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rspecker
03-06-2009, 11:15 PM
Any advice on what to clean chain with, how often to do it, and what to use for lube.

I need a better routine.

What has worked for others out there?

I'm not a big fan of toxic solvents.

Lifelover
03-06-2009, 11:40 PM
I'm not a big fan of toxic solvents.


Learn to in-brace them! I clean in Mineral Spirits and rinse/lube with Homebrew.

Homebrew applied with a sponge paint brush frequently.

MilanoTom
03-06-2009, 11:45 PM
I attended the Park Tool Tech Summit in January, and both the Campagnolo and SRAM reps said not to use solvents to clean chains. In their opinion, the grease that's used during a chain's assembly is better than any lube, and if you use solvents, it could be washed out (at which point it's impossible to replace that deep into the chain). SRAM's guy said that chain lube doesn't do much more than prevent corrosion. Campy's guy said that when they need something, they use ProLink.

Everybody will have a different opinion on this, just like the right way to glue a tubular tire.

Regards,
Tom

WadePatton
03-07-2009, 12:07 AM
Learn to in-brace them! I clean in Mineral Spirits and rinse/lube with Homebrew.

Homebrew applied with a sponge paint brush frequently.
tried and true.

OR just replace your chain every month or two, no solvents at all. Better yet, pay the shop to do it. Those folks need to eat too, and they'll be eating with greasy fingers whilst yours are all sparkly.

tests somewhere proved that a dry chain lasted just as long as a lubed one--for our application. noisy as hell I'll bet though. (maybe Sheldon had a link to that)

WadePatton
03-07-2009, 12:12 AM
I attended the Park Tool Tech Summit in January, and both the Campagnolo and SRAM reps ....

Everybody will have a different opinion on this, just like the right way to glue a tubular tire.

Regards,
Tom
yeah Tom, I read somewhere that folks were washing the factory goo off their chains BEFORE installing them! I may not be that smart, but I's dang sure too lazy to engage in that sort of nonsense.

I'll run a new chain until I can hear it and then clean/lube my way--at that point it's _my_ chain. Hell I quit using Shimatto chains back when the started using special pins. What 22 years ago...

So don't go applying my logic to their stuff. :D

rwsaunders
03-07-2009, 12:17 AM
Try ProLink's website. The also have some links to articles about chain lube and maintenance.

http://www.progoldmfr.com/products/prolink.html

WadePatton
03-07-2009, 12:22 AM
And there's Georgena Terry on the youtube! (for a less biased opinion)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5uvLCynJxE

Louis
03-07-2009, 12:36 AM
Campy's guy said that when they need something, they use ProLink.

Same here. ProLink when the chain begins to be a bit noisy (about every eight to ten rides for me), and every now and then a cleaning with my Park chain cleaning machine. (Not as often as I should, maybe three or four times a year.)

Monitor stretch and replace the chain whenever several measurements say that it's reached 1%. Poor shifting performance can sometimes be a sign that it's time for a new chain.

Between the Park and Sheldon Brown sites you'll get nearly all the info you need.

Louis

znfdl
03-07-2009, 07:09 AM
Been using Rock 'n Roll products for 14 years. I currently use their Gold formula, it is the only chain lube that I found can last a double century.

dekindy
03-07-2009, 07:35 AM
I actually read the Dumonde Tech instructions and applied them. Only use soap and water to wash your chain to remove the dirt and crud but not the lubricant. The lubricant will "ride in" and form a protective low friction plating resulting in longer chain wear. I conservatively estimate that my chains are lasting twice as long since I started following the directions. They are constructing a new website and the instructions are not there so I cannot reference them. If you do a search I believe that you will find extensive discussion on chain lubricants and lubricating regimens.

http://www.dumondetech.com/ProductBicycle.html

I just found this on youtube. Just substitute soap and water in the Cyclone Scrubber.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eakJwvRuNqM&NR=1


I put soap and water in my Park Cyclone Chain Scrubber.
http://www.parktool.com/products/detail.asp?cat=8&item=CM%2D5

Auk
03-07-2009, 08:27 AM
To clean it, I love the ElDuke degreaser. Awesome stuff and very versitile. Lube is either TriFlow or the homebrew stuff, whichever is more handy at the time.

soulspinner
03-07-2009, 09:46 AM
Yet another satisfied Prolink Campy user :rolleyes:

rwsaunders
03-07-2009, 10:32 AM
I like this photo of the flaming chain lube that is posted at VSalon.....

RADaines
03-07-2009, 10:46 AM
And there's Georgena Terry on the youtube! (for a less biased opinion)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5uvLCynJxE

Re. White Lightning: Where do the wax bits go? I have never used this stuff but worry that you will get a build up of the wax/dirt particles. Anyone have experience with this product? Is it as good as described?

regularguy412
03-07-2009, 11:24 AM
Re. White Lightning: Where do the wax bits go? I have never used this stuff but worry that you will get a build up of the wax/dirt particles. Anyone have experience with this product? Is it as good as described?

I tried one bottle, many years ago. I think there's a small amount still in there. It didn't really work well, imho. I went back to what I was using at the time, TriFlow.

I've since switched to Prolong SPL 100 lube. Chains just don't seem to stretch at all, since I've started using this stuff. The only way I can really tell that a chain is worn is due to the side play and roller wear.

Yes. I clean with one of those nasty mineral solvents: brake cleaner. It does a nice job and evaporates completely, so when you put the lube on, there's none left to dilute the new lube. Just don't get any of the brake cleaner in your eye. It's really no fun.

Mike in AR:beer:

giordana93
03-07-2009, 11:52 AM
Re. White Lightning: Where do the wax bits go? I have never used this stuff but worry that you will get a build up of the wax/dirt particles. Anyone have experience with this product? Is it as good as described?


white lightning and the other wax lubes are for dry riding only, and even then you have to reapply pretty often. chain does stay clean, though; just not as long lasting as other lubes, and useless if you get caught in wet conditions. there's not much of a wax build up if you apply it correctly and wipe down.

pro gold is pretty good stuff. zinn swears by it.

Louis
03-07-2009, 12:18 PM
I used WL for a few years but tired of all the buildup.

Satellite
03-07-2009, 12:26 PM
I tried some of the home brew formulas others had posted. Worked good until I rode in the rain and splattered lube all over the backside of my right leg.

I did a lot of research on the subject and came to the conclusion I wanted to try Boeshield. I have been very pleased. Every bike shop I walk in to I ask them what they use in the shop and everyone that carries Boeshield said that was their choice. Boeshield works like white lightning (my previous lube) but NOT as goopy. I read somewhere that Boeing developed Boeshield to lube hard to reach actuators and mechanic systems in Airplanes that may NOT see routine PM's. Try some I think you will be pleasantly surprised.

Ahneida Ride
03-07-2009, 03:16 PM
I did a lot of research on the subject and came to the conclusion I wanted to try Boeshield. I have been very pleased. Every bike shop I walk in to I ask them what they use in the shop and everyone that carries Boeshield said that was their choice.

I used Boeshield till I found ATB. All The Best ...

My drive-train is significantly quieter running on ATB.

Even my LBS guru prefers ATB over Boeshield.

cleavel
03-07-2009, 04:34 PM
Been using Rock 'n Roll products for 14 years. I currently use their Gold formula, it is the only chain lube that I found can last a double century.
Hi,

+1

R3KC
03-07-2009, 04:56 PM
I haven't had much luck with the Rock n Roll Gold lube. Seems to last about 1 ride then the chain is noisy again. My favorite is the Dumonde Tech followed by Prolink pro gold.

Steve in SLO
03-07-2009, 05:14 PM
Pro Link user here, too. Like it but am willing to try something new, just because it would be..uh...new. I am familiar with Boeshield products, but what/who is ATB?

Ahneida Ride
03-07-2009, 06:07 PM
Pro Link user here, too. Like it but am willing to try something new, just because it would be..uh...new. I am familiar with Boeshield products, but what/who is ATB?

ATB is made by a retired chemist in his garage ...

(480) 986-9208
ATB Bike Lube
Ask for Mr. Keith Lewis

fourflys
03-07-2009, 07:46 PM
And there's Georgena Terry on the youtube! (for a less biased opinion)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5uvLCynJxE

I started using this method and love the white lightening stuff! Of course, I live in dry SoCal so YMMV...

3cb
03-07-2009, 08:00 PM
I haven't found the magical lube yet, but on the cleaning front I really like the finish line chain cleaner. It runs the chain through much smoother than than Park cleaner. As far as solvents go, I really like Mela Magic, which is a Melaleuca product. That fact that Melaleuca is a multi-level marketing company may turn some off, but it really is the best cleaning solvent I've found. It's organic, or bio-friendly--but not at the expense of being very effective.

Both the finish line and the mela magic are good for cheapskates too. The finish line reservoir is much smaller than the Park's and the mela magic is suppose to be diluted. I think I add 4 parts water.

Steve in SLO
03-07-2009, 08:08 PM
ATB is made by a retired chemist in his garage ...

(480) 986-9208
ATB Bike Lube
Ask for Mr. Keith Lewis



Thanks, A-R!

Ray
03-07-2009, 09:09 PM
Pro-Link, both to clean and to lube. I squeeze a drop on each link of a dirty chain, run it through the gears, and then wipe it down with a towel as I run the chain through the towel. Gets all sorts of gunk off of the chain, and if you sort of bend the chain in and out and up and down as you run it through the towel, you can get into a bunch of nicks and crannies. This cleans it pretty well. Then I apply another drop to each link, run it through the gears, wipe off the derailure pullies, and let it sit a couple of hours. Then wipe it down again and the chain is clean and lubed and good for another few hundred miles.

-Ray

fierte_poser
03-07-2009, 10:10 PM
FYI, Vecchio's in Boulder charges extra to clean/lube your drivetrain if it has white lightning applied. Just say no.

rockdude
03-07-2009, 11:38 PM
ATB most of the time, but I think cheap ol Tri-flow is not bad...

xjoex
03-08-2009, 08:14 AM
I have been using White Lightning for 14 years. It works fine for me.

I clean the chain by putting pedros orange peelz in rag, running the chain through the rag.

http://www.instructables.com/files/deriv/FL8/AFPS/FGUP8YLC/FL8AFPSFGUP8YLC.MEDIUM.jpg

Next I apply white lightning to the chain.
http://www.instructables.com/files/deriv/FGL/4O4I/FGUP8YLH/FGL4O4IFGUP8YLH.MEDIUM.jpg

I wipe off the excess and happily ride in incredibly muddy and rainy Pittsbrugh.

Your mileage may vary, I ride and race with white lightning.

-Joe

toaster
03-08-2009, 09:26 AM
Back in the day, we used to heat SAE 90 oil in a pan on a stove until the viscosity would change and then put our motorcycle chains in the hot oil and let it completely cool. This, theoretically would mean the oil would penetrate into all the rollers and side plates and then thicken. We'd pull the chain out and wipe clean.

I've wanted to try this with bicycle chains since I'm a proponent of leaving the thicker factory lube that bicycle chains come new with on the chain as long as possible and I think most aftermarket chain lubes are basically a thin machine oil. The problem is that the chain has to become contaminated at some point and I believe a solvent is required to get the chain free of old lube and grit.

I use diesel as my solvent of choice since it contains oil and cannot possibly remove all traces of some kind of lubrication like mineral spirits do. I have used Break-Free as a chain lube because of how this amazing stuff works as a cleaner, this is a civilian version of mil-spec CLP which is a solvent plus TFE, but ordinarily I like Road Rage by Pedros.

If there was a way to get something thick back inside the rollers after a solvent cleaning that to me would be ideal. Short of that, a light oil applied to a clean and dry chain and wiped as dry as possible seems the appropriate way to do it.

sr51
03-08-2009, 10:44 AM
If there was a way to get something thick back inside the rollers after a solvent cleaning that to me would be ideal.

Maybe this will meet your needs? :)

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chainclean.html

Velosmith
03-08-2009, 11:32 AM
Damn I miss Sheldon!!! :beer:

yarg
03-08-2009, 11:50 AM
Maybe this will meet your needs? :)

http://www.sheldonbrown.com/chainclean.html


Who in their right mind would do this? I want to know who you are.

martinrjensen
03-08-2009, 12:37 PM
Back in the day, we used to heat SAE 90 oil in a pan on a stove until the viscosity would change and then put our motorcycle chains in the hot oil and let it completely cool. This, theoretically would mean the oil would penetrate into all the rollers and side plates and then thicken. We'd pull the chain out and wipe clean.

I've wanted to try this with bicycle chains since I'm a proponent of leaving the thicker factory lube that bicycle chains come new with on the chain as long as possible and I think most aftermarket chain lubes are basically a thin machine oil. The problem is that the chain has to become contaminated at some point and I believe a solvent is required to get the chain free of old lube and grit.

I use diesel as my solvent of choice since it contains oil and cannot possibly remove all traces of some kind of lubrication like mineral spirits do. I have used Break-Free as a chain lube because of how this amazing stuff works as a cleaner, this is a civilian version of mil-spec CLP which is a solvent plus TFE, but ordinarily I like Road Rage by Pedros.

If there was a way to get something thick back inside the rollers after a solvent cleaning that to me would be ideal. Short of that, a light oil applied to a clean and dry chain and wiped as dry as possible seems the appropriate way to do it.

This is pretty much exactly what I stil do. I may actually use solvent to let the chain soak in for a day but since the chain is going into hot (200 degrees plus) 90 wt gear oil for a day (I will swirl the chain occasionally right after I put it in this oil) I don't have a problem using solvent as it's going directly into an oil bath.
After this, I let it hang on a nail for a day or at least until it quits dripping (about 6 hours), then wipe the surface off dry.

yodelinpol
03-09-2009, 08:58 AM
Who in their right mind would do this? I want to know who you are.

I do this once a week. If I ride lots of miles, sometimes twice. The money you save on new chains can be applied to the white suit, solvent etc... chain cleaning is the new fixed gear. Sweeeet!

Dekonick
03-09-2009, 08:59 AM
Captain,

We miss you.

Dave
03-09-2009, 04:29 PM
I didn't read everyone's comments but I read enough to read the common misconceptions, like the idea that solvents are bad and could wash off some valuable lube. That is nonsense. Any lube will get contamintated with grit fairly quickly and the best thing you can do is to either clean the chain to remove this lube that has become a grinding paste, or at least dilute it with a generous application of home brew.

I've cleaned new chains with mineral spirits to remove all the factory grease and I've also just wiped the exterior to remove the factory goo from the outside. Makes no difference, since I then apply my regular homebrew, before using the chain. The cleaned chains won't ooze grease all over new cogs and clean chainrings.

The biggest problem for most users is they don't know how to measure chain wear and they don't know that not all chains wear in the same manner. Regardless of the brand, using a Park chain checker is the worst way to measure chain wear. It always exaggerates the wear by combining elongation and roller wear. It may have you tossing chains that a scale would show to only be half worn. A scale is the proper tool to use for measuring elongation.

Campy chains are the only ones I have found that elongate so little that a precision scale will show very little elongation, even after 6,000 miles. Using calipers to check the distance between rollers will reveal lots of roller wear and feeler gages will show the increase in side clearance. I trash a Campy chain when the roller spacing increases by .035-.040 inch and I try to always use several chains in a rotation on a new cassette. If a single chain is used until the rollers show the chain to be worn out, you will most likely get chain skip when a second new chain is installed. I expect to get three times than amount of use from a cassette (and three chains) and never encounter chain skip. I could get this kind of mileage by using six chains and tossing them when half worn. The extra three chains cost about as much as a cassette.

One last comment about 80/90W gear lube. Heating it is a waste of time. Chain clearances are quite large, so it will readily run into all areas need lubrication without being thinned with heat.

I've used nothing but inexpensive home brew for years and get a lot more mileage than the average I see posted. This year, I'm finally starting the WD-40 test. I have two bikes with 11 speed chains. One will get the finest hombrew with 80/90W synthetic gear lube and the other will get regular doses of lowly WD-40. I've alread logged about 200 miles on the WD-40 and it's working just like a typical homebrew lube as far the need for relubing and general cleanliness. I wipe my chains after the first ride (about 50 miles) and relube quickly after the second. I'm not so lazy that I try to get 2-300 from one lubing. I intend to never perform an off the bike cleaning of either chain, since there are no master links designed for 11 speed chains. FWIW, the WD-40 test chain also has a connex 10S1 link in it.

Flat Out
03-09-2009, 05:43 PM
I once read in Zinn's that if you wipe the chain down after every ride you'll never have to give it "the full monty". So that's what I do. Followed by a drop of Prolink on each link. Seems to work pretty well.

Ozz
03-09-2009, 06:00 PM
ATB is made by a retired chemist in his garage ...

(480) 986-9208
ATB Bike Lube
Ask for Mr. Keith Lewis
Good stuff....AR turned me on to this a couple years ago.

I used to use Dumonde Tech, but the cleaning process in their instructions seemed a little much....

With ATB, I just use simple green in a park chain cleaner, spin for a couple minutes, rinse with water, wipe dry and add lube. Takes about 10 minutes.

97CSI
03-09-2009, 06:35 PM
I once read in Zinn's that if you wipe the chain down after every ride you'll never have to give it "the full monty". So that's what I do. Followed by a drop of Prolink on each link. Seems to work pretty well.+1, and the Campy rep agrees. Good enough for me. Have a stainless Wipperman with ~4K miles that gives good evidence that this treatment works well.

fierte_poser
03-10-2009, 04:09 PM
I've used nothing but inexpensive home brew for years and get a lot more mileage than the average I see posted. This year, I'm finally starting the WD-40 test. I have two bikes with 11 speed chains. One will get the finest hombrew with 80/90W synthetic gear lube and the other will get regular doses of lowly WD-40. I've alread logged about 200 miles on the WD-40 and it's working just like a typical homebrew lube as far the need for relubing and general cleanliness. I wipe my chains after the first ride (about 50 miles) and relube quickly after the second. I'm not so lazy that I try to get 2-300 from one lubing. I intend to never performa an off the bike cleaning of either chain, since their are no master links designed for 11 speed chains. FWIW, the WD-40 test chain also has a connex 10S1 link in it.

WD-40 is an interesting thought. Not much actual 'oil' in there, from what I know. Mainly the oil is there to leave a light film that prevents corrosion. I wouldn't expect much actual lubrication performance from it.

OTOH, most lubes these days don't contain much actual 'oil'. Progold and your typical homebrew is 3:1 or maybe 5:1?

BTW, has anyone ever cleaned a chain with automotive aerosol brake cleaner?

Kevan
03-10-2009, 05:57 PM
Chain on big ringy-dingy and lil'st gear off the back. Bike in stand, start a pedaling, dripping T9 onto chain over the cogset. Regardless of political affiliation, be liberal with the application. spin the cranks to and fro...spin...spin...spin... Woik it in good. Keep spinning and applying. Drips are good. Just not on your rug.

Take rag and at the lower level of the chain loop, just ahead of the RD grip the chain with the rag, applying gripping power sufficiently to remove grime and loose enough so the chain can move freely through the rag. Change the rag so clean cloth is used to continue cleaning (Continue doing this. Clean is good.). Pinch the face plates and continue to spin. Grab the chain and flex it downward sorta as if it were another drop like the RD does to the chain. Continue pedaling and this bend in the chain will help clean dem lil' roller thingies good. Stop and now pinch the big chainring and slowly spin the crank and remove the dirty oil slop from the teeth and plate. Repeat the whole process like you do your shampoo, if you do that repeat thing. I usually don't. Done? Then...

Apply T9 again as before, liberally again. Pedal...pedal...pedal... to and fro. With a clean rag wipe off the excess while spinning. Clean the chainring again and TUH-DUH!!!!! You're done. Let dry before introducing new dirt.

Next question?

rnhood
03-10-2009, 06:25 PM
I use Duralube, engine treatment available in just about any auto parts store, cut at about 3:1 with mineral spirits. This makes a great chain lube - much like the homebrew already mentioned.

I believe the aerosol brake cleaner is merely canned acetone. It'll clean the chain but, you need to relube very well. I like cleaning with WD-40 or one of the other similar products better. That thin established boundry layer is not totally removed this way. Only the dirt and foreign matter gets removed.

dekindy
03-11-2009, 08:39 AM
Good stuff....AR turned me on to this a couple years ago.

I used to use Dumonde Tech, but the cleaning process in their instructions seemed a little much....

With ATB, I just use simple green in a park chain cleaner, spin for a couple minutes, rinse with water, wipe dry and add lube. Takes about 10 minutes.

Where do you get ATB? Website?

Ozz
03-11-2009, 08:47 AM
Where do you get ATB? Website?
Ahneida posted his phone number a couple posts back:

(480) 986-9208
ATB Bike Lube
Ask for Mr. Keith Lewis

He had an email address, as well....it is not on the bottle I have so I will need to look for it. Ahneida might have it, or you could do a search.

IIRC, "Too Tall" was doing a "lube test" a couple years ago and there was a pretty long discussion similar to this one. You might see if you can find that.

:beer:

ejh
03-11-2009, 09:36 AM
being in the auto biz I take my chain off about 1 a month and soak it in brake clean in an old antifreeze bottle, blow it out with air, then spray it with brake clean again, blow it out with air, then Boeshield, 1 drop per link spin the cranks, let it sit for a while and ride. I can get 3K+ on a campy 10 speed chain before any wear.

tab123
03-11-2009, 12:07 PM
Another vote for ProLube for cleaning and lubing.

My issue is I do not know what to do with the rags used for drive train cleaning. I live in a condo and do not have a good storage space for filthy rags. I once tried washing the rags in the washing machine, and it was a disaster.

sspielman
03-11-2009, 12:55 PM
When it comes to chains, the term "dry lube" is an oxymoron....

SteveV0983
03-11-2009, 09:12 PM
I have used Prolink Gold and Pedros Synlube, but nothing works like a product called "Dumonde Tech" Lite (http://www.hgnr.com). This stuff is amazing, but you have to follow strict directions.

1) First thoroughly clean your chain with something like Pedro's Citrus Degreaser and try to get it completely clean and dry. This part is very important - you must get it as clean and dry as possible.
2) You apply the Dumonde Tech just before you ride. I usually do the cleaning a day or so before my next ride so it is dry before the ride. Put one drop of Dumonde Tech on each link and then wipe off as much as possible with a clean rag. This sounds strange, but you do want to get off as much as possible.
3) This product actually pushes out the other cleaners and gunk, so your chain may seem to get dirty quick at first. But that's OK.
4) Repeat the above steps after 2 or 3 rides. Clean - lube - wipe off - ride.
5) The people at the company say that you should only reapply when you start to hear your chain while riding.

After a month or so, you will start to get longer between applications. But after you have gone through a few treatments, you will not believe how quiet your chain stays.

By the way, after the initial deep cleaning, I switched to Pedros Bio Degreaser for the cleaning before the lube. It is plenty strong enough for basic cleanings and is fully biodegradable. If you can find this product (I got it at my local bike shop), you will not be disappointing. I have been riding for 20 years and this is by far the best lube I have ever used. My bike is a 1993 Serotta TG with all Ultegra 9 speed and it rides like new.

Just don't forget to wipe it off after you apply it. And don't put it on the derailleur wheels - there is no need to do so.

Good luck if you get to try it.

toaster
03-15-2009, 10:12 PM
I tried new procedure on my chain. Cleaned it in diesel then dried it and then went out and bought 85w-140w gear oil to use as lube.

The chain went into pan with the gear oil in it and heated on the stove until hot and much thinner.

After oil and chain cooled, it was hung up overnight and installed. Get a rag and get as much excess off as possible. I use Super-Link so I can open chain.

The chain felt and looked like a new chain that has the stickier heavy lube we're used to seeing.

Runs super smooth too!

Ahneida Ride
03-15-2009, 11:45 PM
ATB Bike Lube
(480) 986-9208

klewisinc@msn.com

Elefantino
03-16-2009, 05:34 AM
+1 on Dumonde Tech Lite. Puts ProLink Gold to shame.

dekindy
03-16-2009, 07:04 AM
I have used Prolink Gold and Pedros Synlube, but nothing works like a product called "Dumonde Tech" Lite (http://www.hgnr.com). This stuff is amazing, but you have to follow strict directions.

1) First thoroughly clean your chain with something like Pedro's Citrus Degreaser and try to get it completely clean and dry. This part is very important - you must get it as clean and dry as possible.
2) You apply the Dumonde Tech just before you ride. I usually do the cleaning a day or so before my next ride so it is dry before the ride. Put one drop of Dumonde Tech on each link and then wipe off as much as possible with a clean rag. This sounds strange, but you do want to get off as much as possible.
3) This product actually pushes out the other cleaners and gunk, so your chain may seem to get dirty quick at first. But that's OK.
4) Repeat the above steps after 2 or 3 rides. Clean - lube - wipe off - ride.
5) The people at the company say that you should only reapply when you start to hear your chain while riding.

After a month or so, you will start to get longer between applications. But after you have gone through a few treatments, you will not believe how quiet your chain stays.

By the way, after the initial deep cleaning, I switched to Pedros Bio Degreaser for the cleaning before the lube. It is plenty strong enough for basic cleanings and is fully biodegradable. If you can find this product (I got it at my local bike shop), you will not be disappointing. I have been riding for 20 years and this is by far the best lube I have ever used. My bike is a 1993 Serotta TG with all Ultegra 9 speed and it rides like new.

Just don't forget to wipe it off after you apply it. And don't put it on the derailleur wheels - there is no need to do so.

Good luck if you get to try it.

I can't find the instructions on the internet that I found previously. Those Dumonde Tech instructions(original, lite had not been introduced yet) stated that soap and water and a brush were the only thing that you should clean your chain with because degreaser would the protective coating that builds up with multiple applications. Since I started following those instructions my chain life has increased dramatically.

Is the degreasing for the initial application only or to be done everytime that the chain is cleaned?

Elefantino
03-16-2009, 07:15 AM
Is the degreasing for the initial application only or to be done everytime that the chain is cleaned?
First time only. After that, just Dawn and water before you reapply, which won't be all that often in dry conditions.

The stuff just plain rocks.

dekindy
03-16-2009, 07:26 AM
First time only. After that, just Dawn and water before you reapply, which won't be all that often in dry conditions.

The stuff just plain rocks.

Thanks for that clarification. The next time I will purchase the Lite to replace the bottle of Original that I have had forever.

jbl
03-16-2009, 09:11 AM
Another vote for ProLube for cleaning and lubing.

My issue is I do not know what to do with the rags used for drive train cleaning. I live in a condo and do not have a good storage space for filthy rags. I once tried washing the rags in the washing machine, and it was a disaster.

I'd like to know this too, since I live in an apartment. I've just been tossing them. Wasteful, I know.

Maybe we just need to soak them in degreaser?