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maunahaole
11-29-2007, 03:34 PM
The boarders have their thread. What do the skiers got going on? Where do you like to ski? What conditions do you prefer? Let us know how much of a gear whore you really are!

I lived in Norcal for a long time. I have skiied numerous days at Alpine Meadows. Due to my current domestic situation, I only get back to the mainland for a short time each year. I've been lucky enough to have had some great powder days at Alpine. Spring conditions there can be great as well, particularly if you are willing to hike a little bit and ski the back side of the mountain. The view from the top of keyhole cant be beat.

Current quiver is Volkl P50 F1 worldcup GS ski in a 193. Super fast and stable, lots of grip and rebound. A good hard snow ski. I also have a Fischer Big Stix 84 in 190 length for soft snow, crud and pow.

PoppaWheelie
11-29-2007, 03:39 PM
Gear whore? Me...? Phsst, you must have me confused with someone else. :)

I have a set of yet un-tried Gotamas sitting in my garage just waiting for that special day at Kirkwood...yum. Fat is the new black.

saab2000
11-29-2007, 03:43 PM
I suck at skiiing. But I love it.

I went first time about 4 or 5 years ago in St. Moritz and was hooked.

If I had to do it all over again I might well just learn how to be a skiier and be an instructor in the Alps in the winter. And ride my bike in the summer.

Really. Seriously. Too old to start that now I think. But I love the whole thing about it, especially in Europe.

Karin Kirk
11-29-2007, 03:48 PM
Current quiver is Volkl P50 F1 worldcup GS ski in a 193. Super fast and stable, lots of grip and rebound. A good hard snow ski. I also have a Fischer Big Stix 84 in 190 length for soft snow, crud and pow.

Wow, you like long skis, eh?
Your description of the Volkl is spot on - those are fun skis.

Poppa - I hear those Gotamas are sweet too. Fat rules, indeed!

I am a big fan of the quiver approach (that's just another way of saying gear whore).
I usually keep a stable of 4 pairs - one for tele, and three sets of alpine in the 70, 80, and 90-ish mm waist widths. All of this is supported by the fact that I work at the ski area and have an convenient locker room right there so I can be selective with gear for every task.

I find it quite hard to get skis that I like. Lately I have not had a great track record. But once I find the right ones, I tend to ski the cr@p out of them.

Karin Kirk
11-29-2007, 03:50 PM
If I had to do it all over again I might well just learn how to be a skiier and be an instructor in the Alps in the winter. And ride my bike in the summer.



Based on your pic in the 'who are you' thread, I'd say you definitely have "the look" to be a European ski instructor! After you master that, the rest is easy.

Ozz
11-29-2007, 03:54 PM
I suck at skiiing. But I love it.....
+1

Didn't start until I was in my late 20's....then got a girlfriend who didn't ski....then decided I sucked so much I didn't want to get hurt cuz I was so old. No downhill skiing for me nowadays....a little X Country...but I kinda suck at that too. :cool:

Mt. Baker & Whistler / Blackcomb were my favorites.....

maunahaole
11-29-2007, 04:06 PM
I like the big skis because I'm a fatass 6'4" guy. I had a pair of 215 Rossi SuperG a few years back that were just unreal as long as you were going at least 30mph.

Kirkwood is a great area that is impossible to get to when the weather turns. Best to be there already when the snow flies. I was up there several years ago in October mountian biking when it snowed. My buddy and I rode up the cat walk through about 2" of fresh to the top of Caples crest lift. Kinda cool seeing the single tire track in the snow...I had a great powder day there once, it was blowing so hard that everything was filling back in each time down - it never really got too cut up or skied out. Multiple laps on the old double chair on cornice. Nice pucker factor coming over the top of the lift to unload.

Tom
11-29-2007, 04:22 PM
We were out for the JOs in Truckee in 2005 (was it that long ago?!) and hit Alpine Meadows and Squaw Valley. I much preferred Alpine Meadows - Squaw was way too Killington for my tastes.

The only times I've skiied out west I've just been killed by how much mountain there is and how few people there are. You can start thinking you're a really good skier when you're not trying to avoid a million squid.

I own one pair of skis, Rossi Bandit XX, I believe 183 could be 185 back before they added the extra X. Decent skis but I believe that I want something shorter and more like a stick. They really flex under my weight now. Could be I need to learn how to use them, I still ski like I have straight skis when I'm not thinking.

DarrenCT
11-29-2007, 04:30 PM
i go to Deer Valley Utah every year in March for a week to ski it up.

anyone around the area then? this year i'll go by myself...

cheers
-d

alembical
11-29-2007, 04:45 PM
I absolutely love skiing and will likely get more than 50 days in this year, which says a lot about someone with a job and living in a city. Most of my days are spent on G3 Reverends (telemark), Head Supermojos (alpine), or Head i.m. 88 (alpine/bc). I am just stoked that the snow finally started falling and the local resort (Mt Hood Meadows) just announced they are opening more lifts for Friday :banana:

Have a great season everyone!

Alembical

Birddog
11-29-2007, 05:08 PM
I'm not really an equipment whore even though I am a PT Instructor. I have an older pair of Volkls, Carver Motion or something like that and a newer pair of Dynastars, can't remember that model either, but they are a slalom cut and my current faves. I ski in Technica boots that have had about $300 worth of modifications (canting), and I use Leki poles (carbon). I was raised Catholic so Telemarking doesn't do much for me. I get in about 20 to 30 days a year, not bad considering that the mtns are over 500 miles away in NM. I have been an instructor at Angel Fire for 20 years but this year I'm switching over to Red River. My favorite is Taos of course.

Birddog

chuckred
11-29-2007, 05:20 PM
Currently a CO front range skier/ I70 traffic sitter. Mainly Breck or Vail. Previously lived in Park City and SLC (1980 - 1995). Helped open Deer Valley (the lodging company) in the resort's first year open. Used to know pretty much every stash in every nook and cranny at PC and DV. Also could get around Solitude and the 'Bird pretty well.


Skiis: Rossi Bandit XXX 178's - a few years old. They do it all - pleanty fast for me. Bandit XX's - 184. Fun, but don't handle crud nearly as well as the XXXs. Fischer RC4 GS 205's from around 1990. Like a classic steel bike. Haven't used them for 5 years though...

Daughters are both on the dark side - boarders... oh well, I tried.

9 inches of new snow yesterday, but still very thin base, may not get up until after the holiday rush unless it starts to dump.

slowgoing
11-29-2007, 05:20 PM
Season pass holder at Mammoth and June the last 10 years or so, but head up to the Tahoe resorts just as often. Once I tried Volkls, I never tried anything else. The stability is outstanding.

I also started boarding about ten years ago. Love it. Much more of a natural motion for me.

scrooge
11-29-2007, 05:31 PM
Frontrange as well--have a few 4 packs at Keystone since my pal has a condo there I can crash at.

I really don't know what I'm doing or if I bought the right skiis when I started last year, but I have a pair of 182 "Salomon Hots" (Stupid name) that I bought on a whim (and are probably too short for me?)

manet
11-29-2007, 06:08 PM
fischer RCS skate

Bittersweet
11-29-2007, 06:08 PM
Former USSA and FIS racer from long ago. Went away to boarding school at 13 for better coaching. Had a lot of superstars around me but never became one myself. Post-racing took up tele full time into the '90s. Lived up at Alta for a season. Two more living down in SLC. Cousin raced on the World Cup snowboard circuit so took up snowboarding on his left over sponsor stuff for a while(nothing like learning on a 185 GS board with hard boots - eek). Now back to alpine and xc but all methods of sliding have there place and are fun.

Starting the cycle over again with two little kids back east. Both are up and skiing all over the hill and I can use poles again instead of skiing around holding a child between my legs. I ski on whatever I can scrounge up at the right price from those still in the business. Currently 184 Dynastar GS race with a lot of plate (can't remember exact details but they are fine). 190 K2 AK Launcher flexed out to full noodle status but can't bear to buy a new pair of powder skis.

My thanks to Karin Kirk who gave us great advice last year for our trip to Big Sky. (First time not to Alta in at least 10 yrs). We got super lucky and had 40" of new in the first couple of days on an overall super bony year in the west. My apologies for not thanking her until now.

sellsworth
11-29-2007, 06:23 PM
I'm an avid skier but I'm sorry that I can't bear to talk about it yet because of the paltry amount of snow that we have here at Tahoe. It may storm a bit next week though.

Blue Jays
11-29-2007, 06:35 PM
favorites:
Snowbird, Alta, Lake Tahoe, Steamboat Springs, and Bad Gastein

equipment:
older Rossignol with Marker bindings and Dolomite boots

Doc Hollywood
11-29-2007, 07:04 PM
Have skied in almost 60 different places in the US and Europe.

Favorites: Alta (I have a Utah License plate says "SKI-ALTA" and it was on my car when I lived there. My Jeep had "SNOWMAN" (Utah Plate). My current plate says SKI-UT. Unfortunately the state I live in hasn't gone to seven alpha-numerics yet. My other favorite Utah place is Snowbasin.

Sun Valley is great weather and skiing if your into L-O-N-G beautifully machined corduroy snow runs.

Alpine Meadows is nice. I have been there only once and it dumped 15 inches of snow. The back side was surreal with all that snow. Squaw is okay, but it looks like a zoo on the weekends. Homewood is absolutely the bomb after a fresh dump.

Steamboat is nice, but it is big and it's somewhat difficult to get from here to there as the area has like 5 separate mountains.

Vail is like Disneyland (crowds and too many criss crossing trials) on the front side, but the bowls are great. I liked Copper and Winter Park/MJ.

On the East Coast, I like Wildcat and Mad River. Sunday River is good too for glade skiing if they have fresh snow.

My ski quiver has changed from: Fisher 202 Softs (1980 ish) 185 cm, to a series of 200 cm K2's, then a pair of Dynastar Vertical Assualts 207's. I current own a pair of K2 Axis Pros 188 cm and a pair of Salamon XScreams 195 cm. I ski mostly the Salomons. My Dynastars have been converted to teleboards, but I am going to get a set of newer tele's this year.

This year the ski destination is Big Sky.

Best skiing goof - At Alta there is a run called Alf's High Rustler. Basically it is 1900 vertical feet, approximately 60 feet wide and roughly a constant 35 deg pitch down the front side of the ski resort. After taking 30 minutes to take the lift and traverse over to it, I made three turns, my first ski popped, I tried to recover and stop which forced the other ski to pop and I slid 1700 vertical ft to the bottom. I stopped on a little cat-tract near the bottom. There was no way I was hiking back up to get my skis. Fortunately a guy and gal strapped one on each of their packs and brought them down to me.

Doc

Karin Kirk
11-29-2007, 07:13 PM
I really don't know what I'm doing or if I bought the right skiis when I started last year, but I have a pair of 182 "Salomon Hots" (Stupid name) that I bought on a whim (and are probably too short for me?)

How tall are you and how much do you weigh? (in order to answer your question about ski length)
I had a similar pair of Salomons like those 2 years ago. I agree that Salomon has got to do better with their names, although they nailed it with the "Pocket Rocket" which is still my favorite ski of all times!

Bittersweet - I'm so glad your Big Sky trip worked out with that bountiful snow. That is a fun mountain, esp the tram.
You have quite the ski background - cool!

Larry D
11-29-2007, 07:31 PM
Currently, I am working at Sugarbush in VT, so most of my skiing is in the Mad River Valley and a lot of my cycling is here too. I love being able to get away from my office during the day and get a few runs in when there are not many people on the slopes, like today.

My favorite areas have to Chamonix and the Stubai Glacier. Skied at Heavenly last january and I was not impressed. Will be trying Alta, Deer valley and Snowbird this winter, inbetween OR and SIA. It is a rough life, but someone has to do it.

Currently I am skiing on Volkl AC40 Unlimited Carbons.

Think snow, get outside enjoy the white stuff either hiking, skiing, boarding or snowshoeing. It is all good. :banana:

djg
11-29-2007, 08:01 PM
Precious few days of skiing now that I live down south in Virginia -- a handful of one-day trips up into southern Pennsylvania each year and a short trip out west, almost always to Utah in recent years. Three days a week are long, long gone. There are lots of great places to ski and, although I've been around a bit, I doubt I've really scratched the surface, especially abroad. I keep going back to Alta -- my favorite so far, hands down. Skied around a fair bit in Utah and Colorado, had one excellent week in Taos once and a single really beautiful day at Squaw Valley on a "work trip," took some turns on the glacier on Mt. Hood one spring -- up and down the part of the east coast that has skiing, especially New York, Vt, and NH -- a little bit in Austria and a little in Canada, eh?

Special shout out to Bristol Mountain, NY, up by dbrk -- it ain't great, but it seemed dandy when the Pittsford-Mendon high school ski team was paying for the lift tickets.

Not much of a gear ho, although my stuff is perfectly respectable. If I find a good pair of boots that fit, I tend to hold onto them -- same pair of Tecnicas for seven or eight years now I guess. Boards are Volkl AX3s. Pair of budget-ish composite poles. Giro helmet. Socks, undies, shells, advil, beer.

Doc Hollywood
11-29-2007, 08:42 PM
I'm a Pittsford Sutherland Grad. Class of early 80's.

I only skied Bristol once when I was in HS. Heavy wet snow and rain and it was still fun.

Doc

djg
11-29-2007, 09:29 PM
I'm a Pittsford Sutherland Grad. Class of early 80's.

I only skied Bristol once when I was in HS. Heavy wet snow and rain and it was still fun.

Doc

Excellent. Class of ... um, '78 here. Going on 30 years? Yikes.

Might have been heavy wet snow at Bristol that day but by the next morning it was probably frozen rock solid.

northbend
11-29-2007, 09:33 PM
I already posted on the Snoboarding thread about my home area: Alpental. It is truly a gem especially if you like your snow with a high water content. Maybe that keeps people away and that's OK. It's a small area with alot of chutes, steep bowls and trees and we don't need more people skiing there anyway :-)
Other local favorites are Crystal Mountain and Whistler/Blackcomb. Those areas are huge and I can ski them all day and still have something left in the tank but Alpental is intense - I am typically fried after 4 or 5 hours. Skis? The 'good ones' are 193 Stockli Stormriders, the rock skis are 198 Stormriders (the original version). I also have an old pair of 210 Phoenix telemark skis I usually take out for the first day of the year. I ski them alpine style with Leather Asolos on 3 pins - it's a great way to start the season...I go slow and find my balance, and after a few runs, put em away before I kill myself. After that, modern skis are a peach. I also believe that all methods of sliding have their place when it comes to fun. I have a Subaru WRX that is an absolute blast to drive in the snow. Powerslides are so much fun.

tch
11-29-2007, 09:36 PM
skiing calls for ice skates. By 11:00 some days, you might only have a 5-foot border next to the trees that's got any kind of surface. Got a pair of Fischer RX-8's last year in 170, and I'm liking them. They're narrow and overly cut (126 in the shovel and 66 in the waist) but, for most of the East, 3" counts as powder, and anything more is mashy, so floatation isn't really an issue. The premium is on edge-hold and quickness.

When I go west, I like the big places with good snow: Steamboat, Snowmass, Alta. Big Sky has been on my wishlist for a lotta years. I've skied my skinnys in 8/9", but I'd like to have the opportunity to try out some wider boards in deeper conditions. Even so, I'm not sure I've ever seen the need for anything past the mid-80's in terms of waist width. If you westerners really ski conditions where you regularly need more float than that, I'm way jealous.

I've read about Bridger, Karin, and I'm jealous. It seems like it might be the definition of dream local hill.

72gmc
11-29-2007, 09:48 PM
I am a lifetime skier and former ski shop rat. If I was still a gear whore I would be embarassed about my equipment underfoot at this time.

Due to job and family (I don't have my kids skiing yet) I get precious few days a year.

Due to just plain obstinacy I still ski on Solomon Equipes, Power 8 size (about 204cm). Despite their age, they have so few days that they still fly, and they were/are a great ski. I should step up to the modern age but they're so much fun--and it's hard for a guy who grew up on pro deals to pay full retail.

Plus I enjoy the people that imply that I must not be very good based on my equipment choices.

northbend
11-29-2007, 09:51 PM
72 GMC, I like your style!

72gmc
11-29-2007, 09:55 PM
Let's hit Alpental some time and you can enjoy it in person. Used to ski patrol up at Ski Acres (I know, I know, but there is some fun to be found there and it was a free 100 days a year).

There was a time when triple digits was a normal season... I miss that...

northbend
11-29-2007, 10:13 PM
I am up for that. PM sent

Bud
11-29-2007, 10:32 PM
Late to the party- should've checked the forum at work today...

I switched to tele a few years ago and never looked back. It is fun and challenging. I find that if I concentrate and work at it, I can do really well. If I get too lazy, I lapse into para-tele which sucks. I alpined for many years, and used to be the Mt Manager at Snowy Range in WY for a couple of years back in the early 90's.

My favorite skiing is in the backcountry of the front range (Indian Peaks, etc)or at A-Basin. My wife (a boarder) and I get the CO pass every year, which is a season pass to A-Basin, Keystone, Breck, and 10 days at Vail and/or Beaver Creek. We used to spend more time at Breck, which I still like, but it's really getting overrun with poseurs. I still like it on quiet good snow days. Vail has great terrain for both of us, but they often lie about their snow conditions (you guys know it's true). A-Basin is our go-to area. I just hope it doesn't go the way of the rest of summit county.

This weekend will be our first time this season which is a much slower start than the last 2 years.

Drop the knee, yo...

Oh- I ski on 175 BD Nunyos and dig my Garmont Synr-G's... I'm a gesr hog- can't wait to test my new go-lite softshell (Sastrugi). It looks like it'll kick a$$

Tom
11-30-2007, 06:20 AM
For somebody that lives out east and skiied as much as I have I've been to surprisingly few mountains. That said, Whiteface is the best experience I've had out here. I like runs that aren't over as soon as they start and there's plenty of variety there. There are also several runs that can truly frighten you. And if I'm ever up when the Slides are open, I still ain't going over there.

djg
11-30-2007, 08:24 AM
For somebody that lives out east and skiied as much as I have I've been to surprisingly few mountains. That said, Whiteface is the best experience I've had out here. I like runs that aren't over as soon as they start and there's plenty of variety there. There are also several runs that can truly frighten you. And if I'm ever up when the Slides are open, I still ain't going over there.

My best friend growing up had a place in the Addies -- further south so we were more likely to go to Gore or even scoot across to Pico or Killington, but we'd make it up to Whiteface sometimes. Sometimes the snow was pretty hard. Sometimes the breeze seemed to be coming down out of the arctic circle. But there really were some killer runs there and when things were good, they were very good.

tch
11-30-2007, 09:09 AM
Sometimes the snow was pretty hard. Sometimes the breeze seemed to be coming down out of the arctic circle. But there really were some killer runs there and when things were good, they were very good.
Definition of Eastern skiing.

scrooge
11-30-2007, 09:26 AM
How tall are you and how much do you weigh? (in order to answer your question about ski length)
I had a similar pair of Salomons like those 2 years ago. I agree that Salomon has got to do better with their names, although they nailed it with the "Pocket Rocket" which is still my favorite ski of all times!

Bittersweet - I'm so glad your Big Sky trip worked out with that bountiful snow. That is a fun mountain, esp the tram.
You have quite the ski background - cool!

6' 7", 215-228lbs.

Karin Kirk
11-30-2007, 09:59 AM
6' 7", 215-228lbs.

Yeah, you can safely go with long skis. Probably in any given model the longest or second longest size they come in would be appropriate for you. So in a carvy ski the mid 180s make sense. For a fatter, freeride type ski, 190-something would work.

Keystone is fun - super cruising runs! That was the first mt I worked at, and was the beginning of my addiction to the ski bum lifestyle.

Bud - I'm with you, I love A-Basin! I'm so glad it's been able to retain its charm while the rest of Summit County has exploded. A-Basin and Bridger have a lot in common.

jim in pc
11-30-2007, 10:35 AM
I get about 60 days a year. 35 or so days of that is on the weekends plus a few vacation days, usually with my brilliant and beautiful wife, often with our darling 5yo daughter. The rest is masters race training at night. A couple masters races here and there. All in all, a well-balanced diet of gates, powder and steeps, and the bunny hill with hot chocolate and cookie breaks.

Almost all of that is at Park City. We get season passes there and it's a 7 minute drive - 12 or so if we take the city bus that stops across the street from the house. Even though there is *a lot* of great skiing nearby, it's tough to get motivated to go elsewhere.

Gear-wise, I don't feel like a gear whore but my credit card bills tell a different story. I try to limit things to one major hard goods purchase a year. So between boots, SL, GS, and free skis, that's a four year rotation. I wouldn't mind slipping a pair of SuperGs in there somewhere, but it hasn't happened yet.

I'm glad the changes in ski design has quieted down a bit; for most of the last 10-12 years there was no way a four year old ski was even close to current. It doesn't matter much for free skis but it makes a huge difference in gates. I've still haven't found my way to the fat ski party.

The current quiver is some Head GS race stock new last year (188s), some Fischer SLs (161s) that I got third-hand off US World Cup guy Steve Nyman - a truly phenomenal pair of skis that are getting a bit tired and lifeless and are a tad too short for me - and some K2 XT Pros (181s). I've been planning to replace the Fischers this year, but I might replace the K2s instead. I just had new orthotics made and new liners foamed yesterday.

We've got enough man-made snow to get out and shake the cobwebs out, but we need a series of major storms before the season really gets going. I've been out once so far.

scrooge
11-30-2007, 12:08 PM
A-Basin is our go-to area. I just hope it doesn't go the way of the rest of summit county.

This weekend will be our first time this season which is a much slower start than the last 2 years.



Bud (and Karin)--mind if I ask why you like A-Basin? I've not been there (just started skiing last year). May have to try it out...

I'm just hoping for more snow in the next few weeks (I'm hoarding my 8 passes until more lifts/runs are open).

chuckred
11-30-2007, 01:24 PM
Almost all of that is at Park City. We get season passes there and it's a 7 minute drive - 12 or so if we take the city bus that stops across the street from the house. Even though there is *a lot* of great skiing nearby, it's tough to get motivated to go elsewhere.


I lived there from 1980 - 1985 when I moved to SLC, but still worked at Deer Valley until 1988.

It's a small world - ran into an old ski buddy on a different forum while preparing for my first Leadville 100...

saab2000
11-30-2007, 01:44 PM
I will be going on the bunny hills in Mich Mich fairly soon. Gotta learn how to do this right.

There is only one (quasi-legit) sport that approaches cycling for sheer outrageousness in my eyes and that is World Cup Downhill skiing. Super G is pretty cool too. But for me it's the Downhill.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=f6FfzLQjyDY&feature=related

BTW, the first picture is somewhere over Switzerland. If you look closely you can see the lifts.

The second was taken on a green run in Alta in Utah, three years ago. I have fun on green runs. The blue ones are less fun. My goal would be to become comfortable on the blue runs this winter.

djg
11-30-2007, 01:52 PM
I will be going on the bunny hills in Mich Mich fairly soon. Gotta learn how to do this right.


The second was taken on a green run in Alta in Utah, three years ago. I have fun on green runs. The blue ones are less fun. My goal would be to become comfortable on the blue runs this winter.

saab, the green runs at Alta are pretty flat, but a lesson or two should have you comfortable on some of the blue ones, and they have some nice rolling cruisers you might really enjoy if the snow is good. They open up much more of the mountain -- top to bottom -- for you. Ultimately, it's nice to be able to ski the mountain there as there's all sorts of cool terrain (and long lived snow) in places that don't necessarily have labels on the main trail map, but the canyon is beautiful and it's all good.

jim in pc
11-30-2007, 02:14 PM
chuckred, haven't lived here that that long. We were here in '01/02, left for while, and have been back since fall of '04. We're hoping to stick around.

Saab, agree on downhill. It's not a sport, it's a cult. Bib #31 (Raich) in the gate at Beaver Creek as I write this. At the moment, the top 8 are within 4/10ths of a second. Tough way to make a living.

maunahaole
11-30-2007, 02:25 PM
skiing = campagnolo

snowboarding = shimano

Karin Kirk
11-30-2007, 02:37 PM
Nice pics Saab!
The Swiss photo has me drooling (or is it that pumpkin bread I just baked?).

Your jacket in the other photo is very similar to our old instructor jackets from a few years back. See, I told you that you had "the look!"

djg's advice is spot on. If you are competent on greens, a few lessons will help you bridge that gap between green and blue.

My advice for lessons is to go for private lessons. You get a lot more bang for your buck and at smaller resorts they are not too pricey. I would ask at the ski school desk who their popular adult instructors are and then book with one of them. Usually the top instructors are booked up, so call in advance to reserve a slot. If the lesson goes well you can continue with that person and pick up right where you left off. This is by far my favorite way to work and folks make fast progess this way.

Group lessons are a bargain, but you may be limited by the others in the group. My guess is that you are more athletic than most (better balance, more coordinated, better at taking coaching input and using it to make changes) so you may end up feeling like you are not getting too much out of a group lesson. However there is sometimes a fun social aspect in a group lesson, plus you can learn from watching others.

Alternatively you can point your plane to BZN and I'll give you a crash course (yes, pun intended).

saab2000
11-30-2007, 03:04 PM
Nice pics Saab!
The Swiss photo has me drooling (or is it that pumpkin bread I just baked?).

Your jacket in the other photo is very similar to our old instructor jackets from a few years back. See, I told you that you had "the look!"


Alternatively you can point your plane to BZN and I'll give you a crash course (yes, pun intended).

Yeah, the jacket's a good one. Same with the pants! Got the whole thing on sale in St. Moritz at the end of the season in 2001 or 2002. Spyder. Good stuff and a great price.

How's the skiing in BZM? Affordable? Lodges? Lessons?

I would love to come out to go skiing and talk bikes with the Kirks!

Karin Kirk
11-30-2007, 06:16 PM
How's the skiing in BZM? Affordable? Lodges? Lessons?

I would love to come out to go skiing and talk bikes with the Kirks!

I'm speaking from a biased point of view because I live here, but the skiing out here is a really fun experience.

We have three ski areas within an hour or less from Bozeman. I teach at Bridger Bowl, which is a mere 16 miles from downtown. Bridger is a gem in this day and age of corporate ski resorts. It's community-owned, which means the price of everything (lift tickets, lessons, food) is incredibly low when you compare it to other ski areas. I think tickets are $43 this year. The food in the lodges is home-made and the baked goods are like something your Mom would serve up.

The ski experience at Bridger is the real deal. The lifts are the old, slow kind, which is fine because it limits how many people are on the hill. Most of the time, though, that's a moot point because on a typical weekday the place is luxuriously empty. We get tons of snow and have top-notch grooming on the groomers. Much (most) of the mountain in ungroomed and offers fabulous bowls, bumps and chutes. This is what Bridger is best known for. The top of the mountain is accessible by hiking only. It's a ski mountaineering type of experience that is oh-so-fun.

Bridger does not have slopeside lodging, which is one of the reasons it's so pleasant there. The base area has a grand total of 4 buildings. When you look down the hill from the lift, you see trees, snow and mountains, not condos and strip malls.

So lodging is 16 miles away in town, and there are a variety of options. There is one nearby BB, actually - but after that everything's in town.

The other ski areas here are Big Sky and Moonlight Basin. They are more like the traditional destination resorts. They are also quite empty compared to UT, CO and CA resorts. Big Sky has an amazing tram that goes to the tippy-top, and offers dizzying views and kick-a$$ expert skiing. Prices there are in line what you'd pay at other destination resorts. A Big Sky ticket is $75.

Like I said, I'm biased, but I think Bridger offers a great low-hassle, low-glitz ski experience. We have a very low turnover with our employees and you get smiles from everyone all day long.

OK, sorry if that sounds like a sales pitch, but it's from the heart, honestly!

We would love to be your Bozeman guides, Saab, if you choose to make the trip! An open invitation to other forumites too!

djg21
11-30-2007, 08:59 PM
I absolutely love skiing and will likely get more than 50 days in this year, which says a lot about someone with a job and living in a city. Most of my days are spent on G3 Reverends (telemark), Head Supermojos (alpine), or Head i.m. 88 (alpine/bc). I am just stoked that the snow finally started falling and the local resort (Mt Hood Meadows) just announced they are opening more lifts for Friday :banana:

Have a great season everyone!

Alembical

Love the Revs. Awesome in the pow, crud and mashed potatoes. i have some of those and a set of Tickets, both set up with Hammerheads. The Tickets are awesome in the East. My third set is a set of Fischer SBounds with g3 Ascents. Use them in the BC.

maunahaole
11-30-2007, 09:17 PM
I've heard great things about Bridger. If I ever make it to Montana in the wintertime, I'll have to go.

Tch - as far as your take on east vs west/fat vs narrow et. al. : The super fat skis do better not only in deep pow, but they help even more once it gets cut up some and more importantly, when it isn't super light. In places where there can be high water content (tahoe) it can make the difference between having a blast of a day or working as hard as you can to keep your legs from breaking. They do tend to flop around a lot and skid when the cover gets packed or frozen a little bit. The west coast conditions are different than the rockies in a number of ways, mainly having to do with the ocean influence as opposed to the arctic air influence.

I had one of my best powder days ever on an old pair of elan rc sl boards - kicking it old school stenmark style... Almost ANY good ski works in the nice pow, the marginal pow is where the technology helps more.

andy mac
11-30-2007, 09:59 PM
in what seems like a previous life, late 80's, early 90's, i was racing quite unsuccessfully around the globe. raced all the big dudes stenmark, eberharter, bode etc.

my austrian coach, a 2-time world champion, pulled me aside and said "what does your dad do for living?"

i told him he sold earth moving equipment.

he said "look at me, i was the two-time world-champion and i'm standing on the side of the hill trying to make you faster through red and blue gates. i'm 40 years old, live in a crappy apartment and own a used subaru. you are never even going to be a world champion, go do something else."

ouch. but good advice.

skiing was a job. interesting how many ex-olympians don't ski much now. they are into golf, motorcycles etc. nice to start a new chapter.

i'm happy to explore the world of bikes and surfing. still get a slide in when i can on the skis or snowboard but vacations now involve tide charts and wave forecasts. wax on!!

next year i want to get into racing enduro bikes


:beer:


ski pick: even though i was sponsored by atomic and have well over 20 pairs they are collecting dust - i reach for my volkls - love 'em.

board pick: burton supermodel - they just did a limited re-release. sweeeeet ride!

resort: verbier switzerland

lunch: germknodel!

saab2000
11-30-2007, 11:17 PM
in what seems like a previous life, late 80's, early 90's, i was racing quite unsuccessfully around the globe. raced all the big dudes stenmark, eberharter, bode etc.

my austrian coach, a 2-time world champion, pulled me aside and said "what does your dad do for living?"

i told him he sold earth moving equipment.

he said "look at me, i was the two-time world-champion and i'm standing on the side of the hill trying to make you faster through red and blue gates. i'm 40 years old, live in a crappy apartment and own a used subaru. you are never even going to be a world champion, go do something else."

ouch. but good advice.

skiing was a job. interesting how many ex-olympians don't ski much now. they are into golf, motorcycles etc. nice to start a new chapter.

i'm happy to explore the world of bikes and surfing. still get a slide in when i can on the skis or snowboard but vacations now involve tide charts and wave forecasts. wax on!!

next year i want to get into racing enduro bikes


:beer:


ski pick: even though i was sponsored by atomic and have well over 20 pairs they are collecting dust - i reach for my volkls - love 'em.

board pick: burton supermodel - they just did a limited re-release. sweeeeet ride!

resort: verbier switzerland

lunch: germknodel!

Good story. But typical of the Swiss/Austrian/German mentallity. If you can't be world champ, quit. :crap:

Too many cyclists stop too. Good at it, but no passion for it. Look at Andy Hamptsen. Looks like he could ride the Giro again tomorrow. That's the mentality I like.

Anyway, skiing is cool.

Downhill very fast. Dangerous and seductive.

Ray
12-01-2007, 07:47 AM
I haven't skied in over 15 years, but I skied every day for a few years in the early '80s and was a pretty serious black diamond bump skier back when skis were skis. Skied once or twice when I had a desk job in Tucson and LOVED it, so I moved to Telluride and stayed for a few years, working a couple of days a week on the ski mountain for my season's pass and rent and in restaurants at night to keep me in skis and food. Sometimes played guitar in bars for beer and pizza on my off nights. It was NOT a difficult life to get used to :cool: .

This was before Telluride had an airport and had developed the back side of the mountain and it was a hard core ski area that tourists pretty much couldn't get to from there. On weekends, we'd get locals from Montrose and Grand Junction crowding up the place, but during the week just the handful of hardcore tourists who were willing to drive a long way to get there. And the locals. No lift lines EVER during the week (except Christmas week and Presidents Day). It was not an economically viable situation and the town built and airport and a second ski area and TONS of hotels a few year later. But it was a purist's heaven for those few years before reality hit.

Skiing every day in all conditions gets you pretty good pretty fast. By the middle of my first season, I could ski with the best on the mountain. I never got as good as the best four or five folks on the mountain, but I got good enough that they asked me to ski with them a lot. And it was a wierd hierarchical system where you had to be asked or they could put some pretty serious hurt on you. On my best days, I could hang pretty well, but never as smooth as the best. I still remember them - a couple of lifetime local bums who looked like ***** but LORD could they ski, one slick dude in from California and almost as good, and a beautiful Austrian ski instructor who I'd have followed to the ends of the earth and who was the most economical skier I'd ever seen - made the toughest turns look effortless. Every now and then some famous racer from out in the world would show up for a week and ski with them too.

We'd spend all morning on the bump runs up around lift six and then come down via the Spiral Stairs for lunch and at the end of the day. The Stairs was the toughest run on the mountain (and toughest I've ever done), but it took several lifts to get from the bottom to the top, so you only did it a few times a day. 3100 vertical feet of incredibly steep fields full of VW sized moguls. The Plunge was next door and was the famous run that the tourists skied (and bought tee-shirts that bragged about it) - it was tough but you could survive it with moderate skills so everyone had to try it and, as a result, it got carved up into tiny little uneven bumps that sucked. But you didn't mess with the Stairs unless you knew what you were doing and anyone that could ski it had to ski it right.

My second year I spent almost totally on telemarks (before they'd really been adapted for alpine conditions, so we were skiing some pretty un-sturdy equipment in those days - there were only a few makes of three-pin skis that even had metal edges!) and got good enough to ski the whole mountain on them. Skiing the bumps on telemarks made you a really good skier but I never got good enough for it to be really fun. But then skiing the more open runs was such a smooth and beautiful blast on those skis. Alpine skis with your heels locked down in big plastic boots felt sort of crude after that, but I never gave 'em up completely.

In those days I skied on Atomic slalom skis for racing (which I did a little of) and a set of Pre's for everything else. They were a de-tuned slalom ski that were just forgiving enough to be awesome for everything I could throw at them except for super precise slalom racing. I'm a normal sized guy and, in those days, I skied on 207s. Everyone skied the longest skis you could turn back then - more stable at speed and fine in the bumps as long as the bumps weren't too small or chopped up. I remember trying a set of 180s for a couple of days and they were waaay too squirrelly. I haven't skied since the advent of these fat little ice skates you call skis these days. I'm told they're much easier to turn and still very stable at speed, but they sure look funny. I'm sure I'd love 'em if I ever got back into it.

I skied at several areas in Colorado and Utah - NOTHING else ever compared to the snow quality at Alta and Snowbird, but the terrain and quiet at Telluride in those days was unbeatable and the snow was pretty damn good. Once I moved up to Seattle I skied from time to time in the Cascade concrete at Snoqualmie and Stevens and Crystal. But I was spoiled by both the dry conditions in Colorado and the level of skiing I was able to do by doing it every day. And so I just never really took to being a weekend skier. And driving and hauling gear never did it for me after being able to walk or ski six blocks to the lifts every morning.

Since we moved back east, I tried it once or twice and decided to hang it up. Skiing is the one sport I actually have some glory days in and I never came close to living up to them again (starting to cycle in my late 30s had its benefits - nothing to try to match). And standing in line forever to ski for a couple of minutes on ice only to stand in line again? I'd had it too good to settle for that I guess. As I near 50, I don't have much desire to pick it up again, but every now and then something like this thread stirs the memories and makes me wonder how much fun it would still be to spend another winter out west being a bum.

-Ray

Hardlyrob
12-01-2007, 11:47 AM
I'm late tot he party, but a great thread.

Been skiing since I was 7 - so this is year 37 on boards for me. Current equipment is Rossi Bandit XX 174cm - shortest skis for me since jr high school, Nordica speed machine 14 boots I got last year on closeout - great boot for me. Other skis - Olin SL Comp 207 - man can they fly, Rossi Strato - complete with the hideous brown topskins - had them since about 1980, and they are old friends. It's harder for me to ski the long skis since a bad cartilage tear in my right knee and ensuing arthritis, but I still take them out now and then.

I've been lucky to ski many different areas in the east and west. My wife took up skiing on our honeymoon in 2000 at Steamboat - what a brave woman! Western favorites are Winter Park / MJ and Big Sky - both are spectacular mountains, with more than enough terrain for anybody. Winter Park just has a really fun and friendly vibe. In the east Sugarbush and Okemo are favorites. We usually do a week in March alternating west and east, and get up to Vermont or NH for days here and there. Typically 10 to 15 days on the mountains, 20 is a good year.

I echo Karin's advice about lessons. I take one every year, and learn a little something here and there that makes me a better skier. The good news is if you're in group lesson in one of the more advanced groups, you often end up with a private lesson.

Favorite funny story - we were at Bretton Woods in NH for a day - wouldn't recommend it, not a great area - anyway, I was skiing the antique Rossi Stratos just for grins that day. Went in for lunch at one of the on mountain restaurants, and there was a newer pair of Stratos screwed to the wall as decore. I asked if I could trade, since the ones in the restaurant were in better shape than mine, and the manager said no - but did get a laugh out of it.

Cheers!

Rob

djg
12-01-2007, 12:06 PM
Good story. But typical of the Swiss/Austrian/German mentallity. If you can't be world champ, quit. :crap:



I dunno, I think it's more complicated than that. I started skiing really late and raced at a seriously mediocre level in high school, but I knew people who were good there and in college. There's loving something and then there's loving all the work and sacrifice, month in and month out, year in and year out, that keeps you in the running for the B team. Do you love every hour in the weight room? Every night on the road or in a dorm? How far into your twenties or thirties? Do you want to be doing something at the age of 30 that makes it more likely that you'll be struggling financially -- forget about prosperity -- when you're fifty or sixty? I went to an Ivy League college that happened to have one of the best college ski teams in the country. People went back and forth to the US Ski Team. A guy in my dorm dialed it down and quit the men's B team because he just couldn't break through to the A team, even though he was getting some good times. He still did some racing for the college, but he had other opportunities -- both for himself and the world -- and decided to get on with his life.

Austria has depth in Alpine skiing -- always somebody or several who have a shot at the top rung, but then a bunch more at a level below that, and a big bunch more below that. I'm not criticizing those who choose to sacrifice, or find a way to eke out a living at the edges, I'm just saying that lots of folks need to make choices and everybody, including hermanators, must eventually figure out what the rest of life holds.

link
12-01-2007, 01:38 PM
I'm sorta like Bittersweet - grew up kiddie racing in So Penn and went on to race in college.

I worked for Volkl USA outta Banner Elk, NC repping a virtually unknown ski line. Then one day Volkl exploded in the market and I slipped away to become a 'puter geek in CO. But those days were good days - SIA in Vegas - Hawaiian Tropic girls - Klaus Obermeyer - pure sin.

Put leathers on my feet and started pinnin' in the late 80s and never looked back to alpine again.

I work as a part-time tele destructor at A-Basin with my wife and part-time at a backcountry and cycling retail store in Dillon. We like mellow backcountry because I'm not young and dumb and CO BC is scary for anything steeper than 30 degrees We live a few minutes from Keystone. I worked at Copper forever until I got a clue 15 years later and gave up my comuputer geek pocket protector to be a realtor. Don't hate me.

I'm all about the plastic and burly tele skis and bindings. G3 Tickets, K2 Work Stinx, K2 Anti Piste - all Hammer Head and all T1 and TRace. I'd probably kill myself on leather boots today.

One of my most memorable days of skiing was at Bridger. It was awesome and stupid cold all at the same time.

csm
12-01-2007, 04:28 PM
went up to the local ski hill today. they made snow for a rail jam for the boarders and jibbers. ended up buying a new ski jacket. it was deal.
blizzard something or other skis

andy mac
12-01-2007, 09:04 PM
I haven't skied in over 15 years, but I skied every day for a few years in the early '80s and was a pretty serious black diamond bump skier back when skis were skis. Skied once or twice when I had a desk job in Tucson and LOVED it, so I moved to Telluride and stayed for a few years, working a couple of days a week on the ski mountain for my season's pass and rent and in restaurants at night to keep me in skis and food. Sometimes played guitar in bars for beer and pizza on my off nights. It was NOT a difficult life to get used to :cool: .

This was before Telluride had an airport and had developed the back side of the mountain and it was a hard core ski area that tourists pretty much couldn't get to from there. On weekends, we'd get locals from Montrose and Grand Junction crowding up the place, but during the week just the handful of hardcore tourists who were willing to drive a long way to get there. And the locals. No lift lines EVER during the week (except Christmas week and Presidents Day). It was not an economically viable situation and the town built and airport and a second ski area and TONS of hotels a few year later. But it was a purist's heaven for those few years before reality hit.

Skiing every day in all conditions gets you pretty good pretty fast. By the middle of my first season, I could ski with the best on the mountain. I never got as good as the best four or five folks on the mountain, but I got good enough that they asked me to ski with them a lot. And it was a wierd hierarchical system where you had to be asked or they could put some pretty serious hurt on you. On my best days, I could hang pretty well, but never as smooth as the best. I still remember them - a couple of lifetime local bums who looked like ***** but LORD could they ski, one slick dude in from California and almost as good, and a beautiful Austrian ski instructor who I'd have followed to the ends of the earth and who was the most economical skier I'd ever seen - made the toughest turns look effortless. Every now and then some famous racer from out in the world would show up for a week and ski with them too.

We'd spend all morning on the bump runs up around lift six and then come down via the Spiral Stairs for lunch and at the end of the day. The Stairs was the toughest run on the mountain (and toughest I've ever done), but it took several lifts to get from the bottom to the top, so you only did it a few times a day. 3100 vertical feet of incredibly steep fields full of VW sized moguls. The Plunge was next door and was the famous run that the tourists skied (and bought tee-shirts that bragged about it) - it was tough but you could survive it with moderate skills so everyone had to try it and, as a result, it got carved up into tiny little uneven bumps that sucked. But you didn't mess with the Stairs unless you knew what you were doing and anyone that could ski it had to ski it right.

My second year I spent almost totally on telemarks (before they'd really been adapted for alpine conditions, so we were skiing some pretty un-sturdy equipment in those days - there were only a few makes of three-pin skis that even had metal edges!) and got good enough to ski the whole mountain on them. Skiing the bumps on telemarks made you a really good skier but I never got good enough for it to be really fun. But then skiing the more open runs was such a smooth and beautiful blast on those skis. Alpine skis with your heels locked down in big plastic boots felt sort of crude after that, but I never gave 'em up completely.

In those days I skied on Atomic slalom skis for racing (which I did a little of) and a set of Pre's for everything else. They were a de-tuned slalom ski that were just forgiving enough to be awesome for everything I could throw at them except for super precise slalom racing. I'm a normal sized guy and, in those days, I skied on 207s. Everyone skied the longest skis you could turn back then - more stable at speed and fine in the bumps as long as the bumps weren't too small or chopped up. I remember trying a set of 180s for a couple of days and they were waaay too squirrelly. I haven't skied since the advent of these fat little ice skates you call skis these days. I'm told they're much easier to turn and still very stable at speed, but they sure look funny. I'm sure I'd love 'em if I ever got back into it.

I skied at several areas in Colorado and Utah - NOTHING else ever compared to the snow quality at Alta and Snowbird, but the terrain and quiet at Telluride in those days was unbeatable and the snow was pretty damn good. Once I moved up to Seattle I skied from time to time in the Cascade concrete at Snoqualmie and Stevens and Crystal. But I was spoiled by both the dry conditions in Colorado and the level of skiing I was able to do by doing it every day. And so I just never really took to being a weekend skier. And driving and hauling gear never did it for me after being able to walk or ski six blocks to the lifts every morning.

Since we moved back east, I tried it once or twice and decided to hang it up. Skiing is the one sport I actually have some glory days in and I never came close to living up to them again (starting to cycle in my late 30s had its benefits - nothing to try to match). And standing in line forever to ski for a couple of minutes on ice only to stand in line again? I'd had it too good to settle for that I guess. As I near 50, I don't have much desire to pick it up again, but every now and then something like this thread stirs the memories and makes me wonder how much fun it would still be to spend another winter out west being a bum.

-Ray


i know what you mean about getting worse at something. i struggle with that too. but hey, that's life... and you, if it helps, were never that good anyway!

;)

take a week off - get back on the horse. you'll love it. < 50 is too young to give up.

:beer:

Ray
12-01-2007, 11:53 PM
i know what you mean about getting worse at something. i struggle with that too. but hey, that's life... and you, if it helps, were never that good anyway!

;)

take a week off - get back on the horse. you'll love it. < 50 is too young to give up.

:beer:
WHAT - not that good?!?!?!? :beer:

Not to worry - I fully realize how far I was from world class in any competitive sense - not even in the minor league version of the league you skied in. Or even remotely close. But it was the one sport I think I did come damn close to reaching my potential in. For a while, I was skiing bumps and powder about as well as I think I ever could have and never even had to try to ski the blue runs at speed. I got way into the zone on a fairly consistent basis. Racing, not so much, but racing made me a much better technical skier which made me better everywhere else. And hey, I was very close to as good as the best skiers in town in a town with some damn good skiers - I've never been very close to the best in town in football, basketball, tennis, golf, cycling, or tiddly-winks. So I'll take my glory days where I can find 'em, thanks!

Its not that I couldn't enjoy skiing again, but the memory both of what I could do and the conditions I was able to do it in (the combination of snow, terrain, lack of crowds, scenic beauty, the ability to walk to the lifts after breakfast - all of that) makes the skiing I can do regularly in Pennsylvania today not sound very good at all or even worth doing on the occasional weekend. If my life was such that I could take another couple of years and go live in a ski town again, I'm sure I could enjoy that a lot. But its not - I'd have to make too many sacrifices of things that are important to me. And, having been there and done that, that's NOT that important to me.

I'm not exactly world class on a bike either, but I started late enough in life to have never even had any illusions or real goals, other than to enjoy myself and ride enough to be able to comfortably do a somewhat difficult tour each year. My definition of somewhat difficult changes with time too! :cool: But I live in an area that's as good for riding as Telluride was for skiing (a much easier criteria to meet, admittedly) and I can do it as much as I want, at least 9-10 months of the year. So I do.

-Ray

andy mac
12-03-2007, 12:00 AM
WHAT - not that good?!?!?!? :beer:

Not to worry - I fully realize how far I was from world class in any competitive sense - not even in the minor league version of the league you skied in. Or even remotely close. But it was the one sport I think I did come damn close to reaching my potential in. For a while, I was skiing bumps and powder about as well as I think I ever could have and never even had to try to ski the blue runs at speed. I got way into the zone on a fairly consistent basis. Racing, not so much, but racing made me a much better technical skier which made me better everywhere else. And hey, I was very close to as good as the best skiers in town in a town with some damn good skiers - I've never been very close to the best in town in football, basketball, tennis, golf, cycling, or tiddly-winks. So I'll take my glory days where I can find 'em, thanks!

Its not that I couldn't enjoy skiing again, but the memory both of what I could do and the conditions I was able to do it in (the combination of snow, terrain, lack of crowds, scenic beauty, the ability to walk to the lifts after breakfast - all of that) makes the skiing I can do regularly in Pennsylvania today not sound very good at all or even worth doing on the occasional weekend. If my life was such that I could take another couple of years and go live in a ski town again, I'm sure I could enjoy that a lot. But its not - I'd have to make too many sacrifices of things that are important to me. And, having been there and done that, that's NOT that important to me.

I'm not exactly world class on a bike either, but I started late enough in life to have never even had any illusions or real goals, other than to enjoy myself and ride enough to be able to comfortably do a somewhat difficult tour each year. My definition of somewhat difficult changes with time too! :cool: But I live in an area that's as good for riding as Telluride was for skiing (a much easier criteria to meet, admittedly) and I can do it as much as I want, at least 9-10 months of the year. So I do.

-Ray

it ain't about how good anyone is or isn't. i read a passion in your words and think you'd really enjoy even a few days on a decent hill reacquainting yourself with an old love.

:beer:

arcteryxman
12-03-2007, 12:36 PM
Gear whore? Well... not really.. not enough money for that!

I picked up a pair of Blizzards from about 10 years ago for $75, threw on some used rossignol bindings for $50 and swiped my father's old boots- they were suitable for most stuff- until i started teaching- so I used the free rentals.

It was hard to teach kids on parabolics with non-parabolics.

I would LOVE a new pair of skis, probably tele- i like the black diamond zealots for their width and float capability.

72gmc
12-03-2007, 12:50 PM
I still love downhill skiing, but I really want to try cross country and telemark. Cross country because my wife would join me, telemark because it looks hard and I like that. I just wonder if my rebuilt knee would permit telemark. I can't pull my heel to my butt.