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  #1  
Old 03-10-2018, 04:01 PM
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azrider azrider is offline
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Hamstring issues

Never posted here. Not sure how much 'traffic' it gets but am looking for advice.

CatIII racer and 5000 miles year rider until two years ago when I got hit by car. I'm finally starting to put 'respectful' miles in again and I am continuing to get hamstring pain. Initially i thought it would go away after few hundred miles but I'm closing in on 1000 miles and pain is still lingering around. The pain definitely kicks in more when I'm down in drops and yes I'm stretching and rolling.

So my question: Is this simple saddle forward? Saddle lower? or combination?

Or would this have to do more with reach? (i've already moved from my old 140 stem to a 120 and added some spacers )
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Old 03-10-2018, 05:50 PM
Peter P. Peter P. is offline
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I'd experiment with your self-suggestions of seat height, fore/aft, or both.

You don't say what muscles you're currently stretching or what injuries you sustained in the crash; they might be clues for us to offer suggestions.

If self-adjustments and a stretching program don't solve your problem, a visit to a physical therapist would definitely be of use to you. Ask at your local bike shops for a recommendation to someone who treats cyclists. Don't go to just any PT that puts the word "sports" in their ads.

I don't think it's a reach issue. Typically I would expect raising your bars would alleviate your symptoms but from your position changes, it's not. That may be a clue that it's not a hamstring flexibility issue.

Personally, I'd slide the seat forward, first. I wouldn't do it as a permanent change but just to prove whether the change affects your symptoms. Be sure to give it a couple hundred miles before you conclude anything.
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Old 03-10-2018, 09:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
I'd experiment with your self-suggestions of seat height, fore/aft, or both.

You don't say what muscles you're currently stretching or what injuries you sustained in the crash; they might be clues for us to offer suggestions.

If self-adjustments and a stretching program don't solve your problem, a visit to a physical therapist would definitely be of use to you. Ask at your local bike shops for a recommendation to someone who treats cyclists. Don't go to just any PT that puts the word "sports" in their ads.

I don't think it's a reach issue. Typically I would expect raising your bars would alleviate your symptoms but from your position changes, it's not. That may be a clue that it's not a hamstring flexibility issue.

Personally, I'd slide the seat forward, first. I wouldn't do it as a permanent change but just to prove whether the change affects your symptoms. Be sure to give it a couple hundred miles before you conclude anything.
Thanks for response. Car accident resulted in grade 4 should separation, hyperextended knee, broken bones in hand, and road rash.

Muscles I'm rolling are quads, hams, glutes, and calves. I also forgot to mention that i'm uber flexible. putting palms on ground is no biggie.
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Old 03-11-2018, 09:38 AM
OtayBW OtayBW is offline
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No expert, but I would expect that any fit adjustment that permits you to vary the degree of forward pelvic rotation on the saddle might help tell you something. The reach or drop aspect could conceivably be involved in this regard. GL.
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Old 03-12-2018, 08:58 PM
belopsky belopsky is offline
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Both hamstrings or just one? Which side? Where is the pain?
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Old 03-12-2018, 09:08 PM
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Hellgate Hellgate is offline
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See a doctor, get an evaluation and a prescription to a sports focused physical therapist.

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Old 03-13-2018, 06:57 AM
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MattTuck MattTuck is offline
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Yes, a PT is probably your best bet, if they are knowledgeable about cycling.

That said, I'll give you my $0.02.

If it is only bothering you down in the drops, then that suggests a range of motion type of issue. Could be that you need to up the stretching. Could be that your accident has caused some loss of ROM, or the time off the bike.

Another option that I've struggled with, is something called hamstring dominance. If your glutes are weak and/or have become deactivated, your body can sometimes try to recruit other muscle groups to make up for the difference. If your hamstrings get pulled into the fight, they can get overworked and often feel tight afterward. They are not meant to be big generators of power the same way glutes are, so they are really not up to the task.

Hope it helps.
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Old 03-13-2018, 09:30 AM
RobJ RobJ is offline
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I totally echo Matt's comments above as well. I have extremely tight hamstrings and both the PT/stretching has helped, but have seen the issues mentioned.

I wouldn't overlook reach as a possible factor too. Hamstrings play into back issues very closely. Too long of a reach and you are stretched out tweaking your back which could radiate into the hamstrings. Or vice-versa, too short of a reach and you are all compacted in the elbows/knees, stressing the hamstrings in the wrong way.
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Old 03-13-2018, 09:31 AM
belopsky belopsky is offline
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Im going to say your hamstrings are overstretched and weak.


Stop stretching them. Only going to make it worse. Glutes and core work to bring stuff back to normal. I would bet your hips are not in neutral either
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  #10  
Old 03-13-2018, 11:15 AM
Johnnysmooth Johnnysmooth is offline
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Have had similar experience - slight touch forward with saddle resolved.
That being said, you did have an accident and you may want to do some yoga to try and isolate any tightness and work on it.
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Old 03-13-2018, 02:55 PM
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azrider azrider is offline
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Thanks gents.

It's just my right one that is tight/giving issues, not both.

And there is probably a lot of truth in 'weak hamstring' comment and the need to incorporate more glute. (even when I was racing i was told my glutes were weak)

But what I have going on warrants an (updated) bike fit and am scheduled with Pariac at Cyclologic of Scottsdale. Same Pariac who used to be in-house fitter for Serotta.

I'll report back!!
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Old 03-21-2018, 07:39 AM
pbarry pbarry is offline
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You mentioned rolling, but that hamstring might need deeper work, like with a tennis or other ball. Rubbing across the muscle may help. Heat on the hamstring before a ride and Ice after a workout. With all that happened in your crash, there had to be a fair bit of soft tissue damage and resulting scar tissue. JMO Good to hear you're back out there.
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Old 03-28-2018, 11:18 AM
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azrider azrider is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pbarry View Post
You mentioned rolling, but that hamstring might need deeper work, like with a tennis or other ball. Rubbing across the muscle may help. Heat on the hamstring before a ride and Ice after a workout. With all that happened in your crash, there had to be a fair bit of soft tissue damage and resulting scar tissue. JMO Good to hear you're back out there.
Thanks! Been long road back but nice to be back and CONSISTENT again. I'll definitely try the tennis ball technique.
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Old 03-28-2018, 11:54 AM
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Wow. So had my fitting yesterday and I am blown away. I've been 'fit' 2 or 3 times in the past but it's been a good 5 years since my last fitment. In the time since I: got hit by car, broke a leg, and was mostly sedentary for 2017 so I thought fitting was in order.

First off. I'm data/technology geek so when I saw the lazers and computers and tracking stickers I was amped. But for the first 30+ minutes I was poked, stretched, questioned, and observed. He also checked out my bibs (rubbing on inside right crotch) and looked at wear patterns on my footbeds (major toe curling on right and none on left with more wear under ball of foot). He made a few assumptions before I even got on the bike which were all confirmed halfway through the session. That to me was most impressive.

Anyway.....then came the technology and gadgets.

Holy cow. I opted for pressure test which involves putting a cover over the saddle to see where most pressure is being applied. Turns out my left 'sit bone' wasn't even making contact with the saddle!! So I went from 143 to 155 saddle and holy crap that made a huge difference.

Also learned that my saddle height was "disastrously" low compared to where it should be. He explained pedal stroke and power and showed me that opening my hips and extending my leg would buy me several watts immediately (among other benefits).

While he raised the saddle he also moved it forward to bring me more "into the bike" instead of primarily being off the back.

Also went from a 120 stem to a 140!!!! (back when I was racing every weekend I ran a 140 but have since dialed it back from 140>130>120 (why I don't know). But turns out this is what best fits my 6'1.5" frame with looong torso and shorter legs.

Then it was onto the pedals and shoes. Way too much float and my footbeds should have probably been thrown out the window years ago.

Lastly, and probably most crazy, was that he recommended I be on a 60. I've ridden 58 my entire life. The other difficult thing he said I'll encounter, is the need for longer top tube but HT in 170-175 range. That will be hard to find on a 60cm frame.

At end of the day he said that there are more things he'd like to change but didn't want to do too much too soon. I'll have a follow up with him in a few months but for now I'm extremely glad I went to go see him and am excited to get out and see how new setup feels.

Thanks to everyone who contributed and helped out.
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Old 03-28-2018, 04:27 PM
OtayBW OtayBW is offline
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^ The question I have is how is your fore-aft weight distribution now that you've raised up your saddle and moved it forward (by how much?) and extended your stem length by ~3/4 in? Did the setback stay the same after the saddle corrections? So, what's the upshot? How does it feel? Curious...
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