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  #1  
Old 02-06-2018, 11:26 AM
moonhoo moonhoo is online now
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Is a sore neck the sign of too long a reach?

Occasionally after a long ride I'll find that the back of the neck is sore or tired.

I'm aware that, while riding, sometimes there's bend in the back when I adopt a more upright "look-up-and-look-around" position.

When I'm paying attention, I'll stick to a more aero position and look up with my eyes more than my neck.

All that said, there's less of a bend altogether on my upright bike, the one that has a shorter reach than the other.

Which leads me to think — is my longer bike (which has a longer reach by about 1.5 cm) possibly too long for me?
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Old 02-06-2018, 04:23 PM
dave thompson dave thompson is offline
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Another possibility is that, for whatever reason, you’re hunching your shoulders which can cause pain at the base of your neck.
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Old 02-06-2018, 05:39 PM
rustychisel rustychisel is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave thompson View Post
Another possibility is that, for whatever reason, you’re hunching your shoulders which can cause pain at the base of your neck.
Agree. One of the most common is wearing a helmet with a peak (such as MTB) on a road bike. To see forward requires hunching...
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Old 02-20-2018, 12:21 PM
btanner btanner is offline
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In general (and obviously), any sore muscle is due to strain. A sore neck is most likely due to a number of factors instead of just a position that's too long or too low. Lack of fitness associated with early season could also be a contributor. Assuming the horizontal distance is correct, raise your bars to relieve stress on the back of your neck.
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Old 02-20-2018, 05:23 PM
sailorboy sailorboy is offline
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another consideration...

How old are you, and have you had any previous significant trauma to your neck? e.g. whiplash. If you are over 45 you are in prime time for starting to develop arthritis up there.
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  #6  
Old 02-20-2018, 05:40 PM
dbnm dbnm is online now
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I have the same issue. I've done stretching, strength training, reduced the weight of my helmet, etc.

Try to rotate your neck and shoulders as must as possible. That helps me.

Also, have you been fitted?

Last edited by dbnm; 02-20-2018 at 05:42 PM.
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  #7  
Old 02-20-2018, 06:39 PM
ultraman6970 ultraman6970 is offline
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Lower the saddle like 3 mm.
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Old 02-21-2018, 03:05 PM
Alan Alan is offline
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Strengthen neck and back muscles

I had some similar issues and did the neck and upper back exercises in the book linked below. Within a few weeks I felt much better.

The book is a great reference for cyclists who try to self diagnose.

http://www.humankinetics.com/product...ycling-anatomy

Alan
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  #9  
Old 03-13-2018, 11:13 AM
Johnnysmooth Johnnysmooth is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btanner View Post
In general (and obviously), any sore muscle is due to strain. A sore neck is most likely due to a number of factors instead of just a position that's too long or too low. Lack of fitness associated with early season could also be a contributor. Assuming the horizontal distance is correct, raise your bars to relieve stress on the back of your neck.
Often experience this early in season and more it is more a lack of fitness (core muscles) and form (keeping shoulders relaxed, light touch on bars, etc.)
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  #10  
Old 05-07-2018, 02:30 PM
2000m2 2000m2 is offline
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I've had a similar problem. One way to rule out the question would be to try a shorter stem or angled & shorter stem. This was recommended to me after going for a professional fitting.
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  #11  
Old 05-08-2018, 11:29 AM
benb benb is offline
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Originally Posted by ultraman6970 View Post
Lower the saddle like 3 mm.
I wouldn't do this without being sure.

Doing that will make it seem like your bars are higher but it will close down the hip angle which can do some strange things to your back which can cascade up to your neck.

This kind of thing can be caused by the saddle too far down and/or back for the bar position. The saddle too far back has the double whammy of lengthening the reach and closing down the hip angle too much causing your back to flex.

As soon as you start flexing your spine to handle the saddle being too low/far back you've know got your upper back facing more downward and you have to compensate by flexing your neck more.

If the saddle is down and back the bars need to come/back more. Otherwise if the saddle is too far back/down moving it up/forward gets rid of the hip interference problems and straightens out your spine so you don't have to lift your neck as much. (Of course the bars may need to move forward and/or down at that point too!)

If you need to keep the saddle down/back then the bars would need to come back/up till your spine is straight again.

I've run into this when the fitter moved my saddle down/back trying to take weight off my hands. They ended up flexing my back to the point my core gave out and I had all the weight on my hands again + had trouble with my neck. It was a total 180 degree wrong approach to solving the problem.
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  #12  
Old 05-27-2018, 03:16 PM
dasein dasein is offline
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1 extra cm drop (or more)

Makes my neck hurt in the same area as your does. If my drop is 8cm, I'm good. At 9, my neck aches. But, the other advice you've gotten is certainly worth considering
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