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View Full Version : SPD-R pedals? Anyone still use them?


BdaGhisallo
02-04-2004, 12:11 PM
Anybody still riding the old dura ace pedals, those prior to the Lance pedal? I have had the spd-sl now for a year and am still bothered by the lateral movement ( not the 6deg angular float which I like). I am considering going with the old spd-r pedals, for which I can get a 6deg cleat that will allow no lateral movement.

I tried them briefly a few years back, but not long enough to form a thorough impression.

Any thoughts?


I have tried the fixed cleat on the new spd-sl pedals and concluded that I like a little angular float with no lateral movement.


thanks

Sandy
02-04-2004, 01:53 PM
If I may add this question: What is the greatest degree of float on SPD pedals? I am doing spin classes using toe clips and a VERY old and poor pair of cheap bicycle shoes (no cleats). I use Look arc cleats with 9 degrees of float for outside riding and am considering taking an old pair of cycling shoes, that I saved from the trash, and putting on cheap SPD cleats, so that I can use them in spin classes. I do not want, however, to take any chance in hurting my kness with pedals and float that could cause me any harm.

BdaGhisallo, I don't understand what you mean by saying that you "can get 6deg cleat that will allow no lateral movement". Isn't the 6 degrees of float the lateral movement that your cleats allow?


Sandy

BdaGhisallo
02-04-2004, 02:02 PM
By lateral float I mean float such that your shoe is closer or farther away from the crank, changing the 'q' measurement. The angular float is such that your heel can move back and forth while your toes stay where they are, in terms of distance from the crank. ( most don't pivot from the toe though, although the idea is the same. I count angular float as being float about a point that remains at the same distance away from the crank. Lateral float allows that point to move closer or further from the crank arm)

Time has it and advertises it as 5mm. The new impacts allow that to be adjusted to 2.5mm. The spd-sl are not advertised as having lateral float, only 6deg angular float, but it's certainly there.

Sandy
02-04-2004, 09:20 PM
Excellent explanation. Now I understand. Look CX-7 and Look CX-6 both have the ability to change the Q factor, by 10 mm. The CX-7 allows you to angle your foot in or out also.

Sandy

timto
02-05-2004, 10:05 AM
I have the SPD-R and I like them alot. Much more than my profits I have now actually. The shimano cleat is metal, has walking 'nubs' and I find the engagment and retention much more positive than the profits. This might be against some peoples preferences but I like to REALLY know I'm in a pedal. The profits I have tend to have play even though the tensions is up, the cleats wear quick and I felt a difference when i mounted them in terms of cleat height. I'm not sure if this makes a real world difference but my preference is to the lower stack 'feel' of the SPD-R. I've kept them and plan on using them again.

Also I've noticed many of the track riders locally (Calgary) have them on their track bikes - I think this speaks to their security and positive engagement feel. They are the only clipless pedal I see regularly at the track where toe clips still have their place...

I've read lots of negative things about other people's experiences about the SPD-R but I have only positive things to say about them. Not a pedal maybe if you like nice smooth float - I use my rigid or if you want something super easy to get in and out of.

Cheers

Tim

jerk
02-05-2004, 03:00 PM
spd-rs suck. miserabally small platform, always seemt to hang upside down and tough to get in and out of. in their defense they are better than campy pro-fits which is not saying much....the only idiots who still use them are track racers. they use them because they are more aero...but then again they also will wrap them in saran wrap... (the jerk knows these things)

the new spd-sl is a fine pedal. don't like the float? (it has no side to side play, what you are feeling is the float) use a fixed cleat and modify it to provied float on the plane that you want it.

BdaGhisallo
02-06-2004, 09:10 AM
I beg to differ on the notion of spd-sl lateral float. It is there. It may disappear after the cleat wears a little but it certainly is there with new cleats. Zinn noted it in his review and I have seen numerous other references to it.

That said, I appreciate your advice. In all other respects the spd-sl pedals are marvelous. I only wonder why they add this lat float when none of their other pedals have had in the past.

jbay
02-08-2004, 04:49 PM
jerk wrote
spd-rs suck. miserabally small platform, always seemt to hang upside down and tough to get in and out of.


I would certainly love to have been a fly on the wall at Shimano when they were making the decisions that led to the SPD-R and, after that, the SPD-SL pedals. But anyway...

The only questionable "feature" of SPD-Rs in my mind was the (then) new and unnecessary attachment bolt pattern. Given that most racing shoes these days use replaceable inserts to provide the surface that cleats attach to, it isn't (or wasn't) the end of the world, but annoying nonetheless.

I frankly fail to see how the platform could be described as miserably small. Its platform is a little smaller than, say, a LOOK's, but the SPD-R's cleat-pedal interface is still rock solid. And given that mountain bikers can race 24hour events with regular SPDs (which definitely have a smaller platform), if the sole of one's shoe is stiff enough and if the cleat-pedal interface is stable (make that shoe-cleat-pedal interface in the case of regular SPDs), how much does the platform size matter?

Personally speaking, I haven't had a problem with the pedals hanging in any orientation but vertically. It would seem like an issue with overly tight bearings if the pedal did hang upside down etc. as opposed to an issue with the pedal design. This is a problem that could equally afflict the SPD-SL in that case.

I also haven't had a problem with entry and exit. I do, however, periodically put a drop of oil on the rear of the cleat, on the nub that allows one to release from the pedal. And did I mention that all cleats should be metal??? <I'm not into smilies, but you can imagine one here>

-- John