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Climb01742
12-03-2007, 06:42 AM
Part 1: Preface

Think back to high school. There was this girl you liked. It took you forever to talk to her. Even longer to ask her out. And even longer still before you worked up the courage to kiss her.

That kiss had a lot riding on it. You had imagined much and built up that first kiss into something big. Would it be heaven or would it be hell?

Waiting for a new custom bike is sort of like that. There’s much expectation and hope. Then, when it finally arrives and you’re about to go on that maiden voyage, you have mixed, conflicting emotions.

Hope is tinged with trepidation. You want to be blown away but fear being disappointed. Like kisses, dreamed-of bikes have disappointed in the past. When hope becomes flesh, or in the case frames, you never know quite what to expect.

I waited almost 18 months for the Responsorium. On top of that, it was half of our “wedding bike” pair of matching-paint Pegs. Could be heaven or could be hell.

I want to insert a caveat here. I’m sure there are some who think I’ve consumed so much Dario Kool-Aid, that he could build a tricycle and I would swoon over it. So to set the record straight and to serve as a prelude to what follows:

The Luigino was one of my least favorite bike of all time. And while I have owned and loved many Pegorettis, I have never been blind to the reality of each one. The Marcelo has near-fighter-jet acceleration – maybe the best I’ve found -- but after two or three hours on less-than-perfect roads, my back ached. The Fina wastes not a single watt of your power, and rides as steel-like as any alu frame can, but it too exacts an aching price for its stiffness-equals-output formula. A Love #3 does everything right but doesn’t seem to do any one thing with oh-my-god brilliance. It’s an ideal modern race tool but oddly, for me anyway, wasn’t as inspiring as some of Dario’s other bikes. And my favorite Pegoretti, the CCKMP, is a bit delicate, a fragile angel of vertical places, as the dent in my seat tube testifies.

I love Pegorettis the way I love my wife: with all my heart but with my eyes open. To see a shortcoming or trade-off – who is perfect? -- is just honesty, not a crack in the love.

I say all this as a preface. An attempt to say that what follows is as honest and objective as I can make it.

Oh, wait. One more short preface. I love carbon bikes. Or said another way, all of my most favorite bikes have been carbon. In order: Colnago C50. Time VXRS Ulteam. Parlee Z1. I’ve always been a bit disappointed in steel bikes. Until now, my favorite steel bike was a Merckx MX Leader. It was a glorious tank that was tougher and smoother than any New England pothole but took watts-out-the-wahzoo to get up to speed. A masterpiece with a downside. Other steels I’ve owned were: a CSi, a CIII, a ‘Nago Master Light and a Peg Duende. All of these had, for me, a trade-off: greater smoothness at the cost of a bit of sluggishness. Like a defensive back who’s lost a step but moves so smoothly and plays with such guile that it’s hard to spot unless he’s covering Randy Moss.

So, I’m not a big fan of steel.

But 18 months ago in Italy, Dario convinced me that what I wanted from a frame was to be achieved with steel. Trust, faith, friendship and maybe some wine overcame skepticism. What I asked Dario for was the mythical beast. The Unicorn. That mythical bike that is the perfect blend and balance of performance and comfort.

To be continued...

Climb01742
12-03-2007, 06:43 AM
Part Two: The Goods

Well, kids, behold the Unicorn. The mythical is real. The Responsorium is the best bike I’ve ever ridden. It may be the perfect bike. Big claim, I know. But here’s where I’m coming from: Every frame, in my experience, is a series of trade-offs or balancing acts. To achieve one characteristic, another must be compromised, even slightly. Many bikes I’ve loved have done one or a few things exceptionally well, but in doing that amazing thing, they few short in other things. I had come to just take some trade-off or compromise as part of the deal. But what if there were no trade-offs?

I’m not a racer. At 5’11”, 155-160, I’m not a power rider. I love training, I love riding hard. My favorite ride/workout is a 20-minute, steady-state, big-ring sufferfest. From my days as a runner, I seek out “the flow”. In running, it is those miles were every part of your body is in synch. You’re fluid with a capital F. It’s not your fastest pace, but it is the harmony of speed and smooth. Your feet barely touch the ground. You glide more than run.

You can feel that, too, on a bike. There’s a rhythm your legs and the bike find. Power just glides from your body to the bike. There’s a little give to the frame. Imperfections in the road are absorbed by the bike; so that few, if any, jolts break your rhythm.

Until now, the C50 gave me this feeling more often than any other bike.

Let me try to break down what a Respo feels like:

Smooth is the first word that comes to mind. Wearing Cosmic Carbone Premiums and Michelin tires, I’ve never ridden a bike that makes road imperfections disappear more. Both small, chip-seal bumps are muted, and big bumps are erased even better.

Glide is the next word. Some bikes seem to require more torque to get rolling. They diesel up to speed. The Respo almost feels like there’s no chain. The pedals just turn more easily and the bike just scoots. There isn’t one ounce of sluggishness in the bike. Out of the saddle climbing is brilliant. Stiffer bikes may “rocket” forward more dramatically, but that darn word “glide” comes up again when you accelerate, either seated or standing. There isn’t any hesitation at all but yet there isn’t the stiff, jarring leap forward either. More like this immediate swoooosh. “Efficiency” is too cold, too clinical of a word to describe this feeling. It is very efficient, but does it in a way that makes me giggle. It’s just fun.

I haven’t been able to get any chain rub. The chainstays may not be Marcelo or Emma big, but they look elegantly beefy nevertheless.

The steering is steady with just a hint of quickness. It’s never nervous but it is alert, ready to react to input. Some nervous bikes seem to have a mind of their own upfront. The Respo is calm but willing, alert to where you want to go, not where it wants to go.

I haven’t weighed the bike but it rides, in some ways, like a light bike. In fact, it has all the good traits of a light bike without any of the bad traits. It accelerates and climbs beautifully. But many light bikes are jumpy, skittish and a bit “brittle” to ride. None of those words apply here.

The first time I rode it, I didn’t climb onto the bike. I slipped into it. The fit just feels dialed-in perfect. The balance is right.

Aesthetically, the paint is beautiful, classic, subtle. Pearl white with a soft green. Both of which twinkle in the sunlight. And the welds are small, almost delicate.

As much as I love this bike, I will never say “steel is real”. Because this bike feels unlike any other steel bike I’ve ever ridden. This bike is real. And it happens to be steel. My guess is, the stainless steel played some part in it, but not the main part. In some ways, this bike is the perfect storm. It’s a custom. But a custom based on the builder’s own eyes and hands doing the fit. It’s born, too, from me having ridden many of Dario’s other bikes and being able to articulate what I thought about each, this giving Dario reference points for what I was after. And finally, I know the builder. He’s my friend. I believe I can judge the bike dispassionately, but our friendship adds profoundly to my enjoyment of, and connection to, the bike.

To be continued...

Climb01742
12-03-2007, 06:44 AM
Part 3: Splitting Hairs

Ok, here’s the splitting hairs part of our show. All three bikes in this paragraph are 9s out of 10. But if one were the ask, which is closer to a 10 of 10? Versus my C50, the former benchmark, the Respo is more efficient, quicker off the marker, and more comfortable – not by a mile but not by an inch, either. The Respo is clearly superior in all categories. Versus my Ulteam, the Time is definitely lighter, and may be a shade more efficient, accelerate just a bit faster, but as far as comfort goes, the Respo is much more compliant. A bigger, stronger racer may like, and need, the Ulteam’s stiffness but while I haven’t done this comparison, here’s what I would bet a week’s pay on: I could power through a long, big-ring interval faster on the Respo than I could on the Ulteam. Hitting bad pavement on the Ulteam jolts me, enough that it often breaks my rhythm/cadence. My guess is the Respo would glide over these bumps/holes better and my power rhythm wouldn’t be broken. With most bikes there’s a trade-off between stiffness/speed and comfort/compliance. My Ulteam trades speed for jolts. I haven’t found any trade-offs or compromises yet in the Respo. It’s as close to a 10 of 10 as I’ve found. (All three bikes wear carbon clinchers: Aeolus w/Vittorias for C50 and Ulteam vs Cosmic Carbones w/Michelins for Respo. All tires inflated to 110 psi.)

All of which brings me to a question. Has the bike industry, including Serotta, given up too soon on steel? I’ve never ridden a Meivici built for me, so take that into account. But if one of Seerotta’s goals is to build the best bikes possible – especially given their heritage in steel – it makes me wonder if de-emphasizing steel was such a good idea. It makes sense economically to pursue carbon in today’s bike industry, no argument. But if extraordinary bikes are your mission…

The Respo adds to my admiration for the builders who haven’t forsaken steel. Or put better: who continue to push steel further. A belief in steel must feel lonely at times. And it must limit their sales to some extent. But based on the Respo, it doesn’t limit their ability to create something magical.

Over the last four or five years, I owned over 30 bikes. I have mixed feelings about the wisdom, and financial impact, of that. But if I look at it as an education, then I feel better. Because it has left me wise enough to know that the Responsorium is what I’ve been looking for all along.

The unicorn. It exists. Who knew?

And trust me. No one is more surprised than I am. A steel bike. Who knew? 1Centaur has wisely asked for a 6-month update. Fair enough. Time will tell.

Until then, I’ll just be giggling.

Bike build:

DA 10
Mavic Cosmic Carbone Premiums
Michelin tires
Deda Supernatural bars
FSA stem 120mm
Thomson seatpost
Regal saddle

Frame:

54.5 x 58 (for sure)
STA bit slacker than 73* (eye-balled)
HTA bit steeper than 73* (eye-balled)

The freakin' end. :D

weisan
12-03-2007, 06:47 AM
Wonderful!

Many thanks...well worth the wait.

weisan
12-03-2007, 06:59 AM
This bike is real. And it happens to be steel.
~ Unicorn Rider

William
12-03-2007, 07:07 AM
Nice write up climb. It sounds very intriguing. You know, if you like, I'll bet I can get a little chain rub out of it. ;)




William

Too Tall
12-03-2007, 07:07 AM
Well done lad :) Now you are up against it. Found the "it" bike. It inspires non?

Erik.Lazdins
12-03-2007, 07:11 AM
Wow you type fast! :)

Great writeup - thanks!

Elefantino
12-03-2007, 07:13 AM
I feel your gain.

I'm sure you're right, that if the bike was manufactured by Jones or Smith or Nerlman it wouldn't be as sweet as one built by a friend.

Wonderful report.

Next, a photo.

Sandy
12-03-2007, 07:14 AM
Great review. Appears as if you have found the "perfect" (my word) bike for you. That is especially meaningful in that it is a Pegoretti and that only adds to its meaningfulness because of your close friendship with Dario Pegoretti.

Must be very special to you to ride such a special bike built by a very special freind and builder.


Sandy

Ray
12-03-2007, 07:28 AM
Nice write-up Climb. For me, the test was whether the bike killed my bike lust (at least for bikes of the same general type). So far, my two Spectra have done that for the 'performance road bike' category and 'sport touring road bike' categories - no interest in anything else since I got each of those. And my Rambouillet seems to be all that I'll ever want in a fixed gear. I'm not sure that's a fair test for someone with the collections that you and others around here have (you may be genetically REQUIRED to continue trying new stuff), but it'll be interesting to see how the six-month or one-year follow-up goes. But that thing you describe of doing things that once seemed contradictory and mutually exclusive (quick yet stable, immediately responsive yet smooth, etc) sounds real familiar to me from finding that "IT" bike. I think the right fitter/designer/builder can figure out what's gonna work best for a particular rider. Dario seems to be among that small handful who are incredibly great at this.

Here's wishing you many years of happiness on this bike.

-Ray

Elefantino
12-03-2007, 07:31 AM
Be honest: Only death kills bike lust, Ray.

soulspinner
12-03-2007, 07:34 AM
In the recent years I have come to see ride in a bike frame as you do. I need a little give and crave a smooth ride to soothe my old injuries and back imperfections. In talking to a famous builder on the west coast, he said on the dl that everbody comes to him saying they hate frame flex. You need some for proper tracking etc. Ive also thought stainless would be ideal for a long time-it has proved to build into heavier( albeit slightly less expensive than butted ti) frames than hoped for but IF has recently gotten Reynolds to supply lighter chainstays. When I compared tubesets I see XCR chainstays are very light and the 953 front triangle is lighter than XCR(with smaller diamters that should make the ride nicer). Wonder if anyone has built one of these. Steel has that feel the road thing I like when going downhill. I cant tolerate any more serious injuries and am slightly timid downhill despite a bike that is rock solid descending.
Sounds like you have a new favorite bike and to us bike junkies that rocks our world. Thanks for the review but without pics, its 10 demerits :p . Ride on and congrads Climb.

bnewt07
12-03-2007, 07:44 AM
I've really enjoyed reading this, not least sharing your evident pleasure in writing it. It is great to read a report from somebody who has obviously owned and ridden bikes of various sorts, and is full of enthusiasm.

After 18 month wait it would be a tough nut that wrote a negative review for his new bike mind!

As for the steel thing surely we have to use the 'M' word-marketing. It is clearly possible to build bikes of widely varying character (and style) with all the commonly used materials (actually scratch that-I've never ridden a really compliant aluminium bike but you get my point). Manufacturers have to look at the market, where people make at least initial selections on style, price and perceived excellence rather than prolonged test rides. This means that high tec materials catch the buyers eye such as Carbon and Ti etc. Steel has not retained buyers cachet in the mainstream-where new is always good.

It is not easy to market old technology to the masses and actually say it is better. Ask the makers of analogue record players.

Acotts
12-03-2007, 07:45 AM
Bike porn with no visuals....c'mon. :crap:

Thats like real porn without the internet. What am I supposed to do, use my imagination!!?! That stopped working for me when I turned 15!

:bike:

Fixed
12-03-2007, 07:47 AM
bro did I miss the pic ? it's worth a 1000 words imho
cheers

Acotts
12-03-2007, 07:50 AM
Oh yeah...nice write-up. That was a fun review.

weisan
12-03-2007, 07:52 AM
Tall-pal has the lead...but not for long.

http://alicehui.com/serotta/misc/image_count.gif

Ray
12-03-2007, 08:06 AM
Be honest: Only death kills bike lust, Ray.
Well, perhaps mine is just seriously wounded and will recover to fight another day? :cool:

Seriously though, from the first few rides on my "IT" road bike, I haven't had any interest in getting another. I even canceled one I was waiting for and had a pretty big investment in. My next bike was an "IT" sport touring from the same builder and I'm not looking for one of those anymore either. I did just buy a Bleriot to replace an old and badly ill-fitting errand/commuter bike, so I'm not claiming that ALL of my bike lust is dead, just in the frame types in which its been satisfied. Maybe I'll change my tune in time, but I've got a few seasons in with these bikes and have no desire for anything else.

We're always comparing bikes with relationships. While I won't say I haven't LOOKED at other women since I met my wife, I've never been seriously tempted to do anything beyond that. And that's been almost 25 years. So I think these things are possible short of death. :beer:

Not to say this needs to apply to you or Climb or, God forbid, Douglas. Or anyone else. But it seems to work for me.

-Ray

paczki
12-03-2007, 08:21 AM
Behold? Like many unicorn stories a beautiful description, but where are the pictures to behold?

Seriously, a great write-up.

davids
12-03-2007, 08:25 AM
If a picture is worth a thousand words, you owe us two less pictures now... ;)

Thanks for the detailed, honest, heartfelt report. It was a pleasure to read. I'm thrilled that you are so happy with the frame. Congratulations again!

...oh, lookie (http://forums.thepaceline.net/showthread.php?t=36828)!

Len J
12-03-2007, 09:23 AM
Great write0-up....well thought out.

I agree with Ray........when you find "that" bike....the bike lust meter goes idle (or at least is toned down dramaticially).

Pics?

Len

obtuse
12-03-2007, 09:56 AM
that's a nice bike.

jerk

jghall
12-03-2007, 10:01 AM
That has to be one of the better write-up's I have seen.

Hat's off to you Climb for the great read, and an even better bike.

rwsaunders
12-03-2007, 10:01 AM
Great story; full of passion; the way one should be about the limited time that we have on this planet. Thanks for sharing your experience (and the bike) with us.

zap
12-03-2007, 10:06 AM
Great write up.

Keep at it and enjoy.

Birddog
12-03-2007, 10:23 AM
Great report, but does it plane? or is "glide" the new plane?

Birddog

J.Greene
12-03-2007, 10:26 AM
Sounds like a nice bike.

JG

dbrk
12-03-2007, 10:30 AM
Great report, but does it plane? or is "glide" the new plane?
Birddog

It's all a matter of following the trail. Uhh, yeah. Sure.

I no longer watch trailers anymore even as I sit this morning in an airport hoping to catch a plane.

dbrk
who wouldn't know if any of his bikes plane but hopes his trail this morning leads to a plane...or something.

Grant McLean
12-03-2007, 10:44 AM
Part 3: Splitting Hairs

Ok, here’s the splitting hairs part of our show. All three bikes in this paragraph are 9s out of 10. But if one were the ask, which is closer to a 10 of 10? Versus my C50, the former benchmark, the Respo is more efficient, quicker off the marker, and more comfortable – not by a mile but not by an inch, either. The Respo is clearly superior in all categories. Versus my Ulteam, the Time is definitely lighter, and may be a shade more efficient, accelerate just a bit faster, but as far as comfort goes, the Respo is much more compliant. A bigger, stronger racer may like, and need, the Ulteam’s stiffness but while I haven’t done this comparison, here’s what I would bet a week’s pay on: I could power through a long, big-ring interval faster on the Respo than I could on the Ulteam.

I loved your review, and have gone through a similar journey finding bikes that
ride 'just right' too.

After 25 years of riding, the "feel" of a great bike is all that matters to me.

Is there actually any difference in speed or efficiency? I don't know for sure,
but honesty I don't think so, and it doesn't matter to me. I've tested a lot of
courses on different bikes over the past many seasons, and they aren't different
when it comes to speed. Bikes i'd swear are faster in feeling, when you look
at the watch, they aren't. But maybe unicorns exsist, maybe they don't,
and maybe it doesn't matter.

For those of us who no longer race, our cycling is about the experience,
and there are great experiences to be had aboard a great bike!

-g

Moosedryvr
12-03-2007, 11:28 AM
Vy nice bike. I love that paint, Steve H has something very simalar on his Peg and pics cannot do it justice. Very subtle, very sweet.
Is the 54.5 the ST length and the 58 the TT? I expected to see a sloper at first and am still unsure which measurement is for which tube. Just curious.

Shawn G

Grant McLean
12-03-2007, 11:53 AM
Is the 54.5 the ST length and the 58 the TT? I expected to see a sloper at first and am still unsure which measurement is for which tube. Just curious.

Shawn G


Take a look a the pics in the gallery. Seat tube is measured center to center,
but there is a head tube extension of a couple of cm's, so it's more like a 56 or 57,
The bike fit looks totally dialed!


-g

slowgoing
12-03-2007, 12:19 PM
Thanks for putting the effort into the review. Congrats to both you and Dario. Sounds like a wonderful bike.

1centaur
12-03-2007, 12:56 PM
As one CF aficionado to another, I have been waiting for the details of your ride to see if I might have to reconsider my firm stance that steel cannot provide what I am looking for from a frame.

The key to my negative answer is that you had previously found steel to be "smooth" even if it lacked some of the other elements of good CF rides. I have never found steel to be smooth. Bumps and vibrations through steel consistently struck me, so to speak, differently from the same through CF, and not in a good way. I use a Ti bike in the winter, and while it's fun to get different sensations, the fact remains, for me, that metal vibrates like metal and CF does not.

Also interesting in your write-up is the love of 20-minute big-ring intervals, something I truly loathe. If I liked them, however, I could more easily imagine getting into that rumbling tank mode that I would associate with "smooth" metal frames. That mode is particularly enhanced by Carbones, which in my case I put on the AXM because, once you go heavy, you might as well go all the way. I love that package for what it is, but would not ride it every day.

For my style of riding the local rollers, where lightness and efficiency with CF damping is the package I seek, steel will remain off the table for me.

That said, I loved your write up and am pleased by your happiness at the whole package. I totally agree with your inclusion of the friend dynamic. Being an early customer of Nick Crumpton's makes me enjoy his work even more than I might if he'd been out there for 20 years before I found him. I look forward to the 6-month commentary, as well as hearing about what the ride is like with lighter, possibly handbuilt wheels, which would make the frame even more comfortable, I think, and a better climber.

Keith A
12-03-2007, 02:08 PM
Outstanding review James...you really did a fantastic job letting us enjoy the experience with you!

Ti Designs
12-03-2007, 02:26 PM
Think back to high school. There was this girl you liked. It took you forever to talk to her. Even longer to ask her out. And even longer still before you worked up the courage to kiss her.

A while back I saw the guy who lives at the other end of my street riding a pegoretti. Oddly enough, that's exactly what happened with the girl I liked in high school.

Climb01742
12-03-2007, 02:39 PM
A while back I saw the guy who lives at the other end of my street riding a pegoretti. Oddly enough, that's exactly what happened with the girl I liked in high school.

ed, sunday a week ago, i rode past the harvard women's cycling team (or at least some of them) stopped outside the colonial inn. being their coach isn't hard on the eyes.

davyt
12-03-2007, 03:14 PM
Hey James, you're famous!

2007.12.03 Responsorium Review: Behold the Unicorn (http://www.pegorettiusa.com/)

Climb01742
12-03-2007, 03:19 PM
Hey James, you're famous!

2007.12.03 Responsorium Review: Behold the Unicorn (http://www.pegorettiusa.com/)

wonder if this means i get a discount on something????

fiamme red
12-03-2007, 03:22 PM
wonder if this means i get a discount on something????Free pair of socks?

davyt
12-03-2007, 03:25 PM
James,

Thanks for the review, it's going to make my job very easy: I'll just point at you and say, "What he said!"

I'm in awe of what Dario did on your bike: the paint, the dropouts, everything is Just Right. I hope you and Mrs. Climb enjoy your rides for a very, very long time. Everlasting love, indeed!
--
Davy

Smiley
12-03-2007, 03:33 PM
"All of which brings me to a question. Has the bike industry, including Serotta, given up too soon on steel? I’ve never ridden a Meivici built for me, so take that into account. But if one of Seerotta’s goals is to build the best bikes possible – especially given their heritage in steel – it makes me wonder if de-emphasizing steel was such a good idea. It makes sense economically to pursue carbon in today’s bike industry, no argument. But if extraordinary bikes are your mission…"

Ask my wife about her CDA and she'll tell u its the BEST bike she's ever ridden and she does not want anything else. I rode my Uniscasi Saturday and just can't believe that there is a better bike out there for the $$$ invested. Our new Co-Mo Torpedo Co-Pilot tandem is Steel and we can't wait to ride that puppy since our old tandem was Aluminum. YES Climb my firend it looks like the bike biz went with the current of the times which is Carbone !! Not that theres anything wrong with that :banana:

BTW enjoy your new machine and ditto to SO Climb !

Grant McLean
12-03-2007, 03:45 PM
Over the last four or five years, I owned over 30 bikes.

wow.


-g

fiamme red
12-03-2007, 03:59 PM
wow.


-ghttp://forums.thepaceline.net/showpost.php?p=360913&postcount=6

"I have had a lot of experience with custom road bikes, having owned more than 30 custom bikes in the last 5 years."

Grant McLean
12-03-2007, 04:18 PM
http://forums.thepaceline.net/showpost.php?p=360913&postcount=6

"I have had a lot of experience with custom road bikes, having owned more than 30 custom bikes in the last 5 years."

It would make things a lot easier if you could ride before you buy.
That comes from my experience too!

Like, say have Atmo or Dario drop off a half dozen samples,
and pick the one you want to send in for paint...
Keep dreamin' !


:banana:

-g

swoop
12-03-2007, 04:29 PM
gawd i hate you. i want i want i want. fug.

....


james... you know i love those wheels... but i gotta tell you if you don't want to deal with that little bit of wind up and want to keep the cruise going.. try some reynolds 42c's. they're everything good about the cosmics sans the wind up.
....

man that bike is haunting me.

J.Greene
12-03-2007, 04:37 PM
It would make things a lot easier if you could ride before you buy.

Like, say have Atmo or Dario drop off a half dozen samples,
and pick the one you want to send in for paint...

-g

G,
I'm going to buy a track bike from japan. Send me what you have. i'll pay for 1/2 the shipping.

JG

Louis
12-03-2007, 04:40 PM
Free pair of socks?

If that's all, then Climbo should raise his prices...

Matt Barkley
12-03-2007, 09:59 PM
Climb/James,
Great review! You put thoughts to words, and you do that very well. (Not that you need me to tell you) :beer:

Agreed with Swoop. Carbones are great wheels. I would throw some Campy Neutrons (shim cass. body) or even Dura Ace wheels on there for the long haul. Carbones for your 20 minute hammer-fests do sound perfect, though.
Question about the build.. Any reason for the Thompson Seatpost and no set-back? Just curious.. I like white saddle and tape for that paint. Benotto!
-I love that paint -
I am curious if Dario is going to be using those lugs (I mean dropouts, sorry) for the future and on which bikes.. So far I have seen them on newer Responsoriums, including the 2 from Vegas - mine and a couple other have the "previous" version.
Enjoy many miles! :beer: -matt

shinomaster
12-03-2007, 10:17 PM
I guess it won't rust either:)

sw3759
12-04-2007, 05:12 AM
Matt,what "lugs" on the Responsorium are you referring to :confused:


"I am curious if Dario is going to be using those lugs for the future and on which bikes.. So far I have seen them on newer Responsoriums, including the 2 from Vegas - mine and a couple other have the "previous" version."

Climb01742
12-04-2007, 05:23 AM
Climb/James,
Great review! You put thoughts to words, and you do that very well. (Not that you need me to tell you) :beer:

Agreed with Swoop. Carbones are great wheels. I would throw some Campy Neutrons (shim cass. body) or even Dura Ace wheels on there for the long haul. Carbones for your 20 minute hammer-fests do sound perfect, though.
Question about the build.. Any reason for the Thompson Seatpost and no set-back? Just curious.. I like white saddle and tape for that paint. Benotto!
-I love that paint -
I am curious if Dario is going to be using those lugs for the future and on which bikes.. So far I have seen them on newer Responsoriums, including the 2 from Vegas - mine and a couple other have the "previous" version.
Enjoy many miles! :beer: -matt

matt, i believe dario is using the new drop-outs now on all respo's. about the seatpost: with the rails on a regal, and the seattube diameter, this thomson was the best choice to get the seat where it needs to be. i've never been a fan of no-setback posts, but somehow it looks kinda "right" here. i will try various wheels. it'll be fun to see how they impact the ride. we thought about white tape/saddle but...with a new england winter here, white didn't seem too practical...plus, the white of the paint has a hint of green in it, so matching whites to this white wouldn't be easy. but dario is trying to see if fizik will do a little something special for this bike with a custom color for saddle/tape. might be something nice for spring. :D

cs124
12-04-2007, 05:35 AM
Superb write up. Thanks for spending so much time and effort.

I, too would love to hear how the Unicorn performs with some lighter wheels and on some steeper terrain. Somehow I think the answer will be "fantastic".

jeffg
12-04-2007, 02:16 PM
matt, i believe dario is using the new drop-outs now on all respo's. about the seatpost: with the rails on a regal, and the seattube diameter, this thomson was the best choice to get the seat where it needs to be. i've never been a fan of no-setback posts, but somehow it looks kinda "right" here. i will try various wheels. it'll be fun to see how they impact the ride. we thought about white tape/saddle but...with a new england winter here, white didn't seem too practical...plus, the white of the paint has a hint of green in it, so matching whites to this white wouldn't be easy. but dario is trying to see if fizik will do a little something special for this bike with a custom color for saddle/tape. might be something nice for spring. :D

Climb,

Great review and set up.

I am likewise tickled with my Marcelo that I waited quite a while for.

I find the Marcelo perfect for climbing/desending. My favorite test is hill repeats like the three times up Geysers this Saturday (4 miles at 8.5%, with a few gravel sections).

I think the Love#3 or the Hampsten Z1 are a bit more comfortable, but the Marcelo is at least as comfortable as the Legend, and the Legend still has completed the most double centuries of all my bikes (so far).

I have a suspicion I would choose a Responsorium for the hammer fests you prefer, and I wonder how you would feel about a Marcelo like mine with longer chainstays (almost 42cm) for the type of riding I normally do ...

erector
12-06-2007, 12:58 AM
first off, great story, terrible pictures.

I'm really glad to hear someone's opinion on the Responsorium, especially in comparison to other top line bikes. My Marcelo is the godsend bike I, like you, were waiting for. Being a bigger rider, I can't say I've had the same back issues with the Marcelo, but I do believe the Responsorium would be a bit easier on the joints.

30 bikes - Holy Tamole - I wish I had a couple of your paychecks. If you rode my size, I'd ask you for frames.

Please do keep up with that 6-month reply, and wish Dario all the best.