline
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That bike is a ritchey classic post and stem away from perfection.
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  #45  
Old 10-04-2015, 09:42 PM
54ny77 54ny77 is offline
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funny you mention that. a good 4-5 years ago i used to inquire constantly of them to make a silver post and stem.

when i asked about stripping the anodization off a wcs aluminum stem (so i could polish it), they said don't do it, it could cause a structural issue. whether that's true or not i dunno, so i left it at that.

thx. for the reminder on the now "classic" ritchey lineup. i will indeed look into that. i have a nos ultegra post and a silver thomson stem i was thinking of using as well, but i like the idea of the ritchey stuff.
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