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-   -   Strong Frames (https://forums.thepaceline.net/showthread.php?t=120746)

echelon_john 12-10-2012 11:04 AM

Carl,
Based on the photo threads you seem to make a lot of larger frames. Do you feel like this is true? Your larger bikes are beautifully proportioned.

jwad 12-10-2012 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Clydesdale (Post 1254839)
Fortunate enough to own a 2nd hand strong and I absolutely love it. Rock solid, lively, handles great... etc. If/when I order a custom frame, there is no question I would call Carl first.

Same here. I love my second hand strong. I've been considering selling it, but a replacement that is custom built for me will follow.

rnhood 12-10-2012 06:17 PM

My compliments for a clean, organized and focused shop. Lot of nice looking bikes. Since you ride your creations, how would you describe the basic differences between your metal and carbon bikes?

xjoex 12-10-2012 09:11 PM

My third hand strong is pretty awesome.
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-L...0/IMG_0138.jpg

-Joe

Lionel 12-11-2012 09:27 AM

This picture is cool because Carl is welding my XCr bike in it ....

http://forums.thepaceline.net/attach...1&d=1354981194

This resulted in this bike and it's a cool one.

http://i1068.photobucket.com/albums/...rongshamal.jpg

One thing when dealing with Carl was that the communication was always fast and good.

Carl Strong 12-11-2012 10:11 AM

Sorry so slow
 
Hi everyone, thanks for the kind words and the questions. Sorry I've been so slow at getting back to you. I'm currently in the process of moving to a new shop and am not around a computer during the day. I welcome all questions and will make a point of answering any in the mornings before I start moving. Hopefully I'll be all moved in and building frames again next week.

mnoble485 12-11-2012 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by echelon_john (Post 1254855)
Carl,
Based on the photo threads you seem to make a lot of larger frames. Do you feel like this is true? Your larger bikes are beautifully proportioned.

I second this thought.

Large frames often look "off" but Carl seems to have nailed it! I have ridden with a friend who has a custom Strong and it is a beauty.

Talked to Carl and his wife at a couple of NAHBS and they were nice enough to listen and respond like they really cared.


Mike

William 12-11-2012 10:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carl Strong (Post 1255412)
Hi everyone, thanks for the kind words and the questions. Sorry I've been so slow at getting back to you. I'm currently in the process of moving to a new shop and am not around a computer during the day. I welcome all questions and will make a point of answering any in the mornings before I start moving. Hopefully I'll be all moved in and building frames again next week.

Hey Carl,

I've seen some photos of the new shop on FB. It's looking nice and really coming together. If I lived a little closer I would offer to give you a hand!:)





William

Carl Strong 12-11-2012 10:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by William (Post 1254832)
Carl,

You seem to be one of a small number of builders who has chosen to offer builds in steel, titanium, and carbon fiber. Could you describe the drive behind that evolution for us? Was that a customer pull/demand, or as the technologies became available did you prefer to delve into them to see what they could offer for potential customers?



Thanks,
William

I think it's more about stretching my legs as a builder than anything. My passion for building drives me to always try to be better. Learning new materials, techniques, tools, etc. is what excites me and keeps me at at the bench feeling fresh and excited.

Carl Strong 12-11-2012 10:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EDS (Post 1254854)
Carl - What went into the decision to stop making aluminum/scandium frames? If someone begged, would you make one again?

Hi EDS, more than anything was that it was very smelly and noisy, just no fun. It's also very hot and a lot different from the steel and Ti. So when the demand started to fade, I took the opportunity to remove AL from my pricing. I haven't built an AL frame for probably five years now and don't miss it a bit.

I might also add that to take full advantage of the attributes of AL is to make a light frame. In doing so, the frame will have a finite service life. If you build a longer life into the frame you start to lose the advantage of AL and may as well go to steel or Ti.

PS, I forgot to answer this part of the question. I wouldn't sell and AL frame now even if begged to. The reason is that it would take a half dozen frames before I'd be back up to speed with AL so I couldn't really produce anything of high enough quality to sell anymore.

Carl Strong 12-11-2012 10:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by echelon_john (Post 1254855)
Carl,
Based on the photo threads you seem to make a lot of larger frames. Do you feel like this is true? Your larger bikes are beautifully proportioned.

Thanks Echelon John. I always go out of my way to make sure the larger bikes don't look like "special needs" bikes.

I don't feel like I build more larger bikes than anything else. But as a custom Framebuilder I wouldn't be surprised if I do. I've never paid much attention to the frame size because every bike is unique and I always focus on them individually. I couldn't tell you the size of any frame I've made other than my own, but I could tell you all about the customer.

Carl Strong 12-11-2012 10:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rnhood (Post 1255123)
My compliments for a clean, organized and focused shop. Lot of nice looking bikes. Since you ride your creations, how would you describe the basic differences between your metal and carbon bikes?

Thanks!

In a nutshell the carbon bikes are pure race bikes designed to be as light and stiff as possible. The metal bikes have a broader focus and more nuanced when it comes to the way they are tuned for feel.

BumbleBeeDave 12-11-2012 10:44 AM

Carl, I've heard this before . . .
 
. . . about finite service life of aluminum.

I have a Specialized S-works E5 bike from 2003 and just got back from restoration my 1984 Vitus 979, of which I'm the original owner.

Is there any way to judge the "service life" of these frames? Does the service life have to do wih how much they've been ridden, or is it just the properties of the frame material itself?

Also does it have anything to do with corrosion or what conditions the bikes were ridden in? While I did ride my Vitus in the rain, I did the huge majority of riding in Oklahoma in summer months and out in northern California, again only in nice weather.

For we aluminum bike owners . . . do we need to worry about our frames cracking, or give them closer inspections once they are of a certain age? My Vitus will be my nostalgia and show bike. I'm not planning to ride it hard or long. But the S-works is a great riding, stiff frame that really gets up and goes when I stand on it. Do I seriously need to worry about it breaking under use at 9 years old?

Thanks for any light you can shed on this . . .

BBD

Carl Strong 12-11-2012 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by William (Post 1255419)
Hey Carl,

I've seen some photos of the new shop on FB. It's looking nice and really coming together. If I lived a little closer I would offer to give you a hand!:)





William

Thanks William, I could sure use one.

EDS 12-11-2012 01:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Carl Strong (Post 1255432)
Hi EDS, more than anything was that it was very smelly and noisy, just no fun. It's also very hot and a lot different from the steel and Ti. So when the demand started to fade, I took the opportunity to remove AL from my pricing. I haven't built an AL frame for probably five years now and don't miss it a bit.

I might also add that to take full advantage of the attributes of AL is to make a light frame. In doing so, the frame will have a finite service life. If you build a longer life into the frame you start to lose the advantage of AL and may as well go to steel or Ti.

PS, I forgot to answer this part of the question. I wouldn't sell and AL frame now even if begged to. The reason is that it would take a half dozen frames before I'd be back up to speed with AL so I couldn't really produce anything of high enough quality to sell anymore.

Thanks for taking the time to respond Carl. Good luck with the move! I really hope to purchase one of your frames in the future.


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