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  #1861  
Old 10-11-2021, 08:49 AM
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weisan weisan is offline
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Quote:
First the 753 bike. This bike, with its small diameter and flexi tubes, is a magic carpet ride. It is smooth in a way that needs to be felt to be understood. It soaks up road buzz and expansion joints like they aren’t there. It rewards riding in a smooth and controlled way.
Dave pal, thanks for writing up the blog. My rivendell road standard is built out of 753. I couldn't have said it better than the way you described how the 753 bike rides.



https://www.renehersecycles.com/1995...ning-the-tide/

Compared to my Serotta CXII that is built out of more modern steel, definitely different but in a good way. Lighter, more responsive power transfer.



Sometimes people who is ordering a new bike would say to their framebuilder, "I want my new bike to have the same "feel" as my old bike."
Well, that's all good and dandy but sometimes you gotta try something "new and different", who knows, you might actually like it "better" than your old bike.
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Last edited by weisan; 10-11-2021 at 08:52 AM.
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  #1862  
Old 10-25-2021, 04:49 PM
charlieclick charlieclick is offline
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New Bike, Dave?

Hi Dave,

As you recently sold your carbon-forked disc-braked Onesto, I’m interested to know what you're replacing it with. Do you have something in development?

Cheers,

Charlie.
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  #1863  
Old 10-25-2021, 05:21 PM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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Originally Posted by charlieclick View Post
Hi Dave,

As you recently sold your carbon-forked disc-braked Onesto, I’m interested to know what you're replacing it with. Do you have something in development?

Cheers,

Charlie.
Thanks for the question - I did sell my existing wide-road bike and I'm replacing it with another fillet stainless frame and matching stainless fork that will allow for up to a 40 mm tire and rim brakes. As much as I like disc brakes they really aren't needed for the routes I will ride this bike on and I wanted the bike to be as simple, light and sweet riding as it could be....and since discs require that the frame and fork be made stiffer and heavier I'll be going with rim caliper brakes to allow for light and smooth riding skinny fork blades.

I'll have photos to share soon....the fork is done and I'll be starting the frame soon.

dave
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  #1864  
Old 10-25-2021, 07:35 PM
Bici-Sonora Bici-Sonora is offline
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Originally Posted by David Kirk View Post
Thanks for the question - I did sell my existing wide-road bike and I'm replacing it with another fillet stainless frame and matching stainless fork that will allow for up to a 40 mm tire and rim brakes. I'll be going with rim caliper brakes
dave
Caliper brakes, stainless steel
Fork, and 40(!)mm tire clearance—Color me interested!

I’m curious about what kind of brakes you’ll be using? I remember a mid-reach rim brake bike that Aaron (AR Cycles) shared here that fit 38mm tires.


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  #1865  
Old 10-25-2021, 07:51 PM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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Originally Posted by Bici-Sonora View Post
Caliper brakes, stainless steel
Fork, and 40(!)mm tire clearance—Color me interested!

I’m curious about what kind of brakes you’ll be using? I remember a mid-reach rim brake bike that Aaron (AR Cycles) shared here that fit 38mm tires.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I'm working with Velo Orange right now as it looks to have the most head room of any of the mid-reach calipers. Head room is the biggest challenge when it comes to fitting larger tires under a brake caliper....most brakes will have enough width on the sides to fit a wide tire but the center tread of the tire gets too close to the underside of the caliper near the mounting bolt (lacking head room).

The other issue is finding a brake that will open far enough to let a big tire in/out without too much fuss. The Velo Orange brake will let a 38 squeeze by without much trouble.

dave
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  #1866  
Old 10-26-2021, 08:39 AM
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AngryScientist AngryScientist is offline
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You may be aware of this Dave, but Mike V at Black Mountain did some comparing of mid reach brakes some time ago on his blog and my own experience agrees with his conclusions.

https://blackmtncycles.com/clearance-pt-ii-road-frames/
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  #1867  
Old 10-26-2021, 09:46 AM
charlieclick charlieclick is offline
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Thanks for replying

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Kirk View Post
Thanks for the question - I did sell my existing wide-road bike and I'm replacing it with another fillet stainless frame and matching stainless fork that will allow for up to a 40 mm tire and rim brakes. As much as I like disc brakes they really aren't needed for the routes I will ride this bike on and I wanted the bike to be as simple, light and sweet riding as it could be....and since discs require that the frame and fork be made stiffer and heavier I'll be going with rim caliper brakes to allow for light and smooth riding skinny fork blades.

I'll have photos to share soon....the fork is done and I'll be starting the frame soon.

dave
I'm interested to see this come together.
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  #1868  
Old 10-26-2021, 05:47 PM
brewsmith brewsmith is offline
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Very interested to see if you can squeeze a 40 under the VO calipers. That's probably wider than I'd ever go, but if anyone can do it, it's Dave. Looking forward to some pics/specs!
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  #1869  
Old 10-26-2021, 06:13 PM
Gwerziou Gwerziou is offline
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Originally Posted by brewsmith View Post
Very interested to see if you can squeeze a 40 under the VO calipers. That's probably wider than I'd ever go, but if anyone can do it, it's Dave. Looking forward to some pics/specs!
Would any of you ever consider going to brakes such as the Pauls Mini-Motos? I have those on an older steel cyclocross bike and have been extremely impressed with them.
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  #1870  
Old 10-26-2021, 06:56 PM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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Originally Posted by brewsmith View Post
Very interested to see if you can squeeze a 40 under the VO calipers. That's probably wider than I'd ever go, but if anyone can do it, it's Dave. Looking forward to some pics/specs!
It looks like a 38 mm tire will just squeeze by the brake pads - it will rub the pads but not by much. A 40 would rub more and could start to be a PITA to get in and out.

I think the practical limit will be closer to 38 mm actual measured tire width.

dave
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  #1871  
Old 10-26-2021, 07:00 PM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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Originally Posted by Gwerziou View Post
Would any of you ever consider going to brakes such as the Pauls Mini-Motos? I have those on an older steel cyclocross bike and have been extremely impressed with them.
Hey - thanks for the question.

That could be a tough one if the frame is stainless. There's very few builders still making anything with canti studs so many shops have discontinued making them even in steel. I personally do not know of any place one can get stainless canti studs and having a very small number of them cut would be very spendy.

I don't think I've put canti studs on a bike in a number of years at this point.

dave
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  #1872  
Old 10-27-2021, 02:14 PM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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Tube mitering must be one of the least talked about yet most important parts of framebuilding. It doesn’t matter if the frame is lugged, fillet brazed, or tigged - it’s extremely important that the tube miters be tight.

When building a lugged frame the miters are hidden within the lug but they are just as important as when building lugless. Tight miters allow for full and complete flow of the silver filler thought the lug from one side to the other and this in turn makes for a strong and straight frame. When building with fillets it’s easy to glop a fillet over a big gap in the miter...frankly it’s easier than making the miters tight…but the one sure way to build a crooked frame is to fillet over gaps. When the filler cools it contracts and if there is a gap between the tubes being joined it will pull that gap in and thus pull the frame out of line. By having the tubes in complete contact with each other you know that you won’t watch the frame get twisted out of line as it cools.

These tubes are stainless and will get silver fillets and when done they will be left in the raw and used sans paint. It’s the beginning of my first new personal bike in about 5 years and I’m squeezing in the work as I can between customer builds. It'll be a fun ride when it’s done.

dave
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  #1873  
Old 10-27-2021, 05:25 PM
NHAero NHAero is online now
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Are we looking at a lot of hand filing here? I've wondered as I look at the TT and DT where they join the tapered HT on my Strong, how those miters are made. Or to any not-round tube...

Thank you

Quote:
Originally Posted by David Kirk View Post
Tube mitering must be one of the least talked about yet most important parts of framebuilding. It doesn’t matter if the frame is lugged, fillet brazed, or tigged - it’s extremely important that the tube miters be tight.

When building a lugged frame the miters are hidden within the lug but they are just as important as when building lugless. Tight miters allow for full and complete flow of the silver filler thought the lug from one side to the other and this in turn makes for a strong and straight frame. When building with fillets it’s easy to glop a fillet over a big gap in the miter...frankly it’s easier than making the miters tight…but the one sure way to build a crooked frame is to fillet over gaps. When the filler cools it contracts and if there is a gap between the tubes being joined it will pull that gap in and thus pull the frame out of line. By having the tubes in complete contact with each other you know that you won’t watch the frame get twisted out of line as it cools.

These tubes are stainless and will get silver fillets and when done they will be left in the raw and used sans paint. It’s the beginning of my first new personal bike in about 5 years and I’m squeezing in the work as I can between customer builds. It'll be a fun ride when it’s done.

dave
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  #1874  
Old 10-27-2021, 06:18 PM
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David Kirk David Kirk is offline
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Originally Posted by NHAero View Post
Are we looking at a lot of hand filing here? I've wondered as I look at the TT and DT where they join the tapered HT on my Strong, how those miters are made. Or to any not-round tube...

Thank you
We'd need to get Carl to chime in but I believe he would be mitering his tubes on a mill and making angle adjustments to compensate for the tapered tube.

I do all my mitering by hand and do not use a mill. I rough it in with a hacksaw and then use a hand file and/or a dynafile (small hand held belt sander) to finish it up. It's takes a lot of practice to be able to do it accurately and quickly but one can get super tight miters by hand.

dave
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  #1875  
Old 10-28-2021, 10:36 PM
Gwerziou Gwerziou is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Kirk View Post
Tube mitering must be one of the least talked about yet most important parts of framebuilding. It doesn’t matter if the frame is lugged, fillet brazed, or tigged - it’s extremely important that the tube miters be tight.

When building a lugged frame the miters are hidden within the lug but they are just as important as when building lugless. Tight miters allow for full and complete flow of the silver filler thought the lug from one side to the other and this in turn makes for a strong and straight frame. When building with fillets it’s easy to glop a fillet over a big gap in the miter...frankly it’s easier than making the miters tight…but the one sure way to build a crooked frame is to fillet over gaps. When the filler cools it contracts and if there is a gap between the tubes being joined it will pull that gap in and thus pull the frame out of line. By having the tubes in complete contact with each other you know that you won’t watch the frame get twisted out of line as it cools.

These tubes are stainless and will get silver fillets and when done they will be left in the raw and used sans paint. It’s the beginning of my first new personal bike in about 5 years and I’m squeezing in the work as I can between customer builds. It'll be a fun ride when it’s done.

dave
Incredibly lovely.
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