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overmyhead
07-03-2017, 04:17 PM
Occasionally I like to read a cycling related book - fiction or non. I thought I'd start a thread and see what everyone else has read that they've enjoyed.
One of my favorites (and a bit difficult to find) is called "The Hour" by Michael Hutchinson. Highly enjoyable.
Currently reading "The Masked Rider" by Neil Peart - drummer for Rush. I've never been a big Rush fan but he is (IMO) a very good writer.
Any and all absurd, obscure, or mainstream cycling books you can think of that you've enjoyed are welcome. Lets get a list going...

bobdenver1961
07-03-2017, 04:19 PM
Merckx - Half Man Half Bike

Team 7 - Eleven

19wisconsin64
07-03-2017, 04:30 PM
The Bicycle Diaries by David Byrne. Yes, David Byrne of the Talking Heads band.

Sorta kinda like a lightweight version of Zen and the Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance. Insights and thoughts of Cycling, and how it relates to communities and the world. Thoughts you may have yourself when renting a bike visiting a different country and just pedaling around with extra time on your hands. Great book!

FlashUNC
07-03-2017, 04:32 PM
The Race Against the Stasi.

cgolvin
07-03-2017, 04:49 PM
Sex, Lies and Handlebar Tape: The Remarkable Life of Jacques Anquetil

beeatnik
07-03-2017, 04:55 PM
Ten Points by Bill Strickland

Abusive fathers, marriage, parenthood, affairs and Thursday Night Worlds. And as with Bill Strickland, always the nobility of suffering. It's good, whatever.

Brian Cdn
07-03-2017, 05:21 PM
My fav.

Tomorrow We Ride, by Jean Bobet.

A hard to put down classic read. Jean a pro rider, brother of 3 time TDF winner Louison Bobet.

Dana Kilalps
07-03-2017, 06:33 PM
The Wheels of Chance: A Bicycling Idyll is an HG Wells novella about a young novice doing a trip in the English countryside having a chance encounter with a sort of like-minded young woman set before the turn of the century. Kind of a nice time warp.

choke
07-03-2017, 07:56 PM
Major Taylor: The Extraordinary Career of a Champion Bicycle Racer by Andrew Ritchie

ebaker205
07-04-2017, 07:58 AM
Picked up Dog in a Hat after hearing about it on here. Great behind the scenes story of an American rider attempting to peddle his way up the European cycling milieu.

Great stuff. I wonder how much has changed considering there are only three Americans in the 2017 tour.

jumphigher
07-04-2017, 09:12 AM
Anything by Samuel Abt. He's imo the best writer as far as pro cycling/racing goes, never get's slow or stodgy in his books.

I also thought 'The Eagle of Toledo' - the story of Federico Bahamontes was pretty well written, though by a different author.

Cycling books seem really hit and miss to me, many are dull as dishwater..

bikinchris
07-04-2017, 09:14 AM
Major Taylor: The Extraordinary Career of a Champion Bicycle Racer by Andrew Ritchie

This.
As well as "The Fastest Bicycle Rider in the World" by Marshall W. "Major" Taylor
Out of print

"Roads Were Not Built For Cars" Carlton Reid
Explores the relationship between bicyclists, pedestrians and auto drivers.

"Hearts of Lions" Peter Nye
Describes early American bicycle racing.
Out of print.

"A Social History of The Bicycle" Robert A. Smith
Explores the social, industrial and marketing changes brought about by the popularity of the bicycle.

overmyhead
07-04-2017, 09:16 AM
This is great! Keep 'em coming!
I read a mystery by Greg Moody called "Two Wheels" a few years ago. I don't recall it being a knockout. It is part of a series. Anybody read any of the others?

fmm
07-04-2017, 09:26 AM
Putting in a plug for a book I haven't yet read: "21 Nights in July" by Ianto Ware. Has anyone read it? Looks so good! (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7363257-21-nights-in-july)

choke
07-04-2017, 09:31 AM
This is great! Keep 'em coming!
I read a mystery by Greg Moody called "Two Wheels" a few years ago. I don't recall it being a knockout. It is part of a series. Anybody read any of the others?I read that one and a couple of others of his when they first came out. I recall them being a fun read but certainly not great books.

paredown
07-04-2017, 10:06 AM
I still remember reading 'My World on Wheels'--an autobiography by a young Aussie who made the pro ranks in the '50s named Russell Mockridge--the book was published posthumously after he was killed on a training ride...

(When we were desperate for information about competitve cycling BTID this was the one book in our local library.)

Here's the Aussie DNB entry:
https://penguin.com.au/books/my-world-on-wheels-the-posthumous-autobiography-of-russell-mockridge-9780994352866

rustychisel
07-04-2017, 10:43 AM
Putting in a plug for a book I haven't yet read: "21 Nights in July" by Ianto Ware. Has anyone read it? Looks so good! (http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/7363257-21-nights-in-july)

Yeah, not bad. A slim volume and well worth a read, being armchair musings on cycling and it's sociological place.

Someone has to say Tim Krabbe 'The Rider' is the best book on cycling ever written, so it might as well be me.

Also enjoyed William Fotheringham's 'The Badger', but I'm a Hinault fan.

weiwentg
07-04-2017, 10:46 AM
In roughly chronological order:

It's Not About the Bike - Lance Armstrong and Sally Edwards

The Secret Race - Tyler Hamilton and Daniel Coyle

The majority of the affidavits from the US Anti-Doping Agency Reasoned Decision

Wheelmen - Reed Albergotti and Vanessa O'Connell

Edited to add a backstory. In my early 20s, I decided to pick up cycling. I browsed most to all of It's Not About the Bike in Borders (thus contributing to the decline of the bookstore industry). Armstrong was my hero. I bought his lines about cycling clean.

Cracks in his story started to show up in the mid 2000s. In retrospect, if I'd been more cynical, I would have been much more skeptical early on. But in the early 2000s, I was new to cycling. While I was intellectually aware of the sport's history of doping, it didn't sink in. Even in 2005, after the zip the lips incident with Simeoni, I was still willing to extend Lance the benefit of the doubt. I was willing to extend Tyler Hamilton the benefit of the doubt. By the time Floyd Landis got caught and banned, I was still willing to think, OK, he may have done something, but he did raise enough doubts in the testing process that he should have been found not guilty.

Lance's eventual ban, and all the discussion that came out of that, finally eroded my naiveté. Took too damn long, but people need to learn.

Clean39T
07-04-2017, 11:43 AM
Saw this yesterday at an IBD at the Oregon Coast:

The Invisible Mile: A Novel https://www.amazon.com/dp/1609453972/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_DD7wzb9YQD714

Description
Product Description
A re-imagining of a true story, The Invisible Mile is a novel about the capacity of the human mind and body when stretched to their absolute limits, written in prose that calls to mind the works of Marilynne Robinson and John Banville, as well as Colson Whitehead’s National Book Award-winning novel The Underground Railroad.

In 1928, the Ravat-Wonder cycling team became the first English-speaking peloton to compete in the Tour de France. The riders, from faraway New Zealand and Australia, were treated as exotics and isolated from their surroundings by a thick barrier of language and culture. Underfinanced and undertrained, the team faced one of the toughest routes in the race’s history, 5,476 kilometers over unsealed roads through a landscape heavy with the legacy of the Great War. 162 cyclists began the race that year, only 42 finished.

A deeply introspective and spiritual book, The Invisible Mile is narrated by a fictional rider from the Ravat-Wonder team. Speaking no French and knowing a scant few of his fellow riders, his race becomes a confrontation with memories of the Great War and a quest to understand his own place amongst its history. He rides on the alternating highs of cocaine and opium, pain and pleasure, victory and defeat. And as he nears the northern battlefields and his last, invisible mile, trauma, exertion, and his personal demons take over. The Invisible Mile is the story of one man’s struggle for survival in the face of physical and psychological hardship, a profoundly human story about guilt and redemption.

overmyhead
07-05-2017, 10:55 AM
That one looks good too. Thanks for the recommendation.

coffeecake
07-05-2017, 04:34 PM
Already mentioned:
Ten Points - Bill Strickland. This was very good. It is intense and I had to put it down a few times until I was ready to continue.
The Rider - Tim Krabbe.
The Secret Race - Tyler Hamilton and Dan Coyle. In the middle of this right now. It's good and has all the dirty secrets I wanted to know.

Others:
Into Thick Air - Jim Malusa. Travelogue of a bicycle tourist who travels to the lowest point on each of six continents. Not so much about cycling but very interesting and engaging.
Cycling in the South Bay - Seth Davidson. A collection of stories about cycling and life from a racer in Los Angeles. Some of these also exist on his blog pvcycling.wordpress.com. Seth has a distinct voice and it may not be engaging to everyone.

72gmc
07-05-2017, 06:04 PM
Also enjoyed William Fotheringham's 'The Badger', but I'm a Hinault fan.

If you haven't read it, find Memories of the Peloton by Hinault himself (or so the cover says). Published in 1989. So arrogant it's charming. So much scattering of opponents to the four winds.

rustychisel
07-05-2017, 06:32 PM
If you haven't read it, find Memories of the Peloton by Hinault himself (or so the cover says). Published in 1989. So arrogant it's charming. So much scattering of opponents to the four winds.

Yes, I almost bought a copy in France after skimming through it in a bookshop, but don't read French well enough, sadly. Thanks for reminding me.

azrider
07-05-2017, 06:54 PM
great book

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51k7bMcumhL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

gasman
07-05-2017, 07:29 PM
"Obsessive Compulsive Cycling Disorder" by Dave Barter

A funny book by a humble Brit about his love of cycling-it seems often in the rain and wind.

Fiertetimestwo
07-05-2017, 08:08 PM
French Revolutions and Giro-nomo by Tim Moore.

I found them both laugh out loud funny.

Black Dog
07-05-2017, 09:26 PM
This is great! Keep 'em coming!
I read a mystery by Greg Moody called "Two Wheels" a few years ago. I don't recall it being a knockout. It is part of a series. Anybody read any of the others?

I read the whole series. Entertaining with some great insight into road and MTB racing.

Black Dog
07-05-2017, 09:30 PM
Yeah, not bad. A slim volume and well worth a read, being armchair musings on cycling and it's sociological place.

Someone has to say Tim Krabbe 'The Rider' is the best book on cycling ever written, so it might as well be me.

Also enjoyed William Fotheringham's 'The Badger', but I'm a Hinault fan.

The rider is by far the best book (novel) ever written about racing a bike.

gdw
07-05-2017, 09:51 PM
https://www.amazon.com/Curious-George-Rides-Bike-Rey/dp/0395174449

cassa
07-05-2017, 09:54 PM
Paul Fournel's Need for the Bike is hard to describe. Here's a bit from the blurb:

An extended meditation on cycling as a practice of life, the book recalls a country doctor who will not anesthetize the young Fournel after he impales himself on a downtube shifter, speculates about the difference between animals that would like to ride bikes (dogs, for instance) and those that would prefer to watch (cows, marmots), and reflects on the fundamental absurdity of turning over the pedals mile after excruciating mile. At the same time, Fournel captures the sound, smell, feel, and language of the reality and history of cycling, in the mountains, in the city, escaping the city, in groups, alone, suffering, exhausted, exhilarated.

When I've recommended it to cycling friends, I've called it charming and they've agreed with that assessment after they've read it. It's also a very quick read --- it's short and broken into very short chapters of just a few pages each. I think I'll bring it to re-read on our summer bike and camp trip. Highly recommended.

merlincustom1
07-05-2017, 10:30 PM
In Search of Robert Millar was good.

johnniecakes
07-06-2017, 12:11 PM
I have read;
All the Armstrong books
The Badger
We were young and carefree by Laurent Fignon.

Enjoyed them all

cgolvin
07-06-2017, 12:15 PM
BTW, if anyone is interested in the Jacques Anquetil book I'd happily donate it if you want to pay the book rate shipping cost.
I know, probably cheaper to just buy it off Amazon, but thought I'd offer…

EDS
07-06-2017, 12:37 PM
Phil Gaimon's book, "Pro Cycling on $10 a Day", is a good read. Really makes you appreciate how tough it is to break into pro cycling and to stay there.

SpokeValley
07-06-2017, 02:18 PM
"The Road to Valor: A True Story of WWII Italy, the Nazis, and the Cyclist Who Inspired a Nation" is exceptionally well researched, engaging, and easy to read. It scratched my history and cycling itches.

Gino Bartali became a hero of mine after I read it. http://roadtovalorbook.com/

sales guy
07-06-2017, 02:23 PM
Still trying to get thru ours! Just never get the chance to read it.

73 Degrees. The Worlds Finest Bicycle Builders

And yep, I guess thats a shameless plug! lol

dougefresh
07-06-2017, 03:01 PM
great book

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51k7bMcumhL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

agreed. the follow up Come and Gone not so much.

Krabbe's The Rider is possibly my favorite book ever. It gets re-read every other year or so.

overmyhead
07-06-2017, 04:19 PM
Has anyone read "A Clean Break" by Christophe Bassons?

laupsi
07-06-2017, 05:21 PM
A classic for all types of riders, by Tim Moore

gasman
07-06-2017, 05:44 PM
"The Road to Valor: A True Story of WWII Italy, the Nazis, and the Cyclist Who Inspired a Nation" is exceptionally well researched, engaging, and easy to read. It scratched my history and cycling itches.

Gino Bartali became a hero of mine after I read it. http://roadtovalorbook.com/

I just received this book as a gift. Glad to hear of such a positive review.

azrider
07-06-2017, 06:02 PM
agreed. the follow up Come and Gone not so much.

Krabbe's The Rider is possibly my favorite book ever. It gets re-read every other year or so.

Good to know the sequel isn't worth reading. I'll def have to check out "The Rider"...........oh and DougEFresh was my nickname in highschool :p:hello:

ojingoh
07-06-2017, 07:08 PM
Two not mentioned:

Pedalare! Pedalare! by John Foote - Italy and racing in the 50s (mostly)
Etape by Richard Moore - 20 stories from the tour.

Lives2Ride
07-06-2017, 07:13 PM
Found this on InstaGram. n 1907, amid a time of unspeakable racial cruelty, the world’s most popular athlete was not pitcher Cy Young or Christy Mathewson. It wasn’t shortstop Honus Wagner, center fielder Ty Cobb, nor was he a baseball player. During a period of frequent lynchings, the world’s most popular athlete wasn’t even white. He was an oft-persecuted, black bicycle racer named Marshall W. “Major” Taylor.

At the height of the Jim Crow era, Taylor became an inspirational idol in America, Europe, and Australia, experiencing adoration so profound that it transcended race. Long before Jackie Robinson, people of all colors passed under Major Taylor billboards, exchanged Taylor trading cards, cooled themselves with Taylor accordion fans, and wore buttons bearing his likeness. When he competed, his admirers swarmed local streets, spilled out of “Major Taylor Carnival” trains, flooded the cafés, and waited for him in the rain outside packed hotels. His face stared out from newspaper pages on four continents. His appearances shattered attendance records at nearly every bike track and drew the largest throng ever to see a sporting event. At a time when the population was less than one quarter its current size, more than fifty thousand people watched him race, a crowd on par with today’s baseball games. Countless thousands paid just to watch his workouts, while thousands of others gathered at train stations to greet him and his elegant wife.

But his immense fame, achieved in what was one of the nation’s most popular sports, came against incredible odds. He was repeatedly kicked out of restaurants and hotels, forced to sleep in horse stables, and terrorized out of cities by threats of violence. On the more than one hundred bike tracks called velodromes, he endured incessant racism, including being shoved head-first into track rails. On a sultry New England day in 1897, a rival nearly choked him to death, a violent incident the New York Times called among the most talked-about in sport.

Along his turbulent path that began as a penniless horse-tender from bucolic Indiana, Taylor received help from the most unlikely of men, all of whom happened to be white. When hotel and restaurant operators refused him food and lodging, forcing him to race hungry, a benevolent racer-turned-trainer named Birdie Munger took Taylor under his wing and into his home. One of Taylor’s managers was famed Broadway producer William Brady, a feisty Irishman who had brawled with Virgil Earp in cow-town boxing rings. He stood up for Taylor when track owners tried to bar him from competing. While winning more than one thousand bike races himself, Arthur Zimmerman, America’s first superstar, mentored Taylor even though others called him a useless little “pickanninny.” In the mid-1890s during a devastating depression, the extraordinary kindness these men bestowed helped elevate Taylor from rags to riches.

But for Taylor and his helpers, it was merely the start of a fourteen-year journey filled with suffering and jubilation. From 1896 to 1910, Taylor emerged as one of history’s most remarkable sportsman. Endowed with blazing speed and indomitable bravery, he traveled more than two hundred thousand grueling miles by rail and ship, started two-mile handicap races as far back as three hundred yards, and set numerous world speed records. His danger-filled struggle for equality on American tracks eventually drove him overseas where he became the most heavily advertised man in Europe, was talked about as often as presidents of countries, and captured more attention than some of the world’s wealthiest citizens. His dramatic match races with French Triple Crown winner Edmond Jacquelin, which attracted barons, dukes, and paupers from nearly every nation in Europe, were widely remembered a quarter-century later. And in 1907 after a fall instigated by an envious rival—a severe injury that led to a mental breakdown—the much-maligned black man attempted a comeback many thought impossible.*

But it wasn’t just athletic greatness that attracted people to him. Carrying the Scriptures with him always, this deeply religious man turned down enormous sums of money because he refused to race on Sunday. Thousands were captivated by his eloquent, peaceful delivery of messages about faith and kindness, and his mystical capacity to forgive those who persecuted him.*

During his ride from anonymity to superstardom, the gentle black man and the few white men who helped him starred in an epic story for the ages.

It began with two boys on bicycles, riding free.

I have to get my eyes on the book one of the authors mentioned that at the completion of this book there was another book that was written about Major, that was being considered being made into a movie. Terry and Conrad had approached the producer about considering their book, but the was told no that he couldn't read thr book since it was a contract signed for production of the other Major Taylor book

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170706/799f61fcc09d16c674633c051279de1e.jpg

Sent from my LG-H811 using Tapatalk

monarchguy
07-06-2017, 08:53 PM
Still trying to get thru ours! Just never get the chance to read it.

73 Degrees. The Worlds Finest Bicycle Builders

And yep, I guess thats a shameless plug! lol

Agree, a good read. Good enough to ask when you're coming out with Volume 2?

-- Dan