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my2cents
06-14-2005, 04:16 PM
I copied most of tyler's latest diary entry; i had to edit it down a bit to fit the forum's limitations - I left out thinsg not related to his case. the links is: www.tylerhamilton.com. I am still not convinced of his guilt (nor of his innocence, i guess), but i think there is something very rotten about his whole case and WADA/Pound.


JUNE 2005

COLORADO: Thanks to all of you who continue to check in and send messages of support. I apologize for not updating the site sooner. The last month or so has been kind of a blur.

(deleted)

But we returned home ready to gear up for round #2. The outpouring of support we’ve received has really been tremendous. The number of physicians and researchers who have contacted me since this madness all started, and especially since the ruling in April, has been overwhelming. This support has meant a lot to us. Not only because it has helped shed light on the issues with the HBT test and my results, but because it has also confirmed that we are not grasping at straws questioning the things we have so far.

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The fall out since the verdict in my USADA case has been an interesting read. If we’ve accomplished nothing else in this case, we will have put spotlight on the vanishing twin phenomenon. If you search “vanishing twin” on the internet you’ll discover thousands of websites, and personal experiences about it. But in the mainstream world, I guess it’s still relatively unknown.

With regard to my case, the concept has been called “a sign of the apocalypse” and listed under the “News of the Weird”. The second story was later retracted after it was discovered it wasn’t so weird after all. I’ll be the first to admit that sounds kind of Sci-Fi. But, it’s real and it’s just one of the reasons we presented regarding how a healthy person could have a mixed blood population. One of our goals in the USADA hearing was to point out that the HBT test as it exists, is fatally flawed. The central problem with this test is that it makes the leap that a mixed blood population (detected through the method called flow cytometry), is there only because of a mismatched homologous blood transfusion. The defect in that theory is that flow cytometry, can indicate a mixed population when implemented correctly, but it doesn’t tell you why the mixed population is there.

In speaking with a number of experts from leading universities, hospitals, blood banks and laboratories around the world, we have been told that there are a number of reasons a person can have mixed blood populations. But this was never taken into consideration while the HBT test was being developed. In fact, there was never any sort of validation study conducted to support this test. We think this sets a very dangerous precedent. A new test would never be accepted by the medical community without rigorous scrutiny. It’s my contention that the standard should not be any different within the anti-doping community.

If this sounds like a diversion on my part, take this into account – I did not transfuse blood from another person, yet I’ve been told I have a mixed blood population. So the question is – how did my samples garner these results? WADA, the IOC, UCI and USADA all say it is up to me to explain this and that I am guilty until I prove myself innocent with my own resources and my own research. Yet they have refused to share the standard operating procedure for the test that would help me try and duplicate their alleged results and/or explain them.

It’s even been suggested I do complex testing on my family members and myself. This raises the question of how a test that requires an athlete to go to such an extreme ever got approved. What if their parents are deceased? What if they were adopted? Are they guilty simply because they can’t conduct their own research? If I proceed with this research does it set a standard for all athletes who test positive? This is an extraordinary and unrealistic burden to place on an athlete.

USADA has recently gone on record stating that they offered to test me for chimerism. I would like to put that offer in context.

I was told on September 16, 2004 that my tests indicated a mixed blood population. Immediately, I requested three things; a retest, a DNA test and that another sample be drawn and tested independently. All of those requests were refused.

At no time prior to my hearing that started February 27, 2005, did anyone ever ask me if I knew why my samples could indicate a “mixed blood population”. Instead my case took on a life of it’s own within 4 days, through a leak to the media on September 20, 2004. There was a rush to sensationalize my case, even before the B Samples could be tested. At no time did I ever feel as though anyone but me was interested in how I could have allegedly tested positive.

Then, just days before my hearing was set to begin, USADA contacted my lawyer and asked him if I was going to defend myself by stating I’m chimeric. We thought the timing and context of this question was odd, and asked if they were prepared to prove I wasn’t chimeric. USADA replied in writing that they knew there is “no test to prove chimerism”.

In the five and a half months from when I was told I had allegedly tested positive and my hearing, no one offered to help me get to the bottom of those results. Until USADA offered to test me for something they contended there is no test for. It’s a scenario that makes no sense even today. Yet it gives them the opportunity to say publicly, that they offered to test me for chimerism.

In light of my own experience, I was unsettled by recent news reports featuring a confidential WADA memo about Nandrolone testing. This confidential memo was sent to labs around the world conducting the test. In it, WADA apparently admits, they may have accused innocent athletes of testing positive, when they never did anything wrong.

This is sensitive issue for me, because the single peer review ever written to support the HBT test states that mixed populations under 5% should not be called positive because below this level, other factors could be influencing the result.

One of USADA’s witnesses, who testified against me, went on record that he didn’t agree with the peer review. Which is astonishing, because on the one hand WADA and the research team have accepted the peer review to green light the test, but on the other, have decided to dismiss it while applying the test. (My alleged mixed populations from the Vuelta were around 1%.)

I don’t want to read a year from now, that WADA is circulating a memo acknowledging there are a number of reasons for mixed red cell populations in healthy adults, and the 5% threshold for the HBT test should now be applied.

What’s more concerning, is the Nandrolone and HBT tests are not isolated issues.

In the current issue of Outside Magazine, Don Catlin, director of the UCLA Olympic Analytical Laboratory, widely considered the gold standard of the anti-doping community, was interviewed about the shortcomings of the current anti-doping system.

The article touches on a number of issues hampering the development of useful and “bulletproof” tests, one being “dime store research budgets”.

German cell biologist Hans Heid is quoted declaring the first EPO test “error prone” and suggested to WADA; “the development of a new urinary EPO test should be encouraged and funded.” In addition, “Heid says WADA authorities told him they knew the test was flawed but were happy to have a test at all.” The article goes on to say; “Catlin believes the EPO test was introduced prematurely.” And finishes with; “WADA clearly saw the need for refinements, too; Last year, four years after the test was first used, WADA issued a refined protocol for performing it.”

The Human Growth Hormone test reportedly introduced in 2004 was also discussed. “After a decade of research, experts don’t even agree on whether or not a validated, usable HGH test exists. WADA says it does. Catlin and other sources say it doesn’t.” Dr. Catlin went on to say; “there’s a big gap between having a test and having a bulletproof test.”

If I accomplish nothing else with my fight, and my appeal, I hope I’m able to shed light on the fact that the anti doping community needs to be held to the same standard the athletes are. If mistakes are made, they should be acknowledged. If research is incomplete, there should be people and processes in place demanding better for the athletes. If the application of a test varies from the initial supporting research, the test should be halted until the variance is defended through additional research.

I have said all along, that I am on a greater mission than just clearing my name. Someone has to stand up for athletes who compete in non-unionized sports, who don’t have a line of defense in place to require better on their behalf. These are the very athletes who most likely lack the resources and support needed to get to the truth. I can’t tell you how many of them have encouraged me to keep fighting. Many have noted that if they found themselves in my position it would mean the end of their career. Not because they were guilty, but primarily because they would not be able to afford to defend themselves.

So on we go. My appeal was filed with CAS on May 27. Per UCI rules, USADA would have had 20 days after that to review our brief and file their response. However, USADA asked CAS for an extension until July 11, which was granted. So the process will take a little longer than we originally expected. At this point, we are hoping for a hearing date by late July. I will keep you posted as we learn more.

Thanks for checking in. And Thanks for reading.

Needs Help
06-14-2005, 05:27 PM
i had to edit it down a bit to fit the forum's limitations
You can make 2 or 3 posts in a row if you need to.

In my opinion, all cyclists should be made to take a lie detector test, which asks:

1) Have you ever doped?

2) Have you ever seen anyone else dope and not reported it?

If the rider does not pass the lie detector for either question, they cannot race. You don't even have to ban them, just prevent them from entering that race, and they can try again next week.

If a lie detector test is good enough for "Do You Want to Marry My Dad", then it should be good enough for the UCI.

boulder_courier
06-14-2005, 05:39 PM
Lie detector test results are not admissible in a court of law. Let's stick to tests that use science.

dirtdigger88
06-14-2005, 05:45 PM
I know lets take a lesson from our friend in Salem- lets tie a rope to the accused's neck and the other end to a large rock- Then throw the accused into a large body of water- with the rock. If the accused sinks- they are human- and should be absolved of all accusations. If they rise to the surface and begin to fly around- RUN!!!!! Cuz the sh*t is about to hit the fan-

Jason

Ozz
06-14-2005, 06:04 PM
I know lets take a lesson from our friend in Salem- lets tie a rope to the accused's neck and the other end to a large rock- Then throw the accused into a large body of water- with the rock. If the accused sinks- they are human- and should be absolved of all accusations. If they rise to the surface and begin to fly around- RUN!!!!! Cuz the sh*t is about to hit the fan-

Jason
Sir Bedevere: What makes you think she's a witch?

Peasant: Well she turned me into a newt.

Sir Bedevere: A newt?

Peasant: ...I got better.

Crowd: BURN HER ANYWAY.

:rolleyes:

dirtdigger88
06-14-2005, 06:12 PM
:p

Jason

Kevin
06-14-2005, 08:48 PM
I know lets take a lesson from our friend in Salem- lets tie a rope to the accused's neck and the other end to a large rock- Then throw the accused into a large body of water- with the rock. If the accused sinks- they are human- and should be absolved of all accusations. If they rise to the surface and begin to fly around- RUN!!!!! Cuz the sh*t is about to hit the fan-

Jason

Have you been in a New York Court recently ;)

Kevin

Spinsistah
06-14-2005, 09:37 PM
Just spray the accused with water and if he/she melts, it's all over. Remember...."I'll get you and your little dog too.........cackle". Worked on that one. :)

Andreu
06-15-2005, 03:16 AM
1) Have you ever doped?

2) Have you ever seen anyone else dope and not reported it?

If the rider does not pass the lie detector for either question, they cannot race.



There would be no one left to ride professional races.

Climb01742
06-15-2005, 05:16 AM
the michael jackson jury is now available to decide guilt or innocence...or maybe just whether they like someone of not...just tell tyler not to snap his fingers at any anti-doping officials. ;)

BumbleBeeDave
06-15-2005, 07:04 AM
. . . this is more about the UCI’s and WADA’s reputations and egos than it is about Tyler’s guilt or innocence. They see their “mission” as so important that they really don’t care who they destroy in order to accomplish it. I still don’t think he did it and I hope very hard that the CAS agrees. In any event, he’s lost most of this season racing. I only wish I could find all this as humorous as you folks seem to. In my book, destroying someone’s career--and their finances as they defend themselves--is simply not funny.

bBDave

Climb01742
06-15-2005, 09:52 AM
dave, i don't think anyone here finds tyler's plight funny. but in the face of a hugely stupid governing body and process -- over which we peons have no influence -- what are our choices? rail and get mad...to what end? or just make light of another example of life's absurdity? to scream or to laugh?

slowgoing
06-15-2005, 11:18 AM
Tyler may have a rough road ahead of him. Now that he has raised this “vanishing twin” defense, if he ever races again, officials will probably expect him to always test positive for a mixed cell population. This should be no problem if he did have a vanishing twin, but if the prior test results were the result of doping, he may have to continue doping to get the same mixed cell population results and maintain his credibility and reputation. In addition, it appears that his only chance of racing again within the two year suspension period is to get the present test thrown out or modified to allow for some baseline level of mixed cells. Otherwise his results will stand, and he will face the same penalty when he starts racing after the suspension is over and his test results again come back positive.

Bruce K
06-15-2005, 11:23 AM
Just to put a slightly different face on all of this....

Monday evening was the Essex County Velo / Manchester Police Bicycle Rodeo & Kids Race supported by The Tyler Hamilton Foundation.

This involves helmet checks, bike inspections, a bike rodeo/safety course, and some kids MTB type races of short duration and simple terrain.

The surprise starter, trophy presenter, and general helper outer was Tyler! Besides chatting with kids too young to realize who he was and parents who have no real interest in cycling so they weren't all agog either, Tyler was apparently a real low key kind of guy.

He encouraged the kids, helped with little things, presented trophies, and when the fun stuff was over, he helped take down course markers, roll up caution tape, and do anything else required to make the event come off without a hitch.

I personally hope this issue with WADA gets settled and he can get on with his racing. Either way, I will continue to support his efforts on behalf of the MS Society and the efforts of the THF and its involvement with kids cycling programs.

BK

Ozz
06-15-2005, 12:18 PM
. . . I only wish I could find all this as humorous as you folks seem to. In my book, destroying someone’s career--and their finances as they defend themselves--is simply not funny...

bBDave
Dave,

I don't think it's funny either...

If you recall the monty python scene i quote from...the crowd wants to find the witch guilty, regardless of the evidence. When Sir Bedevere offers a "scientific" way to prove whether she is a witch, the method is flawed (does she really weigh the same as a duck or is the scale rigged?) and she is found guilty anyway...draw your own parallels with Tylers situation.

Just pointing out the absurdity of the situation...

LegendRider
06-15-2005, 12:20 PM
In previous comments, Tyler has talked about the mysterious man who said that two Phonak riders would test positive and attempted to extort money. Yet, that doesn't seem to be part of his defense. Why not? If I were in his shoes, I'd be all over that! Is he working on this with private detectives behind the scenes? Very strange.

Skrawny
06-15-2005, 12:24 PM
I agree with slowgoing, if he is ever absolved of guilt, then he had better always test for 1% mixed blood. Otherwise he would have to come up with the "Vanishing vanishing-twin hypothesis." Flow cytometry is some pretty sensitive stuff, however, I don't know what the low end of sensitivity of this partcular test is; if 1% is at the limit of detectability, then that would give him an out. It would be curious, though, if every other test was 0%...
-s

dirtdigger88
06-15-2005, 12:27 PM
ya but Tyler NEVER used drugs- just like everyone else- :no:

Jason

Needs Help
06-15-2005, 06:25 PM
In previous comments, Tyler has talked about the mysterious man who said that two Phonak riders would test positive and attempting to extort money. Yet, that doesn't seem to be part of his defense. Why not? If I were in his shoes, I'd be all over that! Is he working on this with private dectives behind the scenes? Very strange.
I think he hired the same detective who is helping O.J. Simpson find out who really killed Nicole Brown Simpson and Ronald Goldman.

Kevin
06-15-2005, 07:35 PM
Is Tyler's vanishing twin a one armed man? If so, it would make for a great television show.

Kevin

Dr. Doofus
06-16-2005, 07:31 AM
.

Ozz
06-16-2005, 08:37 AM
.

Tom
06-16-2005, 09:31 AM
.