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  #31  
Old 11-25-2015, 09:45 AM
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looking good so far!
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  #32  
Old 11-25-2015, 09:58 AM
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Originally Posted by AngryScientist View Post
looking good so far!
Thank you angry pal for your encouragement... I am following Roger Musson's online wheel building book which I think it's just a tab easier to read and follow than Sheldon's. But Roger "requires" that I dismantle the whole thing after I completed the first time of lacing and do it again on my own without instructions...blindfolded!

So... that's what I am gonna do when i come back after a short break.
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  #33  
Old 11-25-2015, 10:21 AM
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Ha!

I actually built my first set of wheels before completing my first D2R2, so it was a good test of their integrity. Happy to report no issues. I've built myself several sets since then, and rather enjoy the process. Put some good music on, pour a good drink and relax with a soothing, repetitious mechanical activity. bueno!
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  #34  
Old 11-25-2015, 10:37 AM
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Yessir... There's no better proving ground than d2r2... If it fails, it will fail spectacularly

Good job there, scientist pal.

Anyone wants to share a lifetime supply of boiled linseed oil with me?
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  #35  
Old 11-25-2015, 10:41 AM
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i only boil my own.

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  #36  
Old 11-25-2015, 11:07 AM
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i only boil my own.

Until I saw him at D2R2, this is exactly how I imagined AngryScientist.
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  #37  
Old 11-25-2015, 11:17 AM
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Angry pal, I like your meth lab setup...

In my entire arsenal of wheel building tools (spoke wrench, tensiometer, dish, truing stand), this by far is the most useful and esteemed above all else...
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  #38  
Old 11-26-2015, 08:13 PM
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Done.





First "rear" build completed.
Pacenti SL23 (new version) 32h
Shimano 5800 hub
Sapim Straight 14g
Brass nipple

-------------------------------------

Reflections:

- Make small...incremental changes, check again.
- Strive for equal tension same side
- Keep stress-relieving spokes throughout
- Break it down "section by section" and tackle one at a time
- Take your time, don't rush, come back to it, be patient
- Better to do it right...slowly, then to mess things up in a rush and spend more time fixing later
- Choose quality rim to build
- Get good coach/mentor (OldPotatoe, ergott, Peter P)

I followed Roger Musson's book and it was really easy. (www.wheelpro.co.uk)

Found this quote from his book to be very true:

"The rim is flat and round to start with and by tightening all the spokes equally it will remain flat and round with the hub central in the wheel and with all the spokes at a similar tension, and if we get our spoke lengths correct then the dish will be very close too. Then all that is required is a bit of fine tuning to finish the wheel."

Lastly....it's really not that hard, if you are thinking about it, you should definitely go for it!

Last edited by weisan; 11-26-2015 at 10:29 PM.
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  #39  
Old 11-27-2015, 06:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weisan View Post




First "rear" build completed.
Pacenti SL23 (new version) 32h
Shimano 5800 hub
Sapim Straight 14g
Brass nipple

-------------------------------------

Reflections:

- Make small...incremental changes, check again.
- Strive for equal tension same side
- Keep stress-relieving spokes throughout
- Break it down "section by section" and tackle one at a time
- Take your time, don't rush, come back to it, be patient
- Better to do it right...slowly, then to mess things up in a rush and spend more time fixing later
- Choose quality rim to build
- Get good coach/mentor (OldPotatoe, ergott, Peter P)

I followed Roger Musson's book and it was really easy. (www.wheelpro.co.uk)

Found this quote from his book to be very true:

"The rim is flat and round to start with and by tightening all the spokes equally it will remain flat and round with the hub central in the wheel and with all the spokes at a similar tension, and if we get our spoke lengths correct then the dish will be very close too. Then all that is required is a bit of fine tuning to finish the wheel."

Lastly....it's really not that hard, if you are thinking about it, you should definitely go for it!
Good for you. Those of us that build a lot of wheels started this way too. One at a time, our own first.

Way correct..on a high end rim, that's flat and round, all you are really doing is 'centering the hub'.

Now, after a while, to test your mettle with wheelbuilding..use an old hub, used, light, tubular rim(like Fiamme Yellow-DOH), thin spokes and not enough of them..
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  #40  
Old 11-27-2015, 07:03 AM
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Thank you old-pal. For those of you who are not aware, old pal has been mentoring me behind the scenes...

I am excited and ready for more...I really enjoy the whole process.

So I got one more build (28h) that I want to complete in the next few days.

But I am already shopping for rims to take advantage of some of the online sales that are going on. This will go on Shimano 6800 rear hub.

Which one would you pick if this is your build?

1) H Plus Son Archetype

2) HED C2

3) Pacenti (again?)

4) Others: suggestion
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  #41  
Old 11-27-2015, 07:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weisan View Post
Thank you old-pal. For those of you who are not aware, old pal has been mentoring me behind the scenes...

I am excited and ready for more...I really enjoy the whole process.

So I got one more build (28h) that I want to complete in the next few days.

But I am already shopping for rims to take advantage of some of the online sales that are going on. This will go on Shimano 6800 rear hub.

Which one would you pick if this is your build?

1) H Plus Son Archetype

2) HED C2

3) Pacenti (again?)

4) Others: suggestion
I like H+Son, Pacenti, Velocity rims(A23, OC rear) and DT440(also OC rear)

My favorite is DT. Flat-est/roundest rims I have ever built.

HEDs build well, have a great rep but I don't understand why they are so expensive.
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  #42  
Old 11-27-2015, 07:14 AM
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DT Swiss RR440 Asymmetric 700c 32h Black
Bikewagon after discount: $94

HED Belgium Series C2 700c Rim
Art's Cyclery: $105
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  #43  
Old 11-27-2015, 07:19 AM
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Originally Posted by weisan View Post
DT Swiss RR440 Asymmetric 700c 32h Black
Bikewagon after discount: $94

HED Belgium Series C2 700c Rim
Art's Cyclery: $105
I would choose the DT. Swiss made precision. $94 great price...wholesale they are only about $20 less. Nothing wrong with Asian rims(H+Son excellent).
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  #44  
Old 11-27-2015, 07:32 AM
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as always, found this excellent review from my pal 22.8/2 in another thread...

http://forums.thepaceline.net/showpo...2&postcount=28

Quote:
Originally Posted by 11.4 View Post
I've got all three -- 440 OC's, Archetypes, and C2's -- and like 'em all. The C2's seem to be a little more durable than the Archetypes and especially on disc brake wheels I like the C2 non-machined finish better than the hard anodized Archetype, but that's an aesthetic issue. The C2's are the only rims I've not seen cratered. The older DT's seemed to be a little softer alloy and dented a little more easily, but with the newer generation like the 440 OC's, that seems to have been fixed. And now their alloy sidewalls outlast practically anything else except possibly the HED's. I do notice some difference between the narrower 440 OC's and the wider C2's, but you see it mostly when turning, sprinting, or descending because the wider rim helps stabilize the sidewall profile of the tire. If you are mostly riding straight-line training or group rides, don't expect the extra width to amount to much. On the other hand, if you really need a stronger wheel, I found I built the C2's optimally to a higher tension than what the Archetypes favored, and the 440 OC's built completely differently at a lower tension to a much more even build. If I wanted the best wheel build, it would be the 440 OC's. If I wanted the best race wheel or wheel for serious lateral stresses, it would be the C2. The Archetypes would miss out by a relatively small margin. If it came down to a much lower price, I'd buy the Archetypes, but they are the only rim where I've actually worn (on the hard anodized Archetypes) the sidewalls to where they needed replacement. That just speaks to shorter lifetime and the small potential for a failure if I weren't attentive to replacing components as needed. I'm riding a pair of Pacenti's now and liking them, but don't have enough data on them. I did ride a pair of A23's for a brief while and really didn't like them for their soft alloy and because they didn't build up anywhere near as well as the other rims discussed here.
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  #45  
Old 11-27-2015, 07:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by weisan View Post
DT Swiss RR440 Asymmetric 700c 32h Black
Bikewagon after discount: $94

HED Belgium Series C2 700c Rim
Art's Cyclery: $105
Corrected myself...Art's offered 10% discount, which comes up to be the same as DT - $94.

Curious to try HED, so going with that this time around...saving DT for the next build.

Oh, and I forgot to mention one other thing that I learned from this wheel building process is.....the more I understand how good quality wheels are put together, the less inclined I am to buy proprietary, boutique, lightweight or low spoke count wheels....
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