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View Full Version : New Goodrich in BQ


goonster
11-28-2007, 12:15 PM
The Goodrich in the new BQ is fantastic.

Curt has created a chainrest (loosely based on the old Nivex system, iirc) which occupies the position of the outermost cog. Eight cogs from a nine-speed cassette are mounted on a seven-speed hub (I hope I got that right), and the shifter lets you shift right onto the chainrest. You can remove the rear wheel without ever having to touch the chain with anything.

Now that it's published, perhaps Curt can post pictures.

e-RICHIE
11-28-2007, 12:55 PM
it's a stellar review atmo.
major league props to cpg afaik.

H.Frank Beshear
11-28-2007, 01:08 PM
Sweet looking (http://www.vintagebicyclepress.com/images/Goodrichfull.jpg) frameset. Nice job Curt. Search the records I remeber seeing a closeup of the chain thingie. Frank

J.Greene
11-28-2007, 01:12 PM
Very Nice Curt!

JG

dauwhe
11-28-2007, 01:12 PM
WOW!!!!

My BQ hasn't arrived yet, but this looks like a stunner!

Eager to see the chainrest system. That always sounded cool...

Dave

zeroking17
11-28-2007, 01:36 PM
clap...clap...clap

mschol17
11-28-2007, 01:56 PM
It's not fair to us east coasters for you west-coasters to taunt us this way...

I've been looking at the photos of that bike for awhile, though.

Steve Hampsten
11-28-2007, 02:23 PM
Groovy bike, Curt does beautiful work and I'm not accusing him of talking the customer into anything - but does it make sense to give up a cassette cog simply to avoid dealing with the chain when removing the rear wheel?

(I get that it's one of those goofy French things Rene Singer did back in the day that we can kinda/sorta do today - like rubber slap guards and Jan's sealed BB)

Opinions?

dauwhe
11-28-2007, 02:25 PM
I wouldn't give up my biggest cog, but would sacrifice my smallest!

But I haven't seen how this all works yet.

Dave

dbrk
11-28-2007, 02:30 PM
Hmmm. I know that I wouldn't have asked for this cog arrangement/chain rest but, as Steve notes, it's one of those French things and they are easy to understand once you use "French" as an adjective.

I'm not speakin' for Curt or anything but I bet he did it because it's a harmless thing that the customer asked for. If it were a colossally stupid thing we can all be rest assured Curt wouldn't have done it.

I like the low seatpost but I'd done without the riser stem and just built that into the overall. But again, it's a preference almost certainly in the customer's taste and it's just fine. This is a greatfriggin'bike as well as a friggin'greatbike.

dbrk

cdp
11-28-2007, 02:32 PM
Another beauty from Curt. A true pleasure to work with. Hopefully I'll have some pictures to post soon.

fiamme red
11-28-2007, 02:32 PM
I wouldn't give up my biggest cog, but would sacrifice my smallest!Same here. Randonneurs don't need big gears.

dauwhe
11-28-2007, 02:34 PM
And my biggest gear is 44 x 12! I don't think I've ever even shifted into that gear...

Dave

bigtime
11-28-2007, 02:40 PM
gawd that bike looks nice. the fork is freaking beautiful, as is the whole bike, but that fork....! i love the idea of the chain rest; wouldnt use it myself, but having the idea and the execution of it is wonderful. hear, hear.

Grant McLean
11-28-2007, 02:42 PM
And my biggest gear is 44 x 12! I don't think I've ever even shifted into that gear...

Dave

99 Gear inches isn't that small.

About the same as 52 x 14

-g

sg8357
11-28-2007, 02:48 PM
The bike has a SON front wheel, meaning bolted on with with cable with spade lugs, a pain to remove.
So if you transport your bike in car like me, you remove the rear wheel.
My night bike with a SON wheel, is ultra 6, there is room for a 7 speed
freewheel but I don't miss the gear.

semi-ot, Anyone else have dedicated night bikes ?
I put one together every fall for night riding season.

Scott G.

gt6267a
11-28-2007, 02:50 PM
Groovy bike, Curt does beautiful work and I'm not accusing him of talking the customer into anything - but does it make sense to give up a cassette cog simply to avoid dealing with the chain when removing the rear wheel?

(I get that it's one of those goofy French things Rene Singer did back in the day that we can kinda/sorta do today - like rubber slap guards and Jan's sealed BB)

Opinions?

i agree that a wheel change is not all that hard so in one sense, why bother. that said, i have a bike with 8 speeds and one with 10. both work just fine and i pretty much don't use the 11 or 12 cog on either bike. taking away a gear i don't use for some convenience ... i kind of like it.

Lifelover
11-28-2007, 03:38 PM
.... but does it make sense .....

Opinions?


Trying to make sense when it involves a high end luxury item is pointless.

ATMO

We like what we like.

Fixed
11-28-2007, 03:42 PM
99 Gear inches isn't that small.

About the same as 52 x 14

-g
g.m. :beer: what do you use up there ?
cheers

dauwhe
11-28-2007, 03:54 PM
The bike has a SON front wheel, meaning bolted on with with cable with spade lugs, a pain to remove.
So if you transport your bike in car like me, you remove the rear wheel.
My night bike with a SON wheel, is ultra 6, there is room for a 7 speed
freewheel but I don't miss the gear.

semi-ot, Anyone else have dedicated night bikes ?
I put one together every fall for night riding season.

Scott G.

I have a quick release on the SON. The light connectors aren't a big deal if there's the right amount of slack in the cable. I take the front wheel off all the time to put the bike in the car.

My day bike is my night bike!

Dave

goonster
11-28-2007, 04:31 PM
The bike has a SON front wheel, meaning bolted on with with cable with spade lugs, a pain to remove.

Not only do I have a quick release on the SON, the light carrier sits on the axle, so there are no complications to wheel removal whatsoever.

I would definitely ask for a chain rest like this, but until now I would not have conceived of this as a possiblity in this day and age.

Ahneida Ride
11-28-2007, 05:36 PM
Oh how I lust for a CG !!!!

He just speaks to me ....

cpg
11-28-2007, 05:38 PM
I don't want to post pictures of the chainrest here. That would be disrespectful to our hosts so I won't go there. Besides the pictures in the review are better than what I have. Hopefully our hosts won't mind my comments but I don't think I'll do very many of the chainrests because I doubt there's a big demand for them. Still it's kind of interesting that it can be done. Remember beige is the new tan.

Curt

Steve Hampsten
11-28-2007, 05:59 PM
Remember beige is the new tan.


Does this mean black can go back to being the New Black?

Grant McLean
11-28-2007, 06:17 PM
g.m. :beer: what do you use up there ?
cheers

On the road I rock the 52/42 12-23 but wear out the 19/18 cog with the 52
cause i spend 90% of my time in that gear.

fixed i roll 48x17 cause i have a hill that i need to get up.
on the beater/single speed commuter, i roll 44x17 cause I just coast on the downhill
becuase i'm a lazy mo-fo.

-g

palincss
11-28-2007, 07:20 PM
Hmmm. I know that I wouldn't have asked for this cog arrangement/chain rest but, as Steve notes, it's one of those French things and they are easy to understand once you use "French" as an adjective.

I'm not speakin' for Curt or anything but I bet he did it because it's a harmless thing that the customer asked for. If it were a colossally stupid thing we can all be rest assured Curt wouldn't have done it.


There's more to those French chain rests than sheer Gallic perversity and an independent tradition of out-of-the-box engineering solutions. Consider the illustration here: http://www.vintagebicyclepress.com/Singerbrochure.html
Those chain rests were used on bicycles with derailleurs mounted on the chain stay, that could not be swung out of the way. Getting a wheel out when the derailleur's firmly in the way and can't be moved aside must, I imagine, be a challenging exercise.

It's obvious from the photograph http://www.vintagebicyclepress.com/images/Goodrichfull.jpg
that this bike has a modern, dropout-mounted rear derailleur. So while the chain rest might be a convenience (even a convenience the owner felt was worth sacrificing one sprocket) it's certainly not a necessity.

On the other hand, is giving up one cassette cog such a sacrifice? Even with a "mere" 8 or 9 sprockets, big-gear fans can still have their 11 or 12 tooth small sprocket. If I recall correctly, the biggest reason folks here like their Shimano 10 spd drivetrains is the shape of the brifter, not the extra sprocket.

e-RICHIE
12-01-2007, 03:23 PM
my copy arrived.
hey curt atmo -

:beer: :beer: :beer:
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