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View Full Version : white tires,seriously?.....


sw3759
03-13-2009, 06:17 AM
seriously,why would anyone actually put tires with white tread on a bike that is going to ridden?are these only really for a display bike or what?



http://www.roadbikeaction.com/fly.aspx?layout=content&taxid=122&cid=1285

Elefantino
03-13-2009, 06:27 AM
I would. To match my white bar tape and white saddle.

And, with a little Dawn/ammonia mix, they can all be as white as new.

Climb01742
03-13-2009, 06:33 AM
I would. To match my white bar tape and white saddle.

and i have. yes, it's kinda geeky but on the right bike -- a bike that's your "baby" and only sees sunny days -- it's kinda trick too. it's totally a fashion victim move but on a bike with lots of other white bits, well, as tim gunn might say, it works. :beer:

jemoryl
03-13-2009, 10:40 AM
Those Conti 4000 tires with the white tread and black sidewalls are particularly ugly. If you are going to do white tires (I'm not a fan), wouldn't it look better if the whole thing was white?

tuscanyswe
03-13-2009, 10:50 AM
I had white challenge grifos on my cx for awhile. they actually looked pretty good even after a couple of weeks in bad weather. Obviously not bright white anymore but kinda kewl still. But 200 bux worth of flat for running white tires wasent worth it, really it wasent.. :crap:

David Kirk
03-13-2009, 10:53 AM
From a rubber-science point of view nothing beats black tires. The black in most rubber tires is not a die but it's "carbon black" which is a long chain molecule that allows the rubber to be more resilient which in turn allows for better wear and more grip. There is a very good reason that car tires are black.

Years ago lots of companies came out with colored BMX tires and they of course sold very well in that color sensitive market. But they were a let down in the performance department and now you see few serious performance BMX tires. They are simply slower (higher rolling resistance) and less grippy. A BMX bike operates at the limit of adhesion much of the time.

A road bike operates far from the limits of adhesion 99.9% of the time so I doubt that the traction of a non-black tire is an issue. And because the rubber is very thin in the first place the lack or resilience should be less of an issue that with say a BMX or MTB tire. But all that said they will have less grip and they will roll more slowly. Not a lot different for sure and maybe so little as to be unnoticeable but they will far short of a black tires performance.

I study tires maybe more than I should.

Dave

tuscanyswe
03-13-2009, 10:59 AM
Interesting info Dave, makes sence too.

Since you seem to studdy alot of things, alot of others dont have too. Appreciated!

Elefantino
03-13-2009, 11:15 AM
From a rubber-science point of view nothing beats black tires. The black in most rubber tires is not a die but it's "carbon black" which is a long chain molecule that allows the rubber to be more resilient which in turn allows for better wear and more grip. There is a very good reason that car tires are black.

Years ago lots of companies came out with colored BMX tires and they of course sold very well in that color sensitive market. But they were a let down in the performance department and now you see few serious performance BMX tires. They are simply slower (higher rolling resistance) and less grippy. A BMX bike operates at the limit of adhesion much of the time.

A road bike operates far from the limits of adhesion 99.9% of the time so I doubt that the traction of a non-black tire is an issue. And because the rubber is very thin in the first place the lack or resilience should be less of an issue that with say a BMX or MTB tire. But all that said they will have less grip and they will roll more slowly. Not a lot different for sure and maybe so little as to be unnoticeable but they will far short of a black tires performance.

I study tires maybe more than I should.

Dave
Watching Paris-Nice ... Contador does NOT ride white tires.

thejen12
03-13-2009, 11:23 AM
I got passed by a guy on a bike with white tires the other day, I have to say they looked awesome on his bike!

Jenn

L84dinr
03-13-2009, 11:49 AM
From a rubber-science point of view nothing beats black tires. The black in most rubber tires is not a die but it's "carbon black" which is a long chain molecule that allows the rubber to be more resilient which in turn allows for better wear and more grip. There is a very good reason that car tires are black.

Years ago lots of companies came out with colored BMX tires and they of course sold very well in that color sensitive market. But they were a let down in the performance department and now you see few serious performance BMX tires. They are simply slower (higher rolling resistance) and less grippy. A BMX bike operates at the limit of adhesion much of the time.

A road bike operates far from the limits of adhesion 99.9% of the time so I doubt that the traction of a non-black tire is an issue. And because the rubber is very thin in the first place the lack or resilience should be less of an issue that with say a BMX or MTB tire. But all that said they will have less grip and they will roll more slowly. Not a lot different for sure and maybe so little as to be unnoticeable but they will far short of a black tires performance.

I study tires maybe more than I should.

Dave

I was surprsed when marketing companies started selling different colored tires for sportbikes, I always thought that folks who purchased them were comprimising(sp?) themselves by riding a tire that was definitely giving up "adhesion performance" i.e. "stickiness" all for the sake of looking cool/different. This in no way applies to pedal bikes due to the vast differences in speed, torque and usage.
thought drift...
A very good friend of mine is in the carbon black business, carbon black is wierd stuff. VERY fine like talcum powder, and sticks too everything!

jeffg
03-13-2009, 12:05 PM
From a rubber-science point of view nothing beats black tires. The black in most rubber tires is not a die but it's "carbon black" which is a long chain molecule that allows the rubber to be more resilient which in turn allows for better wear and more grip. There is a very good reason that car tires are black.

Years ago lots of companies came out with colored BMX tires and they of course sold very well in that color sensitive market. But they were a let down in the performance department and now you see few serious performance BMX tires. They are simply slower (higher rolling resistance) and less grippy. A BMX bike operates at the limit of adhesion much of the time.

A road bike operates far from the limits of adhesion 99.9% of the time so I doubt that the traction of a non-black tire is an issue. And because the rubber is very thin in the first place the lack or resilience should be less of an issue that with say a BMX or MTB tire. But all that said they will have less grip and they will roll more slowly. Not a lot different for sure and maybe so little as to be unnoticeable but they will far short of a black tires performance.

I study tires maybe more than I should.

Dave

Yup, as Schwalbe says:

"Note: Colored rubber compounds are good, but black ones are better. For the very best performance in grip and durability choose the black."

I like their colored tires since it gives an accent and most of the tire that does the real work (very center and edges for cornering) are black anyway.

PhatMatt
03-13-2009, 12:51 PM
I read something that suggested the manufacturing process in making black tires is much less environmentally friendly than when making white tires due to the carbon compounds employed in the black ones.

dawgie
03-13-2009, 01:46 PM
I had some tires with yellow sidewalls once and they looked terrible after about two weeks. They turned a dingy grayish yellow in no time.

Regarding grip, I have had one accident in 35+ years of cycling, and that was from my tires sliding out on a corner. I had just installed some Michelin Axial Pros with green sidewalls on that bike, and the bike slid out after riding just a couple of miles.

I now avoid using tires with colored sidewalls, and if I do use them, I corner more carefully.

MIN
03-13-2009, 01:53 PM
I have white Randonneurs on my fixed gear. It certainly wears faster than the black version but it is grippier, especially in very cold weather.

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e211/gbae007/rando.jpg

David Kirk
03-13-2009, 01:57 PM
I had some tires with yellow sidewalls once and they looked terrible after about two weeks. They turned a dingy grayish yellow in no time.

Regarding grip, I have had one accident in 35+ years of cycling, and that was from my tires sliding out on a corner. I had just installed some Michelin Axial Pros with green sidewalls on that bike, and the bike slid out after riding just a couple of miles.

I now avoid using tires with colored sidewalls, and if I do use them, I corner more carefully.

It could be that they still had the mold release agent on them. It will make a tire very slick.

dave

tuscanyswe
03-13-2009, 02:32 PM
I have white Randonneurs on my fixed gear. It certainly wears faster than the black version but it is grippier, especially in very cold weather.

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e211/gbae007/rando.jpg


Looks nice. Is that a ti frame and a woundup fork in the distance? lets c it.

MIN
03-13-2009, 02:43 PM
Looks nice. Is that a ti frame and a woundup fork in the distance? lets c it.

oh man, i'm never gonna hear the end of this from the purists. cover your eyes! btw, it's steel.

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e211/gbae007/fixedrollers_0209_1000.jpg

tuscanyswe
03-13-2009, 02:52 PM
Hehe

You would fit right in with the messenger squad. Im the outcast in my world. I would have prefered a dropbar and another front wheel :D

Very nice frame / fork. Is it clearcoated?