PDA

View Full Version : rear wheel question


majorpat
03-08-2009, 08:58 AM
So I have a Surly Cross Check and the issue is this:

The rear wheel has slipped in the dropouts several times, only when on a steep grade and really cranking. The bike's rear spacing is set up to accept road or MTB, I have 7 year old Velomax Circuit wheels on this bike. Also, I took the adjusting screws out and place the rear wheel all the way back in the dropouts. Yes, I have cranked the QR tighter than I have on any other bike.

Some suggestions have been to use a low end Shimano steel QR. Why would this QR work better or does anyone have another suggestions? Thanks for your ideas.

Pat

Peter P.
03-08-2009, 09:07 AM
I don't know about the Velomax Circuit Wheels, but standard Shimano hubs have serrated edges on the locknuts of the hub and the same on the matching faces of the quick release skewer. Also, the Shimano skewer faces will be steel. Some of the lightweight skewers use aluminum parts which aren't hard enough to bite into the dropout face.

From a casual glance at the PDF files on the Easton web site, it does look like the hubs have steel endcaps with serrated faces. I couldn't find any closeups of the skewers.

So try more common, steel skewers with serrated edges on the clamp faces first. Borrow a pair from a friend if you can.

majorpat
03-08-2009, 09:11 AM
Sounds like this may be the solution, thanks.

MarcusPless
03-08-2009, 11:00 AM
I haven't heard of people switching to lower end skewers to solve this problem; I always thought the suggested fix was to use a decent Campy or Shimano skewer (such as a Dura Ace or previous generation Chorus/Record) that used the enclosed cam design. The enclosed cam provides more clamping force (see Sheldon's article (http://www.sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html) for more). A couple of friends had wheel slippage issues on titanium frames that disappeared as soon as they replaced the boutique skewer they were using with a Campy Record skewer.

--Marcus

Sheldon4209
03-08-2009, 11:15 AM
I had this problem on a Burley tandem with a bolt on rear axle. The problem was quickly solved by replacing the smooth washers with serrated washers.
The serrations make all the difference.
Sheldon

97CSI
03-08-2009, 06:11 PM
While I can't help with the slippage (have no experience with this problem) am wondering how the rear can be spaced for both road (130mm) and MTB (135mm)? Are the chainstays/seatstays that flexible on a Surly?

gdw
03-08-2009, 06:31 PM
Surley compomises with a 132.5mm rear. Most all frames made from steel or titainium with normal length stays (16inches+) can be spread by hand to accept wider spaced (5-6mm) rear wheels without much effort or harm to the frame. They spring back to their original spacing when the wheel is removed.

Ken Robb
03-08-2009, 08:06 PM
Rivendell used 132.5 spacing on Rambouillets and Romuli so either 130 or 135 hubs could be used. I works fine on my Ram and Rom but Curt Goodrich wasn't keen to do my new bike that way.

I have a 126mm bike that I tried to use with a 130mm wheel without success. I didn't try to cold set the spacing. I just tested to see if I could spread the stays enough by hand for it to go in. I guess 1.25mm per side is easy and 2mm per side isn't. Who knew? :rolleyes:

RPS
03-08-2009, 11:13 PM
:)