PDA

View Full Version : Riding in cold affecting ability to talk normally?


RPS
03-20-2009, 09:31 PM
Does anyone experience a change in normal speech when riding in cold weather? If so, when does it happen? And for that matter, what causes it?

Have you tried talking to find your mouth feeling numb or tight and having the words come out as if you had just left the dentist after receiving anesthesia? If this happens to you, how do you prevent it?

Louis
03-20-2009, 09:38 PM
Yup. If I've been out on a long, cold ride I slur my speech as if I'm drunk. (At least I feel like that's what I'm doing, don't know what it really sounds like.)

bironi
03-20-2009, 09:48 PM
+ another here. I just spoke to my buddies about this over the weekend.

WadePatton
03-20-2009, 09:50 PM
From long days in the woods-sure. Hours and hours without speaking and chilled facial muscles. simple.

I don't ride sub-freezing that much, but would expect the same effect.

rwsaunders
03-20-2009, 10:05 PM
Believe it or not, it's an early symptom of hypothermia.

05Fierte TI
03-20-2009, 10:35 PM
rwsaunders is right, it is the early phase of hypothermia. In kayaking we use the speech test all the time to test out how others are doing. You usually do not know the effects yourself yet but others can tell. Next you start to loose the fine motor coordination like undoing a zipper or opening your car door with the key. At that point, it is starting to become more serious and is very easy to get there.

Blue Jays
03-20-2009, 10:57 PM
Agreed that it's a condition that has definitely been observed during chilly winter rides.
If we notice fellow riders in our crew starting with slurred speech, we know it's about time for a quick coffee/tea stop.

Dekonick
03-20-2009, 11:17 PM
It is easy to slip into hypothermia and not even realize it. Been there, done that.

Wear layers - use a baclava too.

:beer:

regularguy412
03-21-2009, 12:09 AM
Been there too. Second 'real' race of my young career back in 1990. Got sleeted on. Couldn't feel my legs. Came in dead last and drooling on a 40 mile road race in early March. Ate like a horse at the after-meal.

Mike in AR :beer:

David Kirk
03-21-2009, 12:11 AM
Take it from a Montanan - happens all the time.

Dave

RPS
03-21-2009, 07:17 PM
Thanks guys, I appreciate the information. Being from the south itís something I donít encounter on a regular basis; but it sounds like itís nothing to worry about. Based on feedback I should just dress warmer.

Iíve been riding in the Texas Hill Country all week and on last Saturdayís ride the temperature didnít go into the high 50s as predicted (stayed in the 40s instead), so half way through the long ride I found myself a little cooler than I prefer.

My only concern was that it wasnít happening to other riders. Maybe the combination of not being dressed warm enough and not being acclimated to cold weather made it affect me more so.

Thanks again,
Rick

CNY rider
03-21-2009, 07:25 PM
Thanks guys, I appreciate the information. Being from the south itís something I donít encounter on a regular basis; but it sounds like itís nothing to worry about. Based on feedback I should just dress warmer.

Iíve been riding in the Texas Hill Country all week and on last Saturdayís ride the temperature didnít go into the high 50s as predicted (stayed in the 40s instead), so half way through the long ride I found myself a little cooler than I prefer.

My only concern was that it wasnít happening to other riders. Maybe the combination of not being dressed warm enough and not being acclimated to cold weather made it affect me more so.

Thanks again,
Rick

Wait, don't jump to the "nothing to worry about" conclusion.
I think this happens in 2 scenarios and one of them is worrisome:
The first is when your mouth and face get very cold and affect your facial muscles and mouth/tongue. That I wouldn't worry about so much.
What I would worry about is when your whole body gets chilled, and you start slurring because core temp is dropping and as others have mentioned, you are hypothermic. The temps you are describing are classic for development of hypothermia.
Hypothermia is dangerous for a few reasons, and in a sport like cycling where you have to be thinking clearly to ride safely in a group, particularly dangerous. Do not minimize the risks of hypothermia.

RPS
03-21-2009, 07:44 PM
The first is when your mouth and face get very cold and affect your facial muscles and mouth/tongue. That I wouldn't worry about so much.This sounds a lot like what I felt. I was cool but not excessively chilled -- I had already removed a jacket I could have put back on. I was working hard enough to keep my body relatively warm.

nobrakes
03-21-2009, 08:55 PM
Everything affects my ability to speak clearly.

palincss
03-21-2009, 09:54 PM
Thanks guys, I appreciate the information. Being from the south itís something I donít encounter on a regular basis; but it sounds like itís nothing to worry about.


Hypothermia is definitely something you should worry about. Hypothermia can kill you fairly quickly.

05Fierte TI
03-21-2009, 10:06 PM
I think the big thing is that you do not see hypothermia coming on yourself, you think you are ok but often are not. One time I was kayaking by myself, dressed for the water and spent some time rolling the boat but everything seemed ok until I tried to open the door of my truck, I could not turn the key! Something so simple yet I did not have the functioning left to do the simple task. When you get that far, it starts to affect thinking and reaction time. The big thing is, I thought I was fine and warm enough the whole time. This snuck up on me and I am supposed to know the symptoms.

Ray
03-22-2009, 07:52 PM
I'm not sure how a lay person distinguishes between systemic (hypothermia) and local (your FACE is cold), but I know I've experienced the latter all the time. Used to happen almost anytime I rode in sub-freezing temps and I never SEEMED to develop any portion of hypothermia. It still happens to me all the time when I chew on ice, which is a bad habit that I've had forever and can't seem to break. After I finish a cold drink and go to work on the ice, it takes a few minutes after I finish the ice to be able to speak clearly again. In fact, if I was saying this instead of typing it, you'd hear it right now.

-Ray

Dekonick
03-22-2009, 08:05 PM
I'm not sure how a lay person distinguishes between systemic (hypothermia) and local (your FACE is cold), but I know I've experienced the latter all the time. Used to happen almost anytime I rode in sub-freezing temps and I never SEEMED to develop any portion of hypothermia. It still happens to me all the time when I chew on ice, which is a bad habit that I've had forever and can't seem to break. After I finish a cold drink and go to work on the ice, it takes a few minutes after I finish the ice to be able to speak clearly again. In fact, if I was saying this instead of typing it, you'd hear it right now.

-Ray

pica?

Ray
03-22-2009, 08:25 PM
pica?
Eh?

-Ray

CNY rider
03-22-2009, 08:48 PM
I'm not sure how a lay person distinguishes between systemic (hypothermia) and local (your FACE is cold),

-Ray

You use the rectal thermometer in your saddlebag.
What do you think you're supposed to carry around in there???????

palincss
03-22-2009, 09:41 PM
You get full marks for that one, my friend.

Ray
03-23-2009, 06:07 AM
You use the rectal thermometer in your saddlebag.
What do you think you're supposed to carry around in there???????
I think by the time I'd disrobed adequately to USE the device of which you speak, I'd definitely have hypothermia, whether I'd had it before or not. So rectal thermometers become self-fulfilling in a sense.

That, of course, is why I don't use them!

-Ray