PDA

View Full Version : Conti GP4000 tubulars?


djg
11-27-2007, 07:26 PM
Has anybody tried them?

Thanks

Ahneida Ride
11-27-2007, 07:45 PM
I would never ride conti ... i've seen to many sidewall issues.

On the other hand .... Sandy thinks these issues are resolved.

remember the Firestone 500 .... then years later the tire issues on Ford Explorers?

One bitten .... twice shy.

Grant McLean
11-27-2007, 07:55 PM
I would never ride conti ... i've seen to many sidewall issues.

One bitten .... twice shy.

Personal experiences on tires will always be variable you can't control.
For many years I rode the comp 240 tire, and easily
had over 100,000 km accumulated on Conti tubulars without a
flat/failure, unless you call riding them down to the threads a
shortcoming...

-g

djg
11-27-2007, 08:05 PM
I would never ride conti ... i've seen to many sidewall issues.

On the other hand .... Sandy thinks these issues are resolved.

remember the Firestone 500 .... then years later the tire issues on Ford Explorers?

One bitten .... twice shy.

Well, ok, but I haven't really heard of any problems with Conti competition tubulars, which are pretty hard wearing tires, IME. I'm asking about this particular tire from Continental -- obviously, you don't have to buy it if you have soured on the brand, but it sounds like you haven't tried it.

Too Tall
11-27-2007, 08:13 PM
Ahneida, unless I am waaay off the mark your recollection is restricted to (ick) clinchers. That was a real deal problem. Their tubulars otoh is real fine and I too am waiting to wear out an arm load of spares before giving them a try. MORE CHOICES woo hoo.

11.4
11-27-2007, 08:13 PM
I've ridden four of them at this point and have two more on a pair of track wheels. They are extremely round (much better than prior Comps or Sprinters ever were). Suppleness is very good but very pressure sensitive (more so than with prior versions). They glue up really well because there's no stitching ridge on the centerline of the basetape. The tread is different but the rubber is quite sticky on corners and in the wet. My perception is that rolling resistance is less, but I don't put too much in that -- it's not measured plus rolling resistance isn't the biggest problem or asset of a tire. They can be found at a good price and ride well. I just prefer a tire I can patch the old fashioned way with needle and thread.

handsomerob
11-27-2007, 11:45 PM
I would never ride conti ... i've seen to many sidewall issues.

On the other hand .... Sandy thinks these issues are resolved.

remember the Firestone 500 .... then years later the tire issues on Ford Explorers?

One bitten .... twice shy.

with that logic.... I hope you don't ride Michelins either :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005_United_States_Grand_Prix


... I hate to admit it, but as an attendee of the debacle, I won't use Michelin on car or bike. :rolleyes:

chrisroph
11-28-2007, 12:38 AM
why would conti offer a tubular that is vulcanized around the tube so it can't be repaired if punctured? is it because so few people actually patch and repair tubular punctures? this hardly seems an advacement.

i must concede however that i can't remember the last time i repaired a high end tubular. i seem to wear out the good ones and puncture and throw away the cheap few i have ridden over the last several years.

11.4
11-28-2007, 12:44 AM
why would conti offer a tubular that is vulcanized around the tube so it can't be repaired if punctured? is it because so few people actually patch and repair tubular punctures? this hardly seems an advacement.

i must concede however that i can't remember the last time i repaired a high end tubular. i seem to wear out the good ones and puncture and throw away the cheap few i have ridden over the last several years.

I think you hit the nail on the head. Plus, it's cheaper to automate a fully circumferential tubular casing than to pay for all the hand assembly.

chrisroph
11-28-2007, 12:55 AM
I think you hit the nail on the head. Plus, it's cheaper to automate a fully circumferential tubular casing than to pay for all the hand assembly.
its a shame. its getting harder all the time to get really good tubulars. veloflex are great but too expensive. the last batch of vittoria cx's i got, this past spring, were excellent tires at a fine price eve though they bear little relation to the cx and cg of old. the synthetic conti tubulars have been reliable, tough and great cornering tires even though they were somewhat lacking in compliance. but you could beat the snot out of them and they were great at alpenrose. i'm not sure i'll try the 4000's.

dave thompson
11-28-2007, 01:03 AM
with that logic.... I hope you don't ride Michelins either :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2005_United_States_Grand_Prix


... I hate to admit it, but as an attendee of the debacle, I won't use Michelin on car or bike. :rolleyes:
That wasn't the fault of Michelin as much as it was the intransigence of the FIA and organizers to make the necessary changes for safety. The tires were a problem (F1 is a tough mistress) and Michelin suggested steps for making things work. For the paying spectators (you) and the TV watchers (me) it was a FUBAR event, but to solely blame Michelin is pretty harsh.

djg
11-28-2007, 08:23 AM
Thanks guys -- I'm on the fence but at 60 bucks each I think I'll try a pair.

chrisroph
11-28-2007, 09:23 AM
my .02 is get some cx's from sdeals or similar at about $50 per.

11.4
11-28-2007, 11:42 AM
my .02 is get some cx's from sdeals or similar at about $50 per.

Bottom line, I'd agree. Some riders just do better with punctures for whatever reason on Contis (Grant, for example), so they should ride Contis. If someone doesn't have historical experience with a particular brand (good or bad), I tend to suggest Vittorias as a good starting point, then try Veloflexes for an upgrade or, if punctures are a problem, try Contis.

obtuse
11-28-2007, 11:44 AM
best machine built tire in the world. round, fast, and sticky.

jerk

Fixed
11-28-2007, 11:49 AM
bro i'd get them all the smart cats say they are good
cheers

Too Tall
11-28-2007, 01:51 PM
Two guys I trust ride them and have good things to say...hmmmmm. If the price is right maybe. Chaps my arse they can not be repaired. I may get over it.

djg
11-28-2007, 01:54 PM
Bottom line, I'd agree. Some riders just do better with punctures for whatever reason on Contis (Grant, for example), so they should ride Contis. If someone doesn't have historical experience with a particular brand (good or bad), I tend to suggest Vittorias as a good starting point, then try Veloflexes for an upgrade or, if punctures are a problem, try Contis.

I love the Veloflex tires -- I'm running some now and have a couple of carbons stretching. It makes sense to stick with that which I like the best. At the same time, they're not cheap and I've also had good luck with Contis even if they don't seem as nice (putting some of last year's Comp 25s on my fixie now, as I've found them to be good quality long wearing tires in the past). There's something to be said for having some slightly less expensive alternatives that are still good, round, and grippy -- like others, I've got more than one set of wheels.

BdaGhisallo
11-28-2007, 02:20 PM
Are the GP4000s any easier to mount than the Competition or Sprinter tubs? The last time I tried Contis, it was a pair of Competition tubs and it took all my strength to get them on the rim!! Stretching them before gluing up helped not a bit. It was no fun.

Are these GP4000s any better/easier in that regard. My baseline for comparison these days is the Veloflex Carbon tub but they are getting very spendy, and I can source the Gp4000 out of the UK for about $65 a pop.

What say the experts?

Geoff

Ahneida Ride
11-28-2007, 05:38 PM
Ahneida, unless I am waaay off the mark your recollection is restricted to (ick) clinchers. That was a real deal problem. Their tubulars otoh is real fine and I too am waiting to wear out an arm load of spares before giving them a try. MORE CHOICES woo hoo.


Sorry T**2 You are correct Sir ...

Too Tall
11-28-2007, 06:10 PM
Are the GP4000s any easier to mount than the Competition or Sprinter tubs? The last time I tried Contis, it was a pair of Competition tubs and it took all my strength to get them on the rim!! Stretching them before gluing up helped not a bit. It was no fun.

Are these GP4000s any better/easier in that regard. My baseline for comparison these days is the Veloflex Carbon tub but they are getting very spendy, and I can source the Gp4000 out of the UK for about $65 a pop.

What say the experts?

Geoff
Geoff. the last last last thing you do before putting the tyre on the rim is to re-stretch it. I let the last base tape glue layer dry completely allowing me to use a bare foot and hands to re-stretch...going all the way around the tyre several times than pop it on asap. That will help alot.

davids
11-28-2007, 06:54 PM
And what's the deal with Bontrager tubies? They can't possibly be making their own, can they?