Builder's Spotlight The Paceline Forum Builder's Spotlight


Go Back   The Paceline Forum > Bike Fit

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-27-2018, 12:09 PM
sun sun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 35
Switched shoes - calf cramping

Looking for some help here. I switched from S-Works 6 shoes to the Bont Helix in Wide to get some more toe box room. This was about 2 weeks ago.

I set up the cleats as close to the old position as possible. At my next race, I had a bad right calf cramp after 40min or so. I moved the cleats back a few mm. The cleats are a few mm from being back as far as they will go. On race #2, my left calf cramped about 40min as well. I then moved the seat down about 4-5mm as I read the stack height on the Bont's are lower than most. On race #3, my left leg had a cramp about 20min in. On the rides in between the races, they have been fine, but those rides haven't been as intense.

Do I just need to keep riding and getting used to the shoes, or are there other tweaks I should try?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 04-27-2018, 01:06 PM
benb benb is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Bedford, MA
Posts: 4,408
I've been noticing lately moving the saddle up and forward makes point my toes and then I become vulnerable to calf cramping and numb toes. (I gave up and moved the saddle back to where it was)

Maybe go have someone look at you on the trainer and observe your ankle position, it's possible something about the new shoes and/or cleats is making you point your toes down more than normal and activate your calfs differently.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-27-2018, 07:47 PM
ultraman6970 ultraman6970 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 19,012
Saddle height problem due to the stack height of the shoes?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-27-2018, 08:07 PM
Peter P. Peter P. is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Meriden CT
Posts: 4,358
Do the Bont shoes have a built-in varus tilt for the forefoot? I've found that a cause for calf pain.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-27-2018, 08:28 PM
sun sun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 35
Thanks for the replies. I have moved the saddle height down. I'll have someone video me and see if I can spot something.

That's a good point on the varus tilt. Specialized shoes have this built in, and the Bont don't. I'll experiment with this.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-28-2018, 08:01 AM
ultraman6970 ultraman6970 is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 19,012
IMO, If your feet dont hurt then the varus/valgus should be ok.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-29-2018, 07:25 AM
Climb01742 Climb01742 is offline
needs adult supervision
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Concord, MA
Posts: 12,963
One other thought...I’ve found that a footbed that works well for me in other shoes (specialized and shimano) don’t work well in Bonts. The flat tub shape of Bonts seat the footbed differently. Could that be contributing? Different shoes affect my calves, too.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-30-2018, 07:17 AM
pdonk pdonk is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: 416
Posts: 663
I have bonts, one thing I noticed when I first got them is that due to the arch supports and the alignment they force through the lower leg and knee I had foot cramps and other aches. Once I spent the time and got the arch support moulded to my foot better, they aches went away.

And yes, the low stack of the shoe played a role and I had to lower my saddle and I also adjusted my cleat position.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-30-2018, 01:26 PM
John H. John H. is online now
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 3,359
Bont Helix

The Bont Helix has worked well for me but I have been wearing Bonts for a couple years-

I have found that the shoes work best with supportive insoles- Either custom ones or a supportive stock insole like Specialized or similar. The stock Bont insoles are too thin.

Shoes are quite flat in terms of the sole- This may be the major change for you.

Cleats may not go as far back as on other shoes- Maybe just move them as far back as they do go-
Different brand shoes line up differently in terms of where the cleats need to go- You can't just do it by eyeballing where the bolts are relative to the spacers.

Saddle height- you may need to drop your saddle- But you should know what you are aiming for so that you maintain the same amount of relative leg extension that you have with other shoes-
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-30-2018, 09:38 PM
sun sun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 35
Appreciate the additional replies. I ended up putting in a cleat wedge and I did a 3.5 hour trainer ride last weekend and the calves didn't cramp. I'll be doing another race this week and we will see how that goes.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-02-2018, 11:47 PM
azrider's Avatar
azrider azrider is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Snottsdale, AZ
Posts: 3,199
Quote:
Originally Posted by sun View Post
Appreciate the additional replies. I ended up putting in a cleat wedge and I did a 3.5 hour trainer ride last weekend and the calves didn't cramp. I'll be doing another race this week and we will see how that goes.
3.5 hr on the trainer?






respect.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-04-2018, 12:18 AM
sun sun is offline
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 35
Raced on the shoes with the shims and the left calf cramped again. I'll keep experimenting, but I'll probably take out the cleat wedges.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 07-11-2018, 03:37 AM
oliviawj oliviawj is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 1
Smile

My experience with them is that it's usually me triggering them, i.e sitting in a particular way on the sofa after a ride often causes my hamstring to start to cramp. Getting out of bed in the morning if I'm not careful can trigger a cramp in my calf muscle. I tend to avoid those triggers. Now I try taking a little salt water the night before the ride and make sure to take enough isotonic drinks during and after the ride. Yes, in the past towards the end of long rides I've had cramping starting in my foot and sometimes my calves - perhaps bike fit has helped here (I don't seem to have had them for a while) at the time on the bike I would slow down, relax, try not to tense muscles;and yes to speed muscle repair for faster recovery my boyfriend gave me his compression socks for man. This helps with the removal of blood lactate from muscles to reduce swelling and speed muscle repair for faster recovery. Hope this was helpful..
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:04 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.