Know the rules The Paceline Forum Builder's Spotlight


Go Back   The Paceline Forum > General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #16  
Old 07-11-2020, 09:06 AM
YesNdeed's Avatar
YesNdeed YesNdeed is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Location: Interior New Mexico
Posts: 944
While riding tubeless, you have a pucture, PSSSSSSSSSS! Sealant is quick to the rescue and the puncture seals. Do you then pull over and wait 24 hours before finishing the ride?

Ok, well that comment was just for fun. My point is that I just seat the tires with sealant, shake the wheel wildly in all directions, good to go.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 07-11-2020, 09:09 AM
RoosterCogset RoosterCogset is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Posts: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by cinema View Post
I think that is a myth. the bead pops and thats that. the sealant does not prevent the tire from losing air or staying on the rim in any significant way at all. it would make sense if you want to leave it for a few minutes to monitor if it's losing air at the spoke holes due to rim damage or due to poor fitment but it would be pretty apparent in just a little bit.

as you said the tires seat without sealant. one could ride them that way until something flats the tire. i mount a new tire with sealant then head out for a ride.
Is this topic dependent on whether we're talking about Tubeless Ready vs Tubeless tires? ie. is this article incorrect?

https://www.bicycling.com/skills-tips/a27628336/tubeless-tires-guide/#:~:text=Tubeless%20ready%20tires%20don't,bed%20it self%20is%20not%20sealed.

Quote: "Tubeless ready tires don’t have the sealed casing that UST tires (see below) do. That makes them lighter, and also means they require sealant to hold air.

Tubeless Compatible: A tubeless-compatible wheel or rim is one in which the rim has a bead lock, but the rim bed itself is not sealed. Some companies use “tubeless ready” and “tubeless compatible” as synonyms. In either case, the components needed to run the wheel and tire combo as a tubeless setup are the same: a sealed rim bed, tire with a tubeless bead lock, and sealant.
"
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 07-11-2020, 09:12 AM
Hellgate's Avatar
Hellgate Hellgate is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Location: Austin, TX
Posts: 890
If you have to wait you may as well use a tube. Otherwise, it defeats the purpose.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 07-11-2020, 09:27 AM
cinema cinema is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,888
Quote:
Originally Posted by RoosterCogset View Post
Is this topic dependent on whether we're talking about Tubeless Ready vs Tubeless tires? ie. is this article incorrect?

https://www.bicycling.com/skills-tips/a27628336/tubeless-tires-guide/#:~:text=Tubeless%20ready%20tires%20don't,bed%20it self%20is%20not%20sealed.

Quote: "Tubeless ready tires don’t have the sealed casing that UST tires (see below) do. That makes them lighter, and also means they require sealant to hold air.

Tubeless Compatible: A tubeless-compatible wheel or rim is one in which the rim has a bead lock, but the rim bed itself is not sealed. Some companies use “tubeless ready” and “tubeless compatible” as synonyms. In either case, the components needed to run the wheel and tire combo as a tubeless setup are the same: a sealed rim bed, tire with a tubeless bead lock, and sealant.
"
Whether or not this is true is irrelevant, because letting the wheel sit overnight will simply pool the sealant to downward facing part of the tire. riding the tire will spread the sealant and therefore assist in this allowing the thinner casing to hold air better over time. the sealant is not supposed to really dry inside the tire (though it will over time) to 'seal it,' certainly not after 24 hours. but it will lay a wet film over it sure, increasing the mass of rubber and thereby allowing less air to escape i guess. All rubber will allow air to escape the tire eventually, which is why you have to pump it up.

Last edited by cinema; 07-11-2020 at 09:31 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 07-11-2020, 10:35 AM
Davist's Avatar
Davist Davist is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 849
Ride immediately after "shaking" the sealant into the bead. Riding pushes the sealant into any potential holes with better force than you can manage otherwise. I thought this was the recommended procedure, what I've always done..
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 07-11-2020, 11:16 AM
MikeD MikeD is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2015
Posts: 938
How long after mounting tubeless do you ride them (road)

Riding doesn’t get the sealant into the sidewalls and bead area of the tire to any appreciable extent because of centripetal force, which forces the sealant into the tread area. That's why you should shake or spin the wheel around when it is in a horizontal position after you put the sealant in.

I use one of these plastic planter boxes filled with water to look for leaks in the tire, rim tape, valve... $8 at Lowes. Seal the holes in the box with duct tape.

Last edited by MikeD; 07-11-2020 at 11:41 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 07-11-2020, 12:21 PM
nalax nalax is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2015
Location: Chicago
Posts: 339
Depends a lot on the tire. I had Compass SBH's which started seeping sealant out the sidewalls right away. Those took a while before they sealed. Gravel Kings, WTB, even Challenge TL all have been easier for me.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 07-11-2020, 01:08 PM
cinema cinema is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 1,888
sealant seeping out of the sidewalls? that is crazy. never witnessed that but maybe with these lighter thinner casings i can see it happening. i guess if you see sealant seeping out shortly after it's best to wait a bit. i would guess air would be escaping anyway on that tire through a tube if that is happening, you just can't see it.

Last edited by cinema; 07-11-2020 at 01:10 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 07-11-2020, 01:26 PM
Davist's Avatar
Davist Davist is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Posts: 849
Sealant leaking out the sidewalls is poor design implementation.. but at least you pay a lot for it!
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:51 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.