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View Full Version : Wheels for an Ottrott - Rider at 210 lbs.


BAL
11-05-2010, 07:47 AM
I have had my Ottrott for just over one year and have put about 3,000 miles on it. I love the bike and couldn't be happier with it. Wanting wheels that would have the bling factor for such a nice ride, I purchased Zipp 404's and have had no problems with the 404s. However, I see a lot of comments on the forums about the low spoke count on wheels like the 404's not being appropriate for my weight. Am I riding on borrowed time? Should I expect to experience spoke breakage soon as spokes are over stressed or the spokes fatigue given my weight? I do get some brake rub on occasion when I am pushing hard on the pedals uphill so I assume I am flexing the wheel a bit. Although most of my riding is non-hilly.

Do I need Zipp 404's? No, I don't. I am in my mid-50's and do almost all of my riding solo for fitness purposes averaging about 18 mph on typical 20 to 30 mile rides with occasional weekend or charity rides of 60+ miles.

I originally purchased the Zipp's for the bling factor with the Ottrott and I must admit I do like the look. I am ready to get another set of wheels to have a second set on hand or to be primary and I am assuming I should look into custom handbuilt wheels.

Any recommendations on wheel builders focused on riders of my weight and riding style? Any comments on wheel build configurations that might satisfy the bling factor on a set of wheels with a higher spoke count?

Dave B
11-05-2010, 08:04 AM
I think you would be fine. In fact most wheels save for super light climbing wheels would work. I think if you are doing crazy bunny hops or aiming for pot holes those wheels (Zipp's or whatever) would work fine. There is nothign wrong with higher spoke count wheels in the 32 or 36 three cross would be sufficeint. Just stay away from super low profile carbon rims. They probably would be OK, but I would rather stay away from OK. If you beat up on wheels then I say go with hand builts as the collective parts are easier to replace/repair.

AngryScientist
11-05-2010, 08:23 AM
doesnt zipp make a cyclocross/clyde build for the 404s and 303s? if you're worried maybe sell the set you have and look into a set of them?

oldguy00
11-05-2010, 08:53 AM
Most people I know who own Zipps have had them break at some point, regardless of body weight. Nothing personal against Zipp, just a fact.
If you are getting new wheels anyway, for a similar cost to the Zipps, you might be able to get a really nice set of Edge(Enve) custom built deep carbon wheels that will be light and built to withstand your weight.
If you are not concerned about the weight of the wheels, then there is the newer Mavic Cosmic Carbone SLR's that have been on bonktown for $999 several times lately. They would be pretty bombproof, and are really nice looking.

All that said, if you are buying your Zipps from an authorized dealer/shop, then you should have warranty coverage and have no problem getting them replaced when they break. But if you buy them off a forum, ebay, etc., no such warranty (at least I wouldn't count on it).
Cheers

oldpotatoe
11-05-2010, 09:02 AM
I have had my Ottrott for just over one year and have put about 3,000 miles on it. I love the bike and couldn't be happier with it. Wanting wheels that would have the bling factor for such a nice ride, I purchased Zipp 404's and have had no problems with the 404s. However, I see a lot of comments on the forums about the low spoke count on wheels like the 404's not being appropriate for my weight. Am I riding on borrowed time? Should I expect to experience spoke breakage soon as spokes are over stressed or the spokes fatigue given my weight? I do get some brake rub on occasion when I am pushing hard on the pedals uphill so I assume I am flexing the wheel a bit. Although most of my riding is non-hilly.

Do I need Zipp 404's? No, I don't. I am in my mid-50's and do almost all of my riding solo for fitness purposes averaging about 18 mph on typical 20 to 30 mile rides with occasional weekend or charity rides of 60+ miles.

I originally purchased the Zipp's for the bling factor with the Ottrott and I must admit I do like the look. I am ready to get another set of wheels to have a second set on hand or to be primary and I am assuming I should look into custom handbuilt wheels.

Any recommendations on wheel builders focused on riders of my weight and riding style? Any comments on wheel build configurations that might satisfy the bling factor on a set of wheels with a higher spoke count?

Any decent 'wheelbuilder', not just a guy that builds wheels, should be VERY concerned about the rider and their needs when designing a wheelset. Yes there are MO places that will build anything for anybody...I see those wrecks often, but a wheelbuilder worth his salt will 'design' the wheel to suit the needs of the rider and be reliable.

If ya gotta have bling..DT hubs, Reynolds rims, designed for you in terms of rim, tubie(I recommend that) or clincher, spoke count and type, etc. BUT remember wheels are mostly there to get you there.

OR DT rims, DT, shimano or Campagnolo hubs, built well.

fjaws
11-05-2010, 09:11 AM
Any decent 'wheelbuilder', not just a guy that builds wheels, should be VERY concerned about the rider and their needs when designing a wheelset.


Ok, seriously..... Considering all the facts and listening to this potential customer, your recommendation for a 50+ rider, riding recreationally for fitness, is to go with Tubulars?

I think it's time to hand in your "decent wheelbuilder" ID badge.

:crap:

oldpotatoe
11-05-2010, 09:16 AM
Ok, seriously..... Considering all the facts and listening to this potential customer, your recommendation for a 50+ rider, riding recreationally for fitness, is to go with Tubulars?

I think it's time to hand in your "decent wheelbuilder" ID badge.

:crap:

If using carbon rims, the tubular is the way to go, when I suggested tubulars BUT-----

I ride tubulars everyday, I am 59 years old and the very definition of a 'recreational' cyclist. I ride Campagnolo Omega Stradas laced to C-Record freewheel hubs, 36 hole, laced 3 cross with DT comps and brass nipps, altho I have about 8 others.

Tubulars get such a bad rap. They are not a black art or smoke and mirrors. I can teach somebody how to glue tubies on w/o any mess in 10 minutes. They are FAR less messy than trying to make some wheel tubeless with the 'goop' involved with that. I do add goop to my tubulars, but even w/o it, I get very few flats..maybe 2 per year of 5000 or so miles of riding per year.

Don't want to speak for him but I think I am too conservative of a wheelbuilder for him to be my customer. I am concerned about reliability, design, fail in the 'make them blingy' arena.

William
11-05-2010, 09:19 AM
Aerospoke. ;)





William

ergott
11-05-2010, 09:27 AM
Ok, seriously..... Considering all the facts and listening to this potential customer, your recommendation for a 50+ rider, riding recreationally for fitness, is to go with Tubulars?

I think it's time to hand in your "decent wheelbuilder" ID badge.

:crap:

Wow. Recommending tubulars is never a bad idea. I have no clincher love.

Chad Engle
11-05-2010, 09:32 AM
Wow. Recommending tubulars is never a bad idea. I have no clincher love.


My new band name.

oldpotatoe
11-05-2010, 09:34 AM
Wow. Recommending tubulars is never a bad idea. I have no clincher love.

Like I said, tubulars are feared by most, most of whom have never used them, glued them on, etc...

HenryA
11-05-2010, 09:52 AM
If standard hubs aren't blingy enough, get some DT 240 hubs laced with 32 light weight spokes to the best standard rim you can think of. That might be a DT rim or Mavic or from the talk here Kinlin. Put 25s of your choice on and ride.

I'm about the same size and I've ridden this type of wheel for many, many years with no problems. Build yourself a new set every 4 or 5 years or so. Just because you can, it won't be because you have to. Sell the old ones to someone here who will ride the rest of the very long life out of them.

oldguy00
11-05-2010, 10:22 AM
If standard hubs aren't blingy enough, get some DT 240 hubs laced with 32 light weight spokes to the best standard rim you can think of. That might be a DT rim or Mavic or from the talk here Kinlin. Put 25s of your choice on and ride.

....

Boring!
He wouldn't be riding Zipps if he wanted a 'standard' wheel.
:beer:

Z3c
11-05-2010, 10:25 AM
Like I said, tubulars are feared by most, most of whom have never used them, glued them on, etc...

Ding! That is so on the money..

I ride tubies daily; have for many years. I don't own clinchers other than my mtb.

spartacus
11-05-2010, 11:19 AM
If using carbon rims, the tubular is the way to go, when I suggested tubulars BUT-----

I ride tubulars everyday, I am 59 years old and the very definition of a 'recreational' cyclist. I ride Campagnolo Omega Stradas laced to C-Record freewheel hubs, 36 hole, laced 3 cross with DT comps and brass nipps, altho I have about 8 others.

Tubulars get such a bad rap. They are not a black art or smoke and mirrors. I can teach somebody how to glue tubies on w/o any mess in 10 minutes. They are FAR less messy than trying to make some wheel tubeless with the 'goop' involved with that. I do add goop to my tubulars, but even w/o it, I get very few flats..maybe 2 per year of 5000 or so miles of riding per year.

Don't want to speak for him but I think I am too conservative of a wheelbuilder for him to be my customer. I am concerned about reliability, design, fail in the 'make them blingy' arena.

What's a good source of information for 'how to' with tubulars? I've always been tempted, but...... no knowledge of how to.

What's does one do when puncturing a tubular 20 miles from home?

HenryA
11-05-2010, 11:27 AM
Boring!
He wouldn't be riding Zipps if he wanted a 'standard' wheel.
:beer:

Not boring except that you get to ride your bike instead of worrying with wheel problems. Good boring.

And then there's the part where many folks-in-the-know recognize a fine set of high end hand built wheels on nice hubs to be waaaay more desirable than any "marketing award winning" aero/rocket science/ultralight/shiny graphics/matte black wheelset.

oldguy00
11-05-2010, 11:43 AM
Not boring except that you get to ride your bike instead of worrying with wheel problems. Good boring.

And then there's the part where many folks-in-the-know recognize a fine set of high end hand built wheels on nice hubs to be waaaay more desirable than any "marketing award winning" aero/rocket science/ultralight/shiny graphics/matte black wheelset.

Blah blah. Folks 'in the know'.....lol.

EVERY time someone asks for wheel recommendations, someone always chimes in with "Well, all you need is a good hub and an aluminum rim and a super experienced builder...."

OK, yes, if your goal is to simply have a reliable and repairable wheel, then yes, all you need is a set of Ultegra hubs, DT spokes, and just about any set of aluminum rims you can find. I own a set myself (DA hubs, Mavic Mach2 rims). They are a great go to wheel for my rides in bad weather, indoor trainer, etc.
For my general road riding and racing, I (and a lot of others) get much more enjoyment out of riding a nice set of carbon aero wheels. So do a lot of my friends. None of us have ever been 'stranded' because of our wheels.

There is nothing wrong with a standard set of wheels.....but don't push them on other people with false info.

fjaws
11-05-2010, 11:48 AM
Search the forum. I believe it was Tootall that posted links to some good info w/ photos on how to fold a spare tire.

Basically, you'll need to carry a spare tire. Some prefer previously glued ones so they'll have a bit of glue already on them. You'll have to remove the punctured tire, which may be a bit of work depending on how well it was glued and how long it's been on, and replace it with the spare that you're carrying. With or without glue on the spare, once installed and inflated it'll get you home safely as long as you're not carving the corners on your favorite 40+ mph descent. Once you get it home, glue up another tire.

Alternatively, use your cell phone and skip straight to glue up another tire. :D

oldpotatoe
11-05-2010, 11:52 AM
Blah blah. Folks 'in the know'.....lol.

EVERY time someone asks for wheel recommendations, someone always chimes in with "Well, all you need is a good hub and an aluminum rim and a super experienced builder...."

OK, yes, if your goal is to simply have a reliable and repairable wheel, then yes, all you need is a set of Ultegra hubs, DT spokes, and just about any set of aluminum rims you can find. I own a set myself (DA hubs, Mavic Mach2 rims). They are a great go to wheel for my rides in bad weather, indoor trainer, etc.
For my general road riding and racing, I (and a lot of others) get much more enjoyment out of riding a nice set of carbon aero wheels. So do a lot of my friends. None of us have ever been 'stranded' because of our wheels.

There is nothing wrong with a standard set of wheels.....but don't push them on other people with false info.

Glad you have not been stranded but more than a little of my wheel work is truing or repairing wheels and a lot of them are carbon. A wheelset that weighs 1100-1200 grams for a .1 offa ton rider and how reliable they are compared to a wheelset better designed for that same .1 offa ton rider is not false info.

The marketing of how much 400 grams effects the performance of a 90,000+ gram rider is the false info.

If ya like your carbon wheels, good for you but like they say, no such thing as a free lunch.

spartacus
11-05-2010, 11:54 AM
Alternatively, use your cell phone and skip straight to glue up another tire. :D

The European 'taxi tire' solution - nice! :beer:

fjaws
11-05-2010, 11:59 AM
The European 'taxi tire' solution - nice! :beer:

Not MY personal choice, but it is 2010 almost '11 so it has to be said. :beer:

djg
11-05-2010, 12:30 PM
What's a good source of information for 'how to' with tubulars? I've always been tempted, but...... no knowledge of how to.

What's does one do when puncturing a tubular 20 miles from home?

Likely you can find some good information just by doing a search on this board. I think that the Park Tools web site is a decent place to look too.

A puncture on the road? If it's small, it might be taken care of with sealant. I've had decent luck with Vittoria pit stop, but others have reported mixed results. There are other choices.

If it's big, or there's a bigger problem with the tire, you pull the tire, install a spare tire (which you had under your saddle), inflate, and ride. It's possible to repair a tire on the road (or on the side of the road) if you have a tubular patch kit, but it takes some time.

BAL
11-05-2010, 12:32 PM
Thanks to all for the comments on my original posting. I appreciate the thoughts on the tubular option; but, it seems to me staying with clinchers is the choice for me.

I will likely buy a set of custom wheels designed for my specific riding situation and weight and the wheels will likely have a higher spoke count.

Does anyone have a comment on what I might notice as a change in my riding experience going from the 16 front and 20 rear spoke count of the Zipp 404's to a wheel set with a higher spoke count be it either alum or carbon rims? Would I notice any difference in ride quality?

endosch2
11-05-2010, 01:08 PM
Glad you have not been stranded but more than a little of my wheel work is truing or repairing wheels and a lot of them are carbon. A wheelset that weighs 1100-1200 grams for a .1 offa ton rider and how reliable they are compared to a wheelset better designed for that same .1 offa ton rider is not false info.

The marketing of how much 400 grams effects the performance of a 90,000+ gram rider is the false info.

If ya like your carbon wheels, good for you but like they say, no such thing as a free lunch.

I dont really buy the endless drivel about how great old school wheels are. The reason the old wheels are so servicable is because they need service a lot. Since riding pre-built mavic and reynolds wheels I have never touched a wheel for anything in the last 5 seasons. My spoked retro grouchy wheels need a truing all the time. I really wish people would quit suggesting that pre-made wheels are just about marketing, there is a real benefit to them.

oldpotatoe
11-05-2010, 01:28 PM
I dont really buy the endless drivel about how great old school wheels are. The reason the old wheels are so servicable is because they need service a lot. Since riding pre-built mavic and reynolds wheels I have never touched a wheel for anything in the last 5 seasons. My spoked retro grouchy wheels need a truing all the time. I really wish people would quit suggesting that pre-made wheels are just about marketing, there is a real benefit to them.

http://www.menswearhouse.com

http://www.wwchan.com/

" The reason the old wheels are so servicable is because they need service a lot."

Really?

I'm .1 offa ton and never true my wheels..old school as they are.

I think for that $1000(since you mentioned Mavic), you could get a better hub, no aluminum spokes, no propriatary parts that mavic won't support in the future(26h Helium front).

For that (put lots of $ here) Reynolds, it ought to stay true.

I'm tapping outta this one tho.

oldguy00
11-05-2010, 01:41 PM
http://www.menswearhouse.com

http://www.wwchan.com/

Excellent point.......you can buy a $300 wheelset with parts that have been around for 20 years (like those boring suits), or you can pay big $$ and get a sweet pair of 'Harry Rosen' bling carbon wheels.

I like your style.


;) :D

staggerwing
11-05-2010, 01:52 PM
Does anyone have a comment on what I might notice as a change in my riding experience going from the 16 front and 20 rear spoke count of the Zipp 404's to a wheel set with a higher spoke count be it either alum or carbon rims? Would I notice any difference in ride quality?

If you stand to crunch a hill, you might notice the higher spoke count wheels feeling a little more solid underfoot. I'm right around 200, and really only cycle for commuting and fun, I've had some lower spoke count wheels rub the brakes under heavy load. Not inspiring in the least.

As far as overall ride quality, buy a quality tire, and fine tune by playing around with air pressure. I run a 28mm front and 32mm rear on my commuter, and even at my weight, only run 85-90 psi. My more fun rig has PR2's in 25, which are positively cloud like at 95 psi, even on a stout wheel set.

Oldpotatoes comments about carbon tubies make a ton of sense. A tubular rim is a closed box section, which from an engineering perspective, is extremely strong for a given weight of material. The open-C shape of a clincher, is a far less efficient use of material. A similar strength clincher wheel set will certainly be heavier than a tubular set.

Dream set for me would be mid-section, carbon tubulars, 24f/28r (maybe 28f/32r, if I was feeling less confident/more reasonable), on White Industry hubs with C-xray spokes and either 25mm Conti Competitions or 24mm Vittoria Corsa EVO CG Paves.

jeo99
11-05-2010, 02:07 PM
I do not ride carbon as I cannot stand the noise everytime I cross a seam in the road! We got a lot of seams, cracks and holes in MI! When riding in a group it sounds like a herd of buffalo coming. IMHO
I do like tubbies, just not on carbon.

:beer:

Pete Serotta
11-05-2010, 02:10 PM
Glad you have not been stranded but more than a little of my wheel work is truing or repairing wheels and a lot of them are carbon. A wheelset that weighs 1100-1200 grams for a .1 offa ton rider and how reliable they are compared to a wheelset better designed for that same .1 offa ton rider is not false info.

The marketing of how much 400 grams effects the performance of a 90,000+ gram rider is the false info.

If ya like your carbon wheels, good for you but like they say, no such thing as a free lunch.


and nothing is ever free....... :crap: how true!!!


PETE

tribuddha
11-05-2010, 11:17 PM
hey I'm one of those big guys.. 6-5 240# and I have zipp 202 on my Classique..
and I stand and hammer on the hills ( cmon I'm 240 freakin pounds!!)
how would I know if my brakes are rubbing?? would I hear it or feel it?? I have the same question about the frame.. big boy tubing etc but I have read on this forum that a bike that is too compliant might have a sloppy rear end and the chain might rub?? would I hear or feel that??
thanks for the help..

BAL
11-06-2010, 01:06 AM
When I have my brake pads set at the "normal" distance from the rim, I get brake rub as I am standing on the pedals and powering uphill. Basically I can hear the rear rim hit the pad and it does so with the pedal downstroke so I assume the wheel under my weight is flexing outward enough to scrap the pad. In order to avoid this brake rub I open the brake pad about 1/2 way on the adjustment lever and this usually gets rid of the problem. Of course that means I have to pull the brake levers just a bit more to get the braking I need going downhill.

The good news is my Zipp 404's with about 3,000 miles on them are still relatively true. I have noticed with the rear hub adjusted per the Zipp recommendations and with the bike in the bike stand (no load on the wheel) the wheel does have what I would consider a good bit of looseness. As I push on the rim/tire side to side I can see and feel a good bit of play. I have been told this is normal and that will the wheel loaded this play is not a problem. I do wonder if this play is partly responsible for my brake rub problem.

oldpotatoe
11-06-2010, 08:42 AM
When I have my brake pads set at the "normal" distance from the rim, I get brake rub as I am standing on the pedals and powering uphill. Basically I can hear the rear rim hit the pad and it does so with the pedal downstroke so I assume the wheel under my weight is flexing outward enough to scrap the pad. In order to avoid this brake rub I open the brake pad about 1/2 way on the adjustment lever and this usually gets rid of the problem. Of course that means I have to pull the brake levers just a bit more to get the braking I need going downhill.

The good news is my Zipp 404's with about 3,000 miles on them are still relatively true. I have noticed with the rear hub adjusted per the Zipp recommendations and with the bike in the bike stand (no load on the wheel) the wheel does have what I would consider a good bit of looseness. As I push on the rim/tire side to side I can see and feel a good bit of play. I have been told this is normal and that will the wheel loaded this play is not a problem. I do wonder if this play is partly responsible for my brake rub problem.

Since the hubs have an adjustment plate and can be adjusted while in the frame(QR tight), there should be NO 'play' or looseness of the hub. Whomever told you this was normal is incorrect.

Intertesting you say they are 'relatively true'..so they need to be trued. I guess for the other poster, they are not up to spec, since they require truing, in spite of being a wheelouttabox and their other 'benefits'.

HenryA
11-06-2010, 11:06 AM
Blah blah. Folks 'in the know'.....lol.

EVERY time someone asks for wheel recommendations, someone always chimes in with "Well, all you need is a good hub and an aluminum rim and a super experienced builder...."

OK, yes, if your goal is to simply have a reliable and repairable wheel, then yes, all you need is a set of Ultegra hubs, DT spokes, and just about any set of aluminum rims you can find. I own a set myself (DA hubs, Mavic Mach2 rims). They are a great go to wheel for my rides in bad weather, indoor trainer, etc.
For my general road riding and racing, I (and a lot of others) get much more enjoyment out of riding a nice set of carbon aero wheels. So do a lot of my friends. None of us have ever been 'stranded' because of our wheels.

There is nothing wrong with a standard set of wheels.....but don't push them on other people with false info.

A little rough there don't you think? The OP asked for opinions but I guess since you're king of the forum you can just tell everyone else to shut up?

I've seen plenty of trouble from high zoot wheels and long faces on the riders when wonder wheel lets 'em down. Don't be a wheel whiner.

Oh, and don't push YOUR false info on other people.

whforrest
11-06-2010, 01:34 PM
Good posts here................

Last year I purchased Ambrosio nemisis on campy black hubs...........riding 700-22 continental competition tubulars, (next set of tubulars going to 25) everytime I look down to my wheels, tubulars and rims I have a slight grin...............I haven't ridden tubulars since the 80's and I'm lovin it. I have a 3 part system for training with tubulars 1) vittoria pit stop is in my jersey 2) I also put some liquid in the tubular 3) I have a tubular spare under my saddle with a leather toe strap.

I couldn't be happier. i enjoy spending time in the garage working on my bike, it's like cooking a good meal for the family.

I am also looking at the zipp 303 tubulars with larger spoke count in the front wheel. Like them or not their performance at roubaix the last 2 years have been amazing!

remember a few years ago carbon rims were not compatible with the cobbles.

so many riders invest in amazing wheels and don't ride them enough.......

now;l that i am training, watching my weight and putting skin in the game I may get a bigger return on investment by purchasing some sweet wheels during competition.

i appreciate the local wheel builder and a company like zipp,

keep riding those 404 tubulars, im sure it looks sweet and it makes you a bit faster............

happy riding!

Bill

oldguy00
11-06-2010, 05:16 PM
A little rough there don't you think? The OP asked for opinions but I guess since you're king of the forum you can just tell everyone else to shut up?

I've seen plenty of trouble from high zoot wheels and long faces on the riders when wonder wheel lets 'em down. Don't be a wheel whiner.

Oh, and don't push YOUR false info on other people.

My bad.
Carbon wheels are a complete waste, and are used by customers who know nothing about what makes a real bicycle wheel and are fooled by marketing.
Anyone who weighs more than 150, and thinks that it is safe to venture more the 5km from home with carbon wheels, is not in the know.
For the record, I am not king of the forum, and HenryA is much more in the know than me.......

Henry....You're taking my comments a little too serious.
Like I said, the type of wheel you are recommending, yes, we all know they work great (really). But to say:
"those of us in the know".....well, I guess you don't think much of the people using carbon (if I were to take you too seriously...............................)
I am far from the 'expert' on all thinks 'biking'. I only speak from what I have experienced and witnessed. In 20 years of riding I've never seen someone stranded due to a failed wheel carbon wheel. Not many of them fail 'a la spinergy rev-x'.
Time for a drink. :beer:

endosch2
11-06-2010, 06:46 PM
OldPotato as you said "I think for that $1000(since you mentioned Mavic), you could get a better hub, no aluminum spokes, no propriatary parts that mavic won't support in the future(26h Helium front). "




Is anyone who rides a lot really concerned that Mavic does not make servicable parts for a 12 year old hub? I dont care myself, after 12 years I am OK with buying a new hub or wheel for that matter. I said in my post, 5 years of NO service on factory made wheels, I have gotten my moneys worth out of my mavic wheels so if in another few years they stop making spokes for my 2007 Ksyrium SLs with aluminum spokes, I wont be crying at all since I will have used them for about 15000 miles, and I think I got a fair deal. I have two bikes, that is it, I ride them, and when I wear something out because I used the snot out of it I am happy to replace it with something new. I dont have a fleet of 12 brand new lugged framed retro grouch bikes where I am trying to maintain a garage museum of past bike technology.

We are all different, that is my philosophy, I totally respect the garage bike museum thing but it does not really do it for me.

HenryA
11-06-2010, 09:10 PM
For oldguy00--

:beer:

oldpotatoe
11-07-2010, 07:36 AM
OldPotato as you said "I think for that $1000(since you mentioned Mavic), you could get a better hub, no aluminum spokes, no propriatary parts that mavic won't support in the future(26h Helium front). "




Is anyone who rides a lot really concerned that Mavic does not make servicable parts for a 12 year old hub? I dont care myself, after 12 years I am OK with buying a new hub or wheel for that matter. I said in my post, 5 years of NO service on factory made wheels, I have gotten my moneys worth out of my mavic wheels so if in another few years they stop making spokes for my 2007 Ksyrium SLs with aluminum spokes, I wont be crying at all since I will have used them for about 15000 miles, and I think I got a fair deal. I have two bikes, that is it, I ride them, and when I wear something out because I used the snot out of it I am happy to replace it with something new. I dont have a fleet of 12 brand new lugged framed retro grouch bikes where I am trying to maintain a garage museum of past bike technology.

We are all different, that is my philosophy, I totally respect the garage bike museum thing but it does not really do it for me.

Ok fair enough but back to mavic wheels, instead of their $1000 wheel...

DA/Record/DT hub, rim, stainless steel spokes. Better hubs, same performance, take the $300 or you saved and buy something else.

oldguy00
11-07-2010, 08:00 AM
Ok fair enough but back to mavic wheels, instead of their $1000 wheel...

DA/Record/DT hub, rim, stainless steel spokes. Better hubs, same performance, take the $300 or you saved and buy something else.

When it comes to performance, speed, etc., I agree, handbuilts will essentially be just as good. But it is fun to ride nice carbon wheels.

But in Henry and oldpotatoes defence, handbuilts can be pretty sexy too:

http://luxewheelworks.blogspot.com/2010/11/custom-wheelset-for-jm-mavic-reflex.html

And to the OP, you might want to watch bonktown too.....some great deals on Dura Ace pre-builts, Cosmic Carbone SLRs (this would be my choice for you), and various Reynolds wheels. Any would likely hold up just fine for you.

HenryA
11-07-2010, 10:12 AM
snipped...........

But in Henry and oldpotatoes defence, handbuilts can be pretty sexy too:

http://luxewheelworks.blogspot.com/2010/11/custom-wheelset-for-jm-mavic-reflex.html

snipped


Almost -exactly- what I ride.