Builder's Spotlight The Paceline Forum Builder's Spotlight


Go Back   The Paceline Forum > Bike Fit

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-23-2017, 07:56 PM
SolidSnake03's Avatar
SolidSnake03 SolidSnake03 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 517
Measuring Saddle Height

Hey all,

So I recently had this discussion with a friend about how saddle height is commonly measured/reported and if there actually is a right way to do it. The discussion ranged from measuring:
-From the middle of the saddle (on the top side of the cover) to the ground
-From the top of the saddle to the middle of the BB along the seat tube
-From the top of the saddle in the area that you actually sit to the middle of the BB along seatube
-From the top of the saddle (most rearward point) to the middle of BB along the seatube
-From the nose of saddle straight down to imaginary line through the BB

So that all said is there really a right way and a way that people tend to default to?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-23-2017, 08:30 PM
ultraman6970 ultraman6970 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 19,302
check out lemond and pretty much thats what everybody uses because is the simplest one.

But if you want to use another one as long as you use the same contact points and a fix point all the time at the time to move the measurement to another bike it wont make any difference.

Forgot this... you cant use the the ground because some bikes have the BB higher or lower resulting in the wrong numbers.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-24-2017, 04:35 PM
OtayBW OtayBW is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: NoBaltoCo
Posts: 3,990
Quote:
Originally Posted by SolidSnake03 View Post
Hey all,

So I recently had this discussion with a friend about how saddle height is commonly measured/reported and if there actually is a right way to do it. The discussion ranged from measuring:
-From the middle of the saddle (on the top side of the cover) to the ground
-From the top of the saddle to the middle of the BB along the seat tube
-From the top of the saddle in the area that you actually sit to the middle of the BB along seatube
-From the top of the saddle (most rearward point) to the middle of BB along the seatube
-From the nose of saddle straight down to imaginary line through the BB

So that all said is there really a right way and a way that people tend to default to?
Depends on what you want to get out of it.
For comparing apples to apples saddle height one bike to the next, I go top of saddle where it intersects the ST to BB ctr along the ST. If I want to know how much (handlebar) drop there is, I measure top of saddle to ground, and then bar top at ctr to ground.
__________________
“A bicycle is not a sofa”
-- Dario Pegoretti
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-24-2017, 11:27 PM
pdmtong's Avatar
pdmtong pdmtong is offline
v a n i l l a
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 8,079
Center BB parallel to ST (since I run 7.5-8.0cm setback) to top of saddle parallax accounted for.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-25-2017, 06:34 AM
fa63's Avatar
fa63 fa63 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1,996
I measure from the pedal to the top of the saddle along the seat tube to factor in the crank length.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-25-2017, 06:12 PM
SolidSnake03's Avatar
SolidSnake03 SolidSnake03 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 517
Getting a couple different answers here, I like that since it lends support to the idea that there isn't so much a right way but as long as you are consistent with how you do it it should work ok.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-25-2017, 08:24 PM
elliott elliott is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Chicago
Posts: 515
I work with multiple custom builders and bike fitters. The "standard" seems to be from top of saddle, inline with the seat tube, to the center of BB.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-25-2017, 08:44 PM
rustychisel rustychisel is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Adelaide
Posts: 2,605
Quote:
Originally Posted by fa63 View Post
I measure from the pedal to the top of the saddle along the seat tube to factor in the crank length.
This. top of saddle to centre of pedal spindle, parallel to seat tube.
__________________
'Everybody's got to believe in something. I believe I'll have another beer.' -- W. C. Fields
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-26-2017, 08:12 PM
Wilkinson4 Wilkinson4 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 1,990
It gets tricky if you have different bikes with different saddles, shoes, etc... I will usually measure from the pedal spindle center to the saddle where my sit bones come in contact.

You would be surprised at some differences when running different saddles. I have seen as much as 1cm on a saddle with a deep hammock.

I have also measured from shoe foot bed when clipped in to saddle sit bones location when replication positions from bike to bike.

Mike
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-26-2017, 08:17 PM
jtakeda jtakeda is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: The Town
Posts: 3,712
I do top of saddle along the ST to the center of the bb.

I run two different length cranks on different bikes so it helps keep it a little more simple.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-27-2017, 08:03 AM
Mzilliox Mzilliox is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Southern OR
Posts: 3,910
Quote:
Originally Posted by elliott View Post
I work with multiple custom builders and bike fitters. The "standard" seems to be from top of saddle, inline with the seat tube, to the center of BB.
this, how can it be any easier
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 11-02-2017, 12:55 AM
Kontact Kontact is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sunny Seattle
Posts: 2,749
Sit bone contact point to center of BB. The angle is only approximately the same as the seat tube, because ST angles vary. Correct set back will provide the angle correction. That's the way custom makers and fitters do it.

Rear of saddle, nose of saddle, ground are all essentially random points because of variations in saddles and frames.
__________________
Get off your junk: www.kontactbike.com
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 01-08-2018, 03:32 PM
audiojan audiojan is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Greater Pittsburgh
Posts: 87
Here's how I've always measured it... center bb to center saddle rail at the center of the saddle clamp plus the center of saddle rail in a vertical like to top of saddle measured at the center of the saddle clamp. When changing saddles, I set the saddle nose at the same distance to the center of the handlebars at a vertical line.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 01-08-2018, 03:40 PM
Kontact Kontact is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Sunny Seattle
Posts: 2,749
Quote:
Originally Posted by audiojan View Post
Here's how I've always measured it... center bb to center saddle rail at the center of the saddle clamp plus the center of saddle rail in a vertical like to top of saddle measured at the center of the saddle clamp. When changing saddles, I set the saddle nose at the same distance to the center of the handlebars at a vertical line.
Given that the saddle rails are angled compared to the saddle top, your method sounds like it introduces a lot more imprecision through complication than just measuring to the top of the saddle.
__________________
Get off your junk: www.kontactbike.com
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 04-07-2018, 10:46 PM
smokersteve smokersteve is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2018
Posts: 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by fa63 View Post
I measure from the pedal to the top of the saddle along the seat tube to factor in the crank length.
That's how I do it since some of my bikes have different length cranks
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:50 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.