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  #16  
Old 10-28-2021, 10:38 AM
pritchet74 pritchet74 is offline
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I have those same tubeless tires on my WTO45s. I have found that when they start to lose air at that rate, that the sealant has dried out. Sealant only lasts 3-6 months before drying out.
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  #17  
Old 10-28-2021, 10:49 AM
MikeD MikeD is offline
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Tubeless tires...

How are you checking air pressure? My tire pressure drops at least 10 psi (maybe more) when I reconnect the pump head to the tire because the tire pressure has to repressurize the hose.
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  #18  
Old 10-28-2021, 10:49 AM
Jared Purdy Jared Purdy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pritchet74 View Post
I have those same tubeless tires on my WTO45s. I have found that when they start to lose air at that rate, that the sealant has dried out. Sealant only lasts 3-6 months before drying out.
Thanks. Good to know. I'm not sure how old the wheels/tires are? I was told by the owner, and had this confirmed by a Campagnolo dealer that the wheels have barely been used, as per the non-existent wear on the rim brake surface and the like-new condition of the tires. That being said, the tires could have been put on over a year ago and just sat there. I seem to recall though that the owner had recently purchased the wheels.

I just sent a message to the previous owner to enquire when the tires were put on.

Do you recommend simply adding more sealant or taking the tire off, cleaning out the old sealant and then put the tire back on and adding new sealant?
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  #19  
Old 10-28-2021, 10:52 AM
MikeD MikeD is offline
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Aren't the 5000TL's full tubeless, meaning that sealant is not required?
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  #20  
Old 10-28-2021, 10:53 AM
Jared Purdy Jared Purdy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeD View Post
How are you checking air pressure? My tire pressure drops at least 10 psi (maybe more) when I reconnect the hose because the tire pressure has to repressurize the hose.
I simply connect the chuck to the valve and pump until the gauge attached to the pump hits 80psi. That being said, the gauge could be off. I'm going to see about buying a digital one today. Supplies in a lot of the stores seem limited, to out of stock. May have to give in to Amazon. I'm looking at the Topeak Smartgauge D2.
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  #21  
Old 10-28-2021, 10:57 AM
Jared Purdy Jared Purdy is offline
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Originally Posted by MikeD View Post
Aren't the 5000TL's full tubeless, meaning that sealant is not required?
Good question. Being the tubeless newbie that I am, I'm the wrong person to be asking that question. However, when I took the rear wheel to the shop that carries them, and explained that I'm new to tubeless, and commenced asking what I needed in the event of a flat or a tire change, I was handed a bottle of Stans tire sealant and a Lezyne tubeless repair kit, so I'd guess that sealant is required. That being said, I'm going to call and ask.
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  #22  
Old 10-28-2021, 10:59 AM
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AngryScientist AngryScientist is offline
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I realize this is a cycling forum and overthinking is part of what we do here, but with that said, i think you're overthinking all of this. Add a few ounces of more sealant, pump up the tires and ride IMO. Sounds like you've made out just fine without a digital gauge for a few decades and overcomplicating things with checking PSI to the single digit accuracy is not necessary to enjoy the ride, again IMO.
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  #23  
Old 10-28-2021, 11:08 AM
Jared Purdy Jared Purdy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeD View Post
Aren't the 5000TL's full tubeless, meaning that sealant is not required?
I just called the shop: sealant is required in the WTO wheels.
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  #24  
Old 10-28-2021, 11:14 AM
Jared Purdy Jared Purdy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pritchet74 View Post
I have those same tubeless tires on my WTO45s. I have found that when they start to lose air at that rate, that the sealant has dried out. Sealant only lasts 3-6 months before drying out.
I just spoke to a technician at the store that carries them. He said that if the tire is properly sealed, it should hold the pressure for about a week before it starts to drop.

He also said if the tire appears to be leaking, without knowing what kind of sealant is in there now, that I should remove one side of the tire, clean out the old sealant put the tire back in place and add a bottle of new sealant. He said not to mix different manufacturers' sealants.

Lastly, he said I should run the pressure at close to the tire manufacture's recommended setting for the size of the tire. In the case of mine, which are Continental 5000 TL 25's, the recommended psi is 109. The technician suggested 100. He said the rims are designed for it.

Last edited by Jared Purdy; 10-28-2021 at 12:45 PM.
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  #25  
Old 10-28-2021, 11:26 AM
NHAero NHAero is offline
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Stans recommends 2 ounces of sealant for road tubeless. Unless you're a lot heavier than most folks, 100 psi seems high for tubeless 700Cx25.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Jared Purdy View Post
I just spoke to a technician at the store that carries them. He said that if the tire is properly sealed, it should hod the pressure for about a week before it starts to drop.

He also said if the tire appears to be leaking, without knowing what kind of sealant is in there now, that I should remove one side of the tire, clean out the old sealant put the tire back in place and add a bottle of new sealant. He said not to mix different manufacturers' sealants.

Lastly, he said I should run the pressure at close to the tire manufacture's recommended setting for the size of the tire. In the case of mine, which are Continental 5000 TL 25's, the recommended psi is 109. The technician suggested 100. He said the rims are designed for it.
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  #26  
Old 10-28-2021, 11:32 AM
Jaybee Jaybee is offline
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I couldn't disagree more strongly with the recommendation to run 100psi. That's going to feel like a rock unless you're north of 350 lbs. I also question any blanket recommendation to run a certain pressure without knowing all the parameters. Use a tire pressure calculator like the Zipp/Sram one.

https://axs.sram.com/guides/tire/pressure


Also, while I agree that it wouldn't hurt to pull the tire and start fresh, the mixing of sealant types causing some type of catastrophic unwanted chemical reaction is greatly overstated. If you are losing that much psi in 24 hours and can't hear sealant sloshing, then there's not enough to react with your new sealant anyway, even if they weren't all essentially the same goop with different dyes. The primary reason I would tell you to do this is so you understand your tire/rim/sealant system better.
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  #27  
Old 10-28-2021, 11:40 AM
PaMtbRider PaMtbRider is offline
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A couple of thoughts. As mentioned above, regardless of condition of the wheels, or what type of sealant, it dries up and needs periodic replacement. I just did this on my gravel bike that has been sitting unloved for the last 6 months.

Your technician is clueless regarding tire pressure with tubeless setup. Over 100 psi is ridiculously high.
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  #28  
Old 10-28-2021, 11:49 AM
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biker72 biker72 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldpotatoe View Post
It's actually not that big of a deal.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PoVOspzNoW8
They don't make them one at a time????
Great video. Thanks.
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  #29  
Old 10-28-2021, 12:02 PM
MikeD MikeD is offline
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Dunk the inflated tire in water. You'll see where it's leaking.
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  #30  
Old 10-28-2021, 12:11 PM
qnz qnz is offline
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I have 2 sets of tubeless road wheels, including WTO45s. I would say they lose about 2psi a day starting from 70psi but wont fall lower than 40psi. I have to pump them up every weekend
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