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  #1  
Old 04-28-2021, 12:47 PM
HiddenShadow20 HiddenShadow20 is offline
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Is it worth it to get a bike fit?

Hello,
I have some orthopedic issues and I've spent years adjusting my bike position until I've felt comfortable and able to utilize my muscles like I want to. I am satisfied with my position at the moment.
With that said, I was recently advised to visit a physical therapist in my area for a consultation. It's $300 at least which is a lot for me!
I just don't see the point if I'm already satisfied.
I feel like bike fits are just "opinions." For example, I put my saddle farther forward and up in order to utilize more of my glutes in the pedal stroke because I want a nice butt for the ladies lol. Also, because I felt that my glutes weren't working optimally. I put it as far forward as I could given my center of gravity.
I mean, a bike fitter may disagree and think my quads should take up more work.
I'd imagine that they may want to put me on shorter cranks, but honestly I don't feel like spending the cash. I am not doing any races or anything so I don't need to be 100% as fast as humanly possible. I just want to be comfortable.
Thanks
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  #2  
Old 04-28-2021, 12:50 PM
HiddenShadow20 HiddenShadow20 is offline
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edit

The physical therapist would do the bike fit, sorry if I wasn't clear about that. Also, I think the shorter cranks may be advised just to open my hip angle as it is pretty small at the moment. I don't know how to edit my posts
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  #3  
Old 04-28-2021, 01:18 PM
HiddenShadow20 HiddenShadow20 is offline
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Shoes?

Also, wouldn't any fitting be rendered moot if I got a new pair of shoes? Because the stack height etc. would be hard to know for sure...
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  #4  
Old 04-28-2021, 02:22 PM
prototoast prototoast is offline
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I find going to a bike fitter is a pretty big gamble. Most will help you get in the right ballpark if your fit is way off, but if you're really close but with something specific bothering you, I don't think you can know ahead of time if a bike fitter will help.

I took my wife to get a bike fit before getting her a custom frame, and the fitter helped find a more comfortable position for her, which the builder worked with to get her a bike that worked great for her. On the other hand, I went to a fitter with a few specific issues to address. 2 hours and $300 later, the fitter sent me home with no adjustments to my setup, and no insights as to the cause of my discomfort. Thankfully, they refunded my money after I complained, but it certainly wasn't a positive experience.
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  #5  
Old 04-28-2021, 05:05 PM
Peter P. Peter P. is offline
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I just don't see the point if I'm already satisfied
.

You just answered your own question.

I feel like bike fits are just "opinions."


True.

For example, I put my saddle farther forward ...I mean, a bike fitter may disagree and think my quads should take up more work.


I would agree with the imaginary bike fitter but if you're satisfied, fine.
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  #6  
Old 04-28-2021, 05:09 PM
Peter P. Peter P. is offline
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I just don't see the point if I'm already satisfied
.

You just answered your own question.

I feel like bike fits are just "opinions."


True.

For example, I put my saddle farther forward ...I mean, a bike fitter may disagree and think my quads should take up more work.


I would agree with the imaginary bike fitter but if you're satisfied, fine.


To answer your post's title, "Is it worth it to get a bike fit?", in some cases it is. If people haven't read any books or training manuals on bike set up and then tried the methods, they have no idea of the basics. If they have problems with their fit or are uncomfortable, then a fit or viewpoint from other than themselves can be a valuable and educational experience, worth the money even if it doesn't solve their problem.
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  #7  
Old 05-07-2021, 03:41 PM
OtayBW OtayBW is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HiddenShadow20 View Post
Hello,
I have some orthopedic issues and I've spent years adjusting my bike position until I've felt comfortable and able to utilize my muscles like I want to. I am satisfied with my position at the moment.
With that said, I was recently advised to visit a physical therapist in my area for a consultation. It's $300 at least which is a lot for me!
I just don't see the point if I'm already satisfied.
I feel like bike fits are just "opinions." For example, I put my saddle farther forward and up in order to utilize more of my glutes in the pedal stroke because I want a nice butt for the ladies lol. Also, because I felt that my glutes weren't working optimally. I put it as far forward as I could given my center of gravity.
I mean, a bike fitter may disagree and think my quads should take up more work.
I'd imagine that they may want to put me on shorter cranks, but honestly I don't feel like spending the cash. I am not doing any races or anything so I don't need to be 100% as fast as humanly possible. I just want to be comfortable.
Thanks
Isn't saddle rearward calling on your glutes more (or have I misremembered)?
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  #8  
Old 05-07-2021, 07:58 PM
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Hellgate Hellgate is offline
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In a word, yes.
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  #9  
Old 05-18-2021, 06:47 PM
HiddenShadow20 HiddenShadow20 is offline
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Got a bike fit

I ended up getting a bike fit in the Washington DC area.
What a great investment! I also got angled shims on both shoes which really helps me keep my knees straight when I pedal.
The lady who did it was great. It was $200 but for how much better I feel on the bike it was well worth it.
If anyone wants to know who I got the fit from, please send me a message. For anonymity I just would prefer to not publish this.
Thanks
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  #10  
Old 06-14-2021, 02:10 AM
Margot Margot is offline
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Thumbs up

Great discussion!

I found my answer.
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  #11  
Old 06-16-2021, 03:51 AM
DeBike DeBike is offline
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Not for me.
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  #12  
Old 06-16-2021, 04:11 PM
MikeD MikeD is offline
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I fit myself using established conventions. Years later I had a professional bike fit. Hardly changed my position at all. He turned me on to Specialized insoles and using a foam roller. That was helpful. Also advised going from 172.5 to 170 cranks, which I did when I built up a new bike. Not much difference there.
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  #13  
Old 12-13-2021, 04:14 PM
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Ti Designs Ti Designs is offline
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How to engage quads or glutes is something they don't teach in fitting school. I know this because I brought the subject up in every fitting school I've been to. The response has always been that pedaling technique is coaching, not fitting. That never made any sense to me, I fit riders based on getting their body weight on the pedal that's going down, which involves use of the glutes. If they can't learn how to transfer body weight to the pedals using the glutes, nothing else about the fit can work (unless you can levitate).

You have two large muscle groups which fight gravity all day, if you want to be effective on the pedals you should probably learn how to use them. The reason few people ever do is it's not the same as what you've learned from walking. There's also that old saying "as easy as riding a bike" which doesn't help...

Using the glutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ef3-A6aGyU

Using the quads: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok-m6LI7FD0

A little something extra: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sRPQSc_nSU


As for the opinions that you don't need a bike fit or you can do your fitting based on feel, I'm going to disagree. Most people know next to nothing about bike fitting, if you watched the first video you've probably realized that you've been pushing down wrong. You probably don't know what your limits of range of motion are, and most people are more than happy to ignore them. Fitting by feel is returning to what is familiar, which probably isn't right, it's just what you had before...
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  #14  
Old 01-21-2022, 02:11 PM
kvlin94 kvlin94 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ti Designs View Post
How to engage quads or glutes is something they don't teach in fitting school. I know this because I brought the subject up in every fitting school I've been to. The response has always been that pedaling technique is coaching, not fitting. That never made any sense to me, I fit riders based on getting their body weight on the pedal that's going down, which involves use of the glutes. If they can't learn how to transfer body weight to the pedals using the glutes, nothing else about the fit can work (unless you can levitate).

You have two large muscle groups which fight gravity all day, if you want to be effective on the pedals you should probably learn how to use them. The reason few people ever do is it's not the same as what you've learned from walking. There's also that old saying "as easy as riding a bike" which doesn't help...

Using the glutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ef3-A6aGyU

Using the quads: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok-m6LI7FD0

A little something extra: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7sRPQSc_nSU


As for the opinions that you don't need a bike fit or you can do your fitting based on feel, I'm going to disagree. Most people know next to nothing about bike fitting, if you watched the first video you've probably realized that you've been pushing down wrong. You probably don't know what your limits of range of motion are, and most people are more than happy to ignore them. Fitting by feel is returning to what is familiar, which probably isn't right, it's just what you had before...
This makes a lot of sense to me
We build bad habits that you don't even realize are bad from everyday life all the way to top performance athletics

However, the flip side of it would be why change a good thing?
I guess bottom line is if you think things are great, then why bother with a bike fit?
If you are asking the question do I need a bike fit, you probably have some concerns or something you want to optimize so there's your answer.. the question is if the fitter is worth their salt and will they be able to help you improve performance or comfort

A question completely outside of this I had.. since I am very new to cycling in general
Does a bike fit translate from bike to bike?

i.e. I bought a used bike which I am fairly certain is not optimized for me..
If I go to a fitter now, with this used bike, will their fitting numbers (maybe not achievable with my current bike) be able to be used to build a new bike in the future? And potentially also be replicated on a Tri bike?
If not, then I'll probably put off the fitting till the future
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  #15  
Old 01-22-2022, 03:45 PM
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Ti Designs Ti Designs is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kvlin94 View Post
A question completely outside of this I had.. since I am very new to cycling in general
Does a bike fit translate from bike to bike?
That depends on what the bike fitter is selling you. Lots of bike fitters sell the idea of putting you in the "perfect position", given 4 hours and lots of money. I don't believe that the perfect position exists - mine keeps changing. Every year I get a year older, this fall a back spasm reduced my range of motion, so my saddle position changed... As a bike fitter my job is to explain to my clients where their range of motion limits end. Part of that is what I can see, part of that is what they understand. They can apply that understanding to any other bike.

The tri bike is an interesting example because they push the limits of range of motion. If I'm doing a road bike fitting and the client asks about clip-on aero bars, I will first define their road bike position, then explain what changes need to happen for aero bars. In some cases it's an easy change, in others it's just not a good idea...
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