Know the rules The Paceline Forum Builder's Spotlight


Go Back   The Paceline Forum > Bike Fit

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 07-20-2021, 07:59 AM
Smitty2k1 Smitty2k1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 515
Saddle position

I've been playing around with saddles recently. Bought a few used and trying them out.

I've found that when I swap saddles I'm frequently feeling like I need to move rearward on the saddle. I'll lift my butt up and slide it back. I can't tell if I'm sitting too far back on the saddle, or the saddle is adjust wrong, or if it just has to do with the shape and width.

Is there a common indicator of adjustment needed for someone that's always trying to scoot back on the saddle?

For reference, here's what I've been trying;
Specialized Power (normal and wide - I was professionally fit using the wide and that's my point of reference for this comparison)
Fizik Antares (normal and wide)
Fizik Akiante (wide)
Cardiff leather (Brooks clone)

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 07-20-2021, 08:47 AM
herb5998 herb5998 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Montreal, QC
Posts: 878
If you're having to push back against, what angle are you running the saddle at? Also, are you feeling more pressure on the hands?
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 07-20-2021, 10:32 AM
Nomadmax Nomadmax is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 364
Sounds to me like you're not getting consistant set back between the saddles you're using. For me, fit starts with saddle height and set back, everything else keys of that.

I measure the usable area of the saddle. For instance, a Pro Stealth claims a 250mm length but in reality it's 240mm. I use calipers to find the mid point (120mm) and mark it with blue painter's tape, sometimes I'll mark the saddle with a Sharpie. I set the saddle height from the top of the BB shell (40mm/2 =20mm) with a straight edge and add the aformentioned 20mm (more repeatable than "center of BB spindle"). The ending point is the bottom edge of a small level sitting on the saddle at mid point.

Once I find the correct set back, usually after a test ride, I will move the saddle fore or aft as needed and recheck saddle height. When both are correct, I measure set back with a plumb line from the mid point of the saddle to the center of BB shell. Once those numbers are recorded, I can pretty much transfer them to my other road bikes or at least use them as a starting point, independent of what saddle I use, middle is middle.

Every other measurement on the bike starts at midpoint of the saddle.

Saddle to bars
Saddle to hoods
Saddle to ground
*Bars to ground
*Drops to ground
*not these of course.
__________________
You lost me at "carbon fiber".
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 07-20-2021, 12:32 PM
Smitty2k1 Smitty2k1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadmax View Post
Sounds to me like you're not getting consistant set back between the saddles you're using. For me, fit starts with saddle height and set back, everything else keys of that.



I measure the usable area of the saddle. For instance, a Pro Stealth claims a 250mm length but in reality it's 240mm. I use calipers to find the mid point (120mm) and mark it with blue painter's tape, sometimes I'll mark the saddle with a Sharpie. I set the saddle height from the top of the BB shell (40mm/2 =20mm) with a straight edge and add the aformentioned 20mm (more repeatable than "center of BB spindle"). The ending point is the bottom edge of a small level sitting on the saddle at mid point.



Once I find the correct set back, usually after a test ride, I will move the saddle fore or aft as needed and recheck saddle height. When both are correct, I measure set back with a plumb line from the mid point of the saddle to the center of BB shell. Once those numbers are recorded, I can pretty much transfer them to my other road bikes or at least use them as a starting point, independent of what saddle I use, middle is middle.



Every other measurement on the bike starts at midpoint of the saddle.



Saddle to bars

Saddle to hoods

Saddle to ground

*Bars to ground

*Drops to ground

*not these of course.
Thanks, so it seems the midpoint isn't to compare saddle to saddle, but to just have as a landmark on the saddle adjusted against itself?

I've always struggled with saddle fore/aft positioning and tilt. I never feel "planted" in any saddles I try so it's hard to judge if I'm even really sitting on the same spot each time. I squirm in the saddle a lot, but sometimes when I set them up I feel I'm constantly pushing myself rearward to readjust my position. Trying to figure out what that means in terms of saddle adjustments.

Surprisingly out of all the saddles I've tried there's only one that was "bad" all the rest felt ok-ish in different ways.

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 07-20-2021, 12:56 PM
pasadena pasadena is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 1,411
For me, those indicate a few possible problems:
1. saddle too high
2. saddle tilted nose down too much
3. saddle too far back
4. hip instability (saddle too flat or too narrow or too wide) but usually it's just too high.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 07-21-2021, 04:31 AM
Nomadmax Nomadmax is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2019
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 364
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smitty2k1 View Post
Thanks, so it seems the midpoint isn't to compare saddle to saddle, but to just have as a landmark on the saddle adjusted against itself?

I've always struggled with saddle fore/aft positioning and tilt. I never feel "planted" in any saddles I try so it's hard to judge if I'm even really sitting on the same spot each time. I squirm in the saddle a lot, but sometimes when I set them up I feel I'm constantly pushing myself rearward to readjust my position. Trying to figure out what that means in terms of saddle adjustments.

Surprisingly out of all the saddles I've tried there's only one that was "bad" all the rest felt ok-ish in different ways.

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
In a way, it is apples to apples inasmuch that you're comparing the same landmark on all saddles. Middle is middle and that's where you'll probably spend most of the time provided saddle height and set back are correct.

Until those two things are correct, I wouldn't change anything else on the bike.
__________________
You lost me at "carbon fiber".
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 07-21-2021, 06:07 AM
Peter P. Peter P. is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Meriden CT
Posts: 5,849
You're asking for too much with so little information.

A pic of the bike might help.

Your saddle could be too low.
The fore/aft of the saddle could be wrong.
The saddle tilt could be wrong.
Your crankarms could be the wrong length.
Your cleats could be set incorrectly.

The type of saddle you're using is a minor factor.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 07-21-2021, 08:23 AM
Smitty2k1 Smitty2k1 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 515
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter P. View Post
You're asking for too much with so little information.



A pic of the bike might help.



Your saddle could be too low.

The fore/aft of the saddle could be wrong.

The saddle tilt could be wrong.

Your crankarms could be the wrong length.

Your cleats could be set incorrectly.



The type of saddle you're using is a minor factor.
Sorry wasn't really looking for holistic bike fit advice though I understand it is all tied together. Just wondering if my desire to always move rearward on the saddle was directly the result of some common setup issue.

Sent from my SM-G991U using Tapatalk
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 07-21-2021, 05:34 PM
Peter P. Peter P. is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Meriden CT
Posts: 5,849
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smitty2k1 View Post
...Just wondering if my desire to always move rearward on the saddle was directly the result of some common setup issue.
Thanks for the clarification.

Sliding back on the saddle could be caused by:

Saddle too low, and you're trying to compensate.

Saddle tilted down in front, possibly due to pressure issues. These pressure issues could be caused by a high amount of saddle to bar drop, causing excessive pelvis rotation. Tip: The UCI will accept +/- 4 degrees of saddle tilt. You may not be a racer, or need to follow UCI regs, but the spec should give you an idea of what's acceptable.

Saddle too far forward.

I can't really say any of the above are "common" however.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:01 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.