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View Full Version : Jan Ullrich to race this weekend


cincicycles
06-03-2011, 12:41 PM
Getting a feel for what he could do with a possible comeback? Maybe? (stirring the pot...)

http://www.velonation.com/News/ID/8628/Ullrich-to-take-part-in-four-man-team-time-trial-this-weekend.aspx

:beer:

fiamme red
06-03-2011, 12:48 PM
Maybe he's training for the Tour de Donut. :D

Lovetoclimb
06-03-2011, 12:52 PM
Welcome back Ulrich!

MattTuck
06-03-2011, 12:56 PM
Maybe he's training for the Tour de Donut. :D


ZING!!!


that was a good one.

jpw
06-03-2011, 01:01 PM
2nd in TdF *FIVE* times. If LA gets his palmares revised does Jan become a legend of the sport?

cincicycles
06-03-2011, 01:29 PM
Lance vs Jan was like watching Rocky vs the Russian.

torquer
06-03-2011, 01:36 PM
Maybe he's training for the Tour de Donut. :D
As JFK said, "Ich bin ein Berliner."http://thumbs.ifood.tv/files/images/food/berliner-06.jpg

CunegoFan
06-03-2011, 02:32 PM
Lance vs Jan was like watching Rocky vs the Russian.

...with Armstrong playing the machine-like, medically trained Russian.

Elefantino
06-03-2011, 03:08 PM
Riis doped, admittedly. Ullrich finished second. ... revision ... Ullrich wins his first TdF.

Armstrong doped. Ullrich finished second three times. ... revision ... He wins his third, fourth and fifth TdFs.

He is therefore tied with Merckx, Hinault and Anquetil.

(I'm figuring you can't prove Pantani doped.)

benb
06-03-2011, 03:28 PM
Good for him for trying to stay in shape after he retired.. it doesn't sound like too many pros do that.

Fixed
06-03-2011, 03:31 PM
Riis doped, admittedly. Ullrich finished second. ... revision ... Ullrich wins his first TdF.

Armstrong doped. Ullrich finished second three times. ... revision ... He wins his third, fourth and fifth TdFs.

He is therefore tied with Merckx, Hinault and Anquetil.

(I'm figuring you can't prove Pantani doped.)
he has his fingers crossed
cheers imho

Lovetoclimb
06-03-2011, 03:32 PM
I thought he had delved into the world of German stock-car racing . . . ?

bfd
06-03-2011, 03:33 PM
Maybe he's training for the Tour de Donut. :D

An appropriate announcement as today is National Doughnut Day!!! :hello: :butt: :beer:

How fat are we getting? Do we really need a national day to honor doughnuts?!! :eek: :confused:

Anyways, get yourself to the nearest Krispy Kream as they're giving out FREE DONUTS all day!!! :hello:

Or as Homer would say, "mmmm, donuts..."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8-4P1WPE-Qg

bicycletricycle
06-03-2011, 03:39 PM
Ullrich is my hero, destined for 2nd year after year, he still showed up for a fight.

weiwentg
06-03-2011, 03:54 PM
Riis doped, admittedly. Ullrich finished second. ... revision ... Ullrich wins his first TdF.

Armstrong doped. Ullrich finished second three times. ... revision ... He wins his third, fourth and fifth TdFs.

He is therefore tied with Merckx, Hinault and Anquetil.

(I'm figuring you can't prove Pantani doped.)

Except the police matched some bags at Fuentes' to Ullrich's DNA. Who was third in those years?

spacemen3
06-03-2011, 04:01 PM
Here's a photo of mine from the 2003 TdF of Ullrich getting off the bus. The stage was the Gaillac to Cap' Découverte time-trial. I was intimidated just as a spectator. :) Jan simply crushed everyone that day.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2pxDnc3eYM

biker72
06-03-2011, 04:38 PM
This is an actual shop ride tomorrow.
Maybe Mr. Ullrich is riding in this one.... :)


Tour de Donut 9:14 AM 20 mi.
14-17 mph average Leader assisted Donut Ride Donut shop stop at Renner Rd. and Northstar.
5 minute break and donut. Bring $$$. Slow.

BumbleBeeDave
06-03-2011, 04:51 PM
Last I heard he had paid a huge amount of money to settle charges and close the doping investigation without actually admitting to any of the charges. I would be very surprised if somebody--UCI, prosecutors, etc--didn't try to short circuit this. Seems like it was a pretty firmly established fact that the blood found in Fuentes fridge WAS his . . .

BBD

torquer
06-03-2011, 04:59 PM
Who was third in those years?
This is depressing:
http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/06/news/the-explainer-that-questionable-tour-de-france-podium_176880
1996
1. Bjarne Riis – Known by many in the peloton as “Mr. 60%,” Riis admitted in a 2008 autobiography to have doped his way to the win. Since the confession came 12 years after the fact, the win is still treated as such in the record books.
2. Jan Ullrich – Once briefly suspended for the recreational use of ecstasy, Ullrich was later implicated in the 2006 Operación Puerto scandal and was barred from starting the Tour that year. Ullrich was also the subject of many allegations leveled by former teammates and former staff members in what became known as the “Telekom Affair.” He retired after police claimed to have definitive DNA evidence linking him to blood seized in the Puerto case
3. Richard Virenque – Implicated in the 1998 Festina Affair, Virenque was suspended for six months, but denied involvement in doping until a public confession in 2000.

1997
1. Ullrich (See above)
2. Virenque (See above)
3. Marco Pantani – Although he never tested directly positive for doping, Pantani was ejected from the 1999 Giro d’Italia for having a higher-than-allowable hematocrit level as he was leading the race, just one day before the final stage. The decision eventually destroyed his career and he died of a cocaine overdose in 2004.

1998
1. Pantani (See above)
2. Ullrich (See above)
3. Bobby Julich – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.

1999
1. Lance Armstrong – Armstrong has been the subject of numerous allegations since his first Tour win in 1999. He has always denied those and continues to do so. Armstrong is currently the subject of a federal investigation into doping practices and associated financial issues in the United States. A 2005 re-test of samples from the 1999 showed 16 samples to be positive for EPO. Six of those reportedly belonged to Armstrong. Due to several breaches of laboratory protocols and rules governing the handling of samples, the UCI cleared Armstrong of any wrong doing. Armstrong also tested positive for corticosteroids at the 1999, but later produced a prescription for a topical cream containing corticoids.
2. Alex Zülle – A member of the 1998 Festina team, Zülle admitted to having used EPO over several years. He was allowed to race the 1999 Tour. He retired after the 2004 season.
3. Fernando Escartin – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.

2000
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Ullrich (See above)
3. Joseba Beloki – Implicated in the 2006 Operación Puerto case. He was later cleared by Spanish authorities.

2001
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Ullrich (See above)
3. Beloki (See above)

2002
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Beloki (See above)
3. Raimondas Rumsas – On the final day of the 2002 Tour, Rumsas’ wife Edita was arrested with a variety of steroids, EPO and growth hormone in her car, but claimed they were for her mother-in-law. Rumsas tested positive for EPO at the 2003 Giro d’Italia and was suspended for two years. Both he and his wife were given four-month suspended prison sentences for the 2002 incident.

2003
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Ullrich (See above)
3. Alexander Vinokourov – Tested positive for homologous blood doping at the 2007 Tour de France. Ultimately suspended for two years.

2004
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Andreas Klöden – Implicated in the Telekom affair. No action taken.
3. Ivan Basso – Implicated in the 2006 Operación Puerto scandal, Basso was barred from starting the Tour that year. He denied involvement in blood doping, but eventually admitted to having intended to dope as an explanation for seized blood bags having been linked to him by use of DNA evidence. He was suspended for two years.

2005
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Basso (See above)
3. Ullrich (See above)

2006
1. Óscar Pereiro – Named the winner of the 2006 Tour, after disqualification of Floyd Landis for a testosterone positive, Pereiro, a former teammate of Landis’ was among those riders against whom Landis later leveled charges. Pereiro offered a very narrow and carefully worded (some have said “tepid”) defense against those allegations.
2. Klöden (See above)
3. Carlos Sastre – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.

2007
1. Alberto Contador – Implicated in the 2006 Operación Puerto case. He was later cleared by Spanish authorities. Tested positive for clenbuterol in the 2010 Tour and is currently awaiting resolution of that case.
2. Cadel Evans – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
3. Levi Leipheimer – Leipheimer was suspended for three months for a positive test for ephedrine in 1996. He was accused of doping by his former Gerolsteiner manager Hans-Michael Holczer. Leipheimer denied the allegations and no action has ever resulted.

2008
1. Sastre– No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
2. Evans– No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
3. Bernhard Kohl – Kohl finished third in the Tour and also won the climber’s jersey that year. Following the Tour, he was found to have tested positive for CERA. Kohl later confessed and was suspended for two years. He has since retired from the sport. His 2008 Tour results have been stricken from the record books.

2009
1. Contador (See above)
2. Andy Schleck – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
3. Armstrong (See above)

2010
1. Contador (See above)
2. Schleck– No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
3. Denis Menchov – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.

Germany_chris
06-03-2011, 05:19 PM
Ullrich is my hero, destined for 2nd year after year, he still showed up for a fight.

+1

Mr. Squirrel
06-03-2011, 05:25 PM
This is depressing:
http://velonews.competitor.com/2011/06/news/the-explainer-that-questionable-tour-de-france-podium_176880
1996
1. Bjarne Riis – Known by many in the peloton as “Mr. 60%,” Riis admitted in a 2008 autobiography to have doped his way to the win. Since the confession came 12 years after the fact, the win is still treated as such in the record books.
2. Jan Ullrich – Once briefly suspended for the recreational use of ecstasy, Ullrich was later implicated in the 2006 Operación Puerto scandal and was barred from starting the Tour that year. Ullrich was also the subject of many allegations leveled by former teammates and former staff members in what became known as the “Telekom Affair.” He retired after police claimed to have definitive DNA evidence linking him to blood seized in the Puerto case
3. Richard Virenque – Implicated in the 1998 Festina Affair, Virenque was suspended for six months, but denied involvement in doping until a public confession in 2000.

1997
1. Ullrich (See above)
2. Virenque (See above)
3. Marco Pantani – Although he never tested directly positive for doping, Pantani was ejected from the 1999 Giro d’Italia for having a higher-than-allowable hematocrit level as he was leading the race, just one day before the final stage. The decision eventually destroyed his career and he died of a cocaine overdose in 2004.

1998
1. Pantani (See above)
2. Ullrich (See above)
3. Bobby Julich – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.

1999
1. Lance Armstrong – Armstrong has been the subject of numerous allegations since his first Tour win in 1999. He has always denied those and continues to do so. Armstrong is currently the subject of a federal investigation into doping practices and associated financial issues in the United States. A 2005 re-test of samples from the 1999 showed 16 samples to be positive for EPO. Six of those reportedly belonged to Armstrong. Due to several breaches of laboratory protocols and rules governing the handling of samples, the UCI cleared Armstrong of any wrong doing. Armstrong also tested positive for corticosteroids at the 1999, but later produced a prescription for a topical cream containing corticoids.
2. Alex Zülle – A member of the 1998 Festina team, Zülle admitted to having used EPO over several years. He was allowed to race the 1999 Tour. He retired after the 2004 season.
3. Fernando Escartin – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.

2000
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Ullrich (See above)
3. Joseba Beloki – Implicated in the 2006 Operación Puerto case. He was later cleared by Spanish authorities.

2001
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Ullrich (See above)
3. Beloki (See above)

2002
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Beloki (See above)
3. Raimondas Rumsas – On the final day of the 2002 Tour, Rumsas’ wife Edita was arrested with a variety of steroids, EPO and growth hormone in her car, but claimed they were for her mother-in-law. Rumsas tested positive for EPO at the 2003 Giro d’Italia and was suspended for two years. Both he and his wife were given four-month suspended prison sentences for the 2002 incident.

2003
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Ullrich (See above)
3. Alexander Vinokourov – Tested positive for homologous blood doping at the 2007 Tour de France. Ultimately suspended for two years.

2004
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Andreas Klöden – Implicated in the Telekom affair. No action taken.
3. Ivan Basso – Implicated in the 2006 Operación Puerto scandal, Basso was barred from starting the Tour that year. He denied involvement in blood doping, but eventually admitted to having intended to dope as an explanation for seized blood bags having been linked to him by use of DNA evidence. He was suspended for two years.

2005
1. Armstrong (See above)
2. Basso (See above)
3. Ullrich (See above)

2006
1. Óscar Pereiro – Named the winner of the 2006 Tour, after disqualification of Floyd Landis for a testosterone positive, Pereiro, a former teammate of Landis’ was among those riders against whom Landis later leveled charges. Pereiro offered a very narrow and carefully worded (some have said “tepid”) defense against those allegations.
2. Klöden (See above)
3. Carlos Sastre – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.

2007
1. Alberto Contador – Implicated in the 2006 Operación Puerto case. He was later cleared by Spanish authorities. Tested positive for clenbuterol in the 2010 Tour and is currently awaiting resolution of that case.
2. Cadel Evans – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
3. Levi Leipheimer – Leipheimer was suspended for three months for a positive test for ephedrine in 1996. He was accused of doping by his former Gerolsteiner manager Hans-Michael Holczer. Leipheimer denied the allegations and no action has ever resulted.

2008
1. Sastre– No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
2. Evans– No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
3. Bernhard Kohl – Kohl finished third in the Tour and also won the climber’s jersey that year. Following the Tour, he was found to have tested positive for CERA. Kohl later confessed and was suspended for two years. He has since retired from the sport. His 2008 Tour results have been stricken from the record books.

2009
1. Contador (See above)
2. Andy Schleck – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
3. Armstrong (See above)

2010
1. Contador (See above)
2. Schleck– No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.
3. Denis Menchov – No allegations, no adverse analytical findings.


dear mr. william wiki,

you were there first...

http://forums.thepaceline.net/showthread.php?t=91165&highlight=doping

mr. squirrel

Kines
06-03-2011, 10:24 PM
+1


+2.
I was always rooting for him to upset LA. Killed me to never see it happen.
KN

Kines
06-03-2011, 10:26 PM
Good for him for trying to stay in shape after he retired.. it doesn't sound like too many pros do that.


No one says he's trying to stay in shape. Just doing a charity TTT. I'd love to see a photo of it when it happens.

KN

bicycletricycle
06-03-2011, 10:34 PM
+1

+1,000,000