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  #1291  
Old 03-20-2019, 11:32 PM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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Originally Posted by AngryScientist View Post
Also, and I hope you dont mind the conversation here, as I always learn something new when I ask a question...

This photo you just posted surprises me a bit. This obviously shows the chainstay brazed to the dropout but not yet the seatstay. but the finish work appears to be complete on the first joint. I would have guessed you would have done the initial braze work on both dropout joints, then finished them.

i'm sure there is a method to the process, any comments there Dave?
Great question.

Frame building is really the hooking together of small things first to make medium sized things and then taking those medium sized things and hooking them together to make big bike sized things.

Most often these are called 'subassemblies' and in this case I've used a jig to precisely braze the dropout to the chainstay. It's done this way for a few reasons.....one is that it's super easy to braze this well when all the other stuff isn't in the way.....and the other is that one can then cut the dropout/stay combo perfectly to length and this keeps any heat distortion from messing with the final length.

And once it's brazed it's so simple to do the finish work on this joint without all the other stuff in the way that it's a real time saver so it would be silly to wait until it's all together.

Quite a few things are done this way.....the front drops are brazed into the fork blades and finished before they are brazed into the crown. The crown is brazed to the steerer and the brake hole is drilled and the crown race seat is machined before the blade/drop combo is added. The front triangle is brazed and finished and aligned and then the stay/drop combo is added.

In the end it's almost always easier to work on small stuff on your bench than it is to work with a full sized frame that you have trouble reaching over and around. Getting as much done when the parts are small helps a lot. This is especially true when building tandems.

Does that make sense?

dave
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  #1292  
Old 03-21-2019, 12:42 AM
Clean39T Clean39T is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Kirk View Post
Great question.

Frame building is really the hooking together of small things first to make medium sized things and then taking those medium sized things and hooking them together to make big bike sized things.

Most often these are called 'subassemblies' and in this case I've used a jig to precisely braze the dropout to the chainstay. It's done this way for a few reasons.....one is that it's super easy to braze this well when all the other stuff isn't in the way.....and the other is that one can then cut the dropout/stay combo perfectly to length and this keeps any heat distortion from messing with the final length.

And once it's brazed it's so simple to do the finish work on this joint without all the other stuff in the way that it's a real time saver so it would be silly to wait until it's all together.

Quite a few things are done this way.....the front drops are brazed into the fork blades and finished before they are brazed into the crown. The crown is brazed to the steerer and the brake hole is drilled and the crown race seat is machined before the blade/drop combo is added. The front triangle is brazed and finished and aligned and then the stay/drop combo is added.

In the end it's almost always easier to work on small stuff on your bench than it is to work with a full sized frame that you have trouble reaching over and around. Getting as much done when the parts are small helps a lot. This is especially true when building tandems.

Does that make sense?

dave
I feel like we just got a master-class in how to do life - business, keeping an orderly home, whatever. It reminds me of how the most respected chefs approach mise-en-place - nothing is unimportant, no process so small that it isn't worth scrutinizing and perfecting.

Last edited by Clean39T; 03-21-2019 at 10:37 AM.
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  #1293  
Old 03-22-2019, 09:46 AM
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AngryScientist AngryScientist is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Kirk View Post

Does that make sense?

dave
Sure does Dave, thanks again for the thoughtful response.
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  #1294  
Old 03-22-2019, 08:15 PM
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pdmtong pdmtong is offline
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Thanks Dave...your insights remind me that being a professional is not doing one weld or frame great...it's doing multiple welds and frames great again and again and efficiently.

10 years for the JKS? wow..I remember when you introduced it.
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  #1295  
Old 03-23-2019, 08:12 AM
soulspinner soulspinner is offline
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Cool
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  #1296  
Old 03-26-2019, 01:30 PM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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A steel fork built for a Kirk customer and fan of Dario Pegoretti's work to replace the carbon Falz fork his Peg came with.

Now he'll have the full steel ride.

dave

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  #1297  
Old 03-29-2019, 09:45 AM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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Well it's once again Friday and as some have tagged it it's #filletfriday. This is the very first prototype for the Gothic Fillet design I built a few years back. Figuring out a way to make the webbed fillet shape in an efficient way that was a good idea from a structural standpoint and so that it looked like what I'd had in my mind's eye for so long was a challenge but it was worth it. I think it's still such a wonderful shape.

dave

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  #1298  
Old 03-29-2019, 11:14 AM
bob heinatz bob heinatz is offline
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Incredible work Dave. Are you hinting that this could be a regular offering in your lineup?
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  #1299  
Old 03-29-2019, 11:51 AM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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Originally Posted by bob heinatz View Post
Incredible work Dave. Are you hinting that this could be a regular offering in your lineup?
Yes - I've not made a webpage for it but I've built a number for customers and I'll happily continue to offer them.

dave
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  #1300  
Old 03-29-2019, 11:54 AM
OtayBW OtayBW is offline
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Well, Dave - that Gothic fillet is nice, but that fork...........
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  #1301  
Old 04-11-2019, 10:29 AM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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A little #TBT action. The year was 2013 and that marked the 10th anniversary of the formation of Kirk Frameworks Co. To commemorate this milestone I built a limited edition of 10 special anniversary edition JK Specials. They were of course all made-to-measure and featured special lug shaping, dropouts, brake bridges, head badges and paint.

I had finished up the 10 builds and was about to box them all up for shipping to Joe Bell for paint when this photo presented itself.

Thank you all for the continued support over the years. I literally could not do this without you.

dave

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  #1302  
Old 04-11-2019, 10:46 AM
teleguy57 teleguy57 is offline
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Art at every step along the way! Congratulations on all the riders whose grins are wider and longer-lasting because of your skill and commitment over those years.
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  #1303  
Old 04-11-2019, 11:08 AM
Clean39T Clean39T is offline
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Is it too early to put down a deposit for a 20th Anniv edition?
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  #1304  
Old 04-11-2019, 06:10 PM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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I've always wanted to attend the Cino Ride near Whitefish, Montana but the schedule had never worked out for me in the past....but the stars aligned this year and the organizers of the ride have generously asked me to be their Official Guest Rider this year so I'm all in.

I'll be bringing a 1991 Serotta Coors Light Team issue bike I built with my own two hands way back then and I look forward to showing it off in the Concours taking place Friday evening....and of course seeing all the other vintage hardware.

The ride is a fund raiser for a very good cause and I hope you all will consider making the trip. Riding in Montana is a special event that is not to be missed.....and word on the street is that the food is awesome!

I hope you see you there.

dave

https://www.cinorider.com/


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  #1305  
Old 04-12-2019, 07:27 AM
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weisan weisan is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Kirk View Post
I'll be bringing a 1991 Serotta Coors Light Team issue bike I built with my own two hands way back then

dave


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