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chiasticon
03-10-2017, 03:23 PM
my definition of a perfect multitool is "everything you need, nothing you don't."

the list of what I (currently) deem necessary in order to service the most likely field-repair parts of all of my bikes is: 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, T25, phillips.

previously, I thought the Lezyne SV5 was perfect for me. it has 3, 4, 5, 6, phillips. but then Sram started doing 2.5 for the limit screws on their FD's, so I added a spare 2.5 to my tool kit with the SV5. then I started using the Zipp stems which use T25. so clearly I need to re-assess my multitool at this point...

I realize I won't really get the "everything you need, nothing you don't" I'm looking for, unless I go to ratchets and spare bits. and I'm OK with an extra bit or two in the multitool. but I'm not going to carry a 19 piece multi just to get the 2.5 and T25. the closest I have in my posession is the Park IB-2. but it has a couple extra bits and a flathead instead of a Phillips (which will work for limit screws I wanted the phillips for, but is not ideal). still, it's close.

so what about you? what do you carry and what's the perfect multitool for you?

William
03-10-2017, 03:35 PM
:)



William

echelon_john
03-10-2017, 03:59 PM
Park IB-3. I like having a chain tool. Because I am very large and powerful. 1/2 of that last sentence is true.

Clancy
03-10-2017, 04:06 PM
Fix-it Sticks. I've not found anything as light, compact, or as easy to use. I bought two different models, and now carry 3 of the sticks so that I get the T25 and 2.5.

I just saw some nice mini tools from Fabric. The six tool version is super cool, light, well made, but alas no 2.5

mktng
03-10-2017, 04:11 PM
http://www.lezyne.com/product-mtools-crvtools.php#.WMMjyhLyui4

I use this. I've probably used every tool on this thing at least once. Some obviously more than others. Yes..even that serrated knife!. Chain breaker tool is awesome too. It fits nicely into my tool roll along with tire, lever and some zip ties.

Cicli
03-10-2017, 04:23 PM
I have disassembled several that I picked up along the way. Reassembled with what I need. They work fine.

ultraman6970
03-10-2017, 04:27 PM
I like this one!

:)



William

echelon_john
03-10-2017, 04:30 PM
No air compressor, so not tubeless compatible. Deal breaker.

I have disassembled several that I picked up along the way. Reassembled with what I need. They work fine.

m_sasso
03-10-2017, 04:40 PM
The tool quality is good and has what I need,
Crank Brothers M17 includes:
chain tool: 8/9/10 speed compatible
spoke wrench: #0, 1, 2, 3
hex wrenches: #2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8
open wrench: 8mm, 10mm
screwdrivers: phillips #2, flat #2, torx: t-25
length 89 mm
weight 168g
warranty lifetime
https://www.crankbrothers.com/data/media/products/products_large/m17_magenta_black.png

Louis
03-10-2017, 04:48 PM
I've always liked the CPR-9, but I don't think they're made anymore.

http://www.bikepro.com/products/chains/chains_jpg/y_cpr_9.jpg

yummygooey
03-10-2017, 04:52 PM
I came here to suggest the Crank Brothers M17 (or 19) (above). I like mine a lot!

MaraudingWalrus
03-10-2017, 04:55 PM
I like the Fabric chamber tool, in both its ratchet and non-ratchet variety. Fabric has a few other tools besides that that are relatively nice, also.

tumbler
03-10-2017, 05:42 PM
I came here to suggest the Crank Brothers M17 (or 19) (above). I like mine a lot!

+1. I ordered my M19 from Nashbar for $16.96 on June 20, 2007... so coming up on 10 years. I occasionally think about checking out what's new, but I really have zero complaints with my M19.

vqdriver
03-10-2017, 05:44 PM
I've always liked the CPR-9, but I don't think they're made anymore.

http://www.bikepro.com/products/chains/chains_jpg/y_cpr_9.jpg

i had 2 of those. worst tool ever. had exactly what i needed, only half of which i could get into places where they needed to be.

Louis
03-10-2017, 05:51 PM
only half of which i could get into places where they needed to be.

This is always a risk for "all in one" tools, but IMO it's worth living with, given the alternatives (nothing at all or carrying half a toolbox).

ctcyclistbob
03-10-2017, 06:10 PM
Just saw this today, kinda cool:
https://www.blackburndesign.com/tools/switch-multi-tool.html

dustyrider
03-10-2017, 07:37 PM
I have never found a single multi tool to be as good as several tools.
So on the road I carry:
2 pedro's tire levers
Pedro's folding hex with a torx/flat
Park tool ct-6.(?) chain break
Park tool patch kit
Correct size tube
Cash

cachagua
03-11-2017, 12:43 AM
The other side of the equation is, work your bike over to reduce the number of tools needed to fix it. For example, screws with torx or phillips heads can be replaced with allens.

Of course, this doesn't do you a bit of good when someone else's bike breaks down... particularly if it's an attractive someone else. And -- admit it! --isn't that the real reason we carry tools? Our bikes never break down!

But all seriousness aside, there's no need to have nineteen different ways of turning a screw on your bike. Support your local hardware store.

simonov
03-11-2017, 04:20 AM
These are pretty nifty and with replaceable bits you could swap the flathead or 2mm hex with something else you want. But it comes with a 2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5 (the wrench), 6, flat head, philips and T25, so everything the OP wants plus some extras. The tire levers are a bit flimsy, but could probably help in a pinch.

http://toolguyd.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/PB-Swiss-BikeTool-a-Compact-Bike-Tool-Kit.jpg

weisan
03-11-2017, 04:43 AM
The only tool that I personally like to always carry as a dedicated tool is this one, the rest is negotiable/optional/whatever is fine.

http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1417/5893256770_4ec226f317_o.jpg

macaroon
03-11-2017, 05:10 AM
Another Crank Brothers M17 fan. Has everything you need and nothing you don't.

oldpotatoe
03-11-2017, 05:15 AM
Ok, I'm gonna say it, be 'that guy'..The 'perfect' multi tool is decent maintenance on yer bike.
I don't carry any tools except for a little metal lever to pry my tubular off if I get a puncture. That's wrapped up in my tubular, all in a sock, under the saddle. Frame pump. In 35 years of riding, I've needed a took once, my SP cleat came loose. Chain tool? Road riding..never broke a chain.

YMMV and all that. :p

JStonebarger
03-11-2017, 06:34 AM
Ok, I'm gonna say it, be 'that guy'..The 'perfect' multi tool is decent maintenance on yer bike.

Absolutely true. And the reason I take a multi-tool.

+1 on the M17. We have as many of those around the house as we do reading glasses.

R3awak3n
03-11-2017, 07:14 AM
I like the fix it sticks. I can carry only the bits I want and there is nice leverage unline traditional multi tools, it is also small and compact. Carry a pedro tire lever as well. No chain tool because I use quicklink and always carry a spare quicklink.

ElHardeen
03-11-2017, 07:53 AM
Also a big fan of the new fix-it-sticks with replaceable bits.

The sticks themselves provide plenty of leverage when needed, and can reach into brake lever/shifters bolts which most multi-tools can't. Plus the ability to use any standard 1/4" socket is quite nice. Have gotten ahold of a 10mm to work on my rack bolts.

Adding the Park CT-5 mini chain tool makes for a quite capable portable tool kit.

R3awak3n
03-11-2017, 07:56 AM
Yeah I added a T20 bit to my kit for the ritchey stem. Really. Ice and good price.

AngryScientist
03-11-2017, 08:10 AM
. No chain tool because I use quicklink and always carry a spare quicklink.

haha, you may want to rethink that.

if you break a chain on the road, you're likely to end up with one of the pictures below:

https://cdn.instructables.com/F27/464Z/GNNUW158/F27464ZGNNUW158.MEDIUM.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6013/5933019605_5bf3cc3168_m.jpg

in either case, you've still got to push the pin out of the other side to be able to use your quick link. carrying just the link may make you feel better, but in reality it would almost certainly be useless without a chain tool to prep the chain to accept it. remember a quick link must join two narrow links.

anyway, i rarely carry a chain tool either, as i change chains pretty often and consider them pretty reliable.

i think tools that have small removable bits are not a good idea for the road myself. after loosing a small bit in the mud one day and spending too many minutes looking for it, i've given up on them.

just a small tool for the road with a basic 4,5,6 and phillips are all i ever really need. i really like the shimano PRO tool, slim and well made.

the one tool that i almost always carry is a spoke key. i've definitely re-trued a wheel into rideable shape after whacking a pothole. done it more than a few times for riding pals too.

http://www.2wheelsonly.co.uk/ekmps/shops/2wheelsonly1000/images/park-tool-spoke-key-black-0.127-11495-p.jpg

now touring, or extended trips - that's a different story.

dustyrider
03-11-2017, 08:19 AM
Ok, I'm gonna say it, be 'that guy'..The 'perfect' multi tool is decent maintenance on yer bike.
I don't carry any tools except for a little metal lever to pry my tubular off if I get a puncture. That's wrapped up in my tubular, all in a sock, under the saddle. Frame pump. In 35 years of riding, I've needed a took once, my SP cleat came loose. Chain tool? Road riding..never broke a chain.

YMMV and all that. :p

I'm right there with you, but my Boy Scout days have ingrained the Be Prepared motto into all I do. When I ride my bike it gives me a sense of complete independence. I don't want to rely on anyone while I'm spinning that crank. :cool:

In the end, I use my tools on other people's bikes way more than my own. Most common are the tire levers, tube patches, folded up dollar bill for a tire boot. I don't think of a pump as a tool. Where I live, goat heads make a pump par for the course. Unless you like walking... :confused:

I like a chain break tool because I've gotten way out there before and broken a chain. Only once on the road, several times off road. The thing is we don't all live in urban settings! 30 miles from my house is a vast barren desert. I also don't have to carry an entire tire on the back of my seat, just a tube, so there's that. :)

OtayBW
03-11-2017, 08:31 AM
I'm right there with you, but my Boy Scout days have ingrained the Be Prepared motto into all I do. When I ride my bike it gives me a sense of complete independence. I don't want to rely on anyone while I'm spinning that crank. :cool:

In the end, I use my tools on other people's bikes way more than my own. Most common are the tire levers, tube patches, folded up dollar bill for a tire boot. I don't think of a pump as a tool.
Agreed on both counts. I carry a small Topeak multitool, but I can't remember the last time I needed it for me. I have used it more than once for others with mechanical problems.

Black Dog
03-11-2017, 08:39 AM
I have one of these in the saddle bag of all my bikes. Has everything you might need. Add a quick link for a chain and you can cover a lot of on road repairs. But to be honest, in 30 years of ridding I have only needed a tool for myself once or twice. Now, using it on other's bikes is a very different story.

The tool quality is good and has what I need,
Crank Brothers M17 includes:
chain tool: 8/9/10 speed compatible
spoke wrench: #0, 1, 2, 3
hex wrenches: #2, 2.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8
open wrench: 8mm, 10mm
screwdrivers: phillips #2, flat #2, torx: t-25
length 89 mm
weight 168g
warranty lifetime
https://www.crankbrothers.com/data/media/products/products_large/m17_magenta_black.png

charliedid
03-11-2017, 09:23 AM
Peter makes a compelling argument up to a point. That said for me the best multi tool is the one you remembered to bring with.

Cicli
03-11-2017, 09:28 AM
Peter makes a compelling argument up to a point. That said for me the best multi tool is the one you remembered to bring with.

Agreed,
The only real breakdowns I have had were not fixable with a multitool and no parts. Cable, broken seat binder bolt and a pedal that came apart. I had a multitool and some patches, pump ect. Where do you draw the line? I am not carrying an inventory of spares.

Bob Ross
03-11-2017, 09:33 AM
https://www.crankbrothers.com/data/media/products/products_large/m17_magenta_black.png

I have one of those. My beef with that one (and other similarly-shaped multitools) is that the length of the individual tools is disproportionately short compared to the width of the entire assembly, and that means that in certain situations you can't get a full 360° rotation without the body of the tool banging into whatever is next to the screw/bolt you're turning.

My favorite was an old Topeak that sadly is no longer made. Had 5 or 6 different sized hex wrenches, a Phillips and a flathead screwdriver, was long, narrow, and light. Otoh, no chainbreaker, and I'm amazed at how often I've rescued someone on a group ride by being That Guy who has one handy.

Tickdoc
03-11-2017, 09:39 AM
It's really the only tool I carry. I personally haven't had to use it yet, but friends have and there is an "omygosh this is cool" response from them every time.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v234/Handgod/594895BC-8B4F-44C1-86A9-49B7C6FD80AA_zpsaavxcvx5.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v234/Handgod/35B6F8A1-2145-4F76-A1EF-C5E0316F84DF_zpsa7ojhv6y.jpg

Who recommended this to me? Weisan was it you? I found it here as a kickstarter project. Thanks whoever you are.

If I needed a chain breaker, the leyzene Carbon would be my choice, but I am never so far away that I can't call for rescue.

ceolwulf
03-11-2017, 10:30 AM
They're big and heavy, but for long rides or for heading into the hills on forgotten gravel roads I really like the Crank Brothers Y series. If you can't fix your bike with this you probably will need the services of a full shop.

Also as mentioned choice of spare parts to carry is important.

https://www.crankbrothers.com/data/media/products/products_large/y16.png

gdw
03-11-2017, 10:32 AM
I've tried quite a few multitools over the years and not been impressed so I standardized the bolts on my bikes and just carry 4,5,6mm Allen keys, a Park chain tool, and small spoke wrench. A friend recently brought by an Industry Nine MatchStick multitool/axle and that has to be the slickest emergency tool on the market for folks who use thru-axle hubs and aren't in a hurry to repair their bike.

NHAero
03-11-2017, 10:38 AM
The Mini 9 has two "extra" tools with the 2mm and 8mm and is small and weighs in at 92g. You could pull the slip-on 8mm hex off the 6mm and then have only one extra size!

I have a few Sette 7 multitools which I think I got from Pricepoint for very little $ - not as nice, 9g more than the Topeak but a bit more user friendly in the hand - same exact tool options as the Mini 9

I sometimes use the multitool to adjust seat height or angle. Last weekend was the first time I used on for a repair on the road in years. My old Klein Pulse II MTB is the one with the big studded tires and I was riding home through the woods after dropping a car off at the Park-and-Ride for my wife and it started to make a not-good noise. The bolt for the lower RD pulley had loosened but thankfully not fallen out yet. Nice to have the tool to put it back properly. I stipulate to Peter's observation about maintenance - this bike gets little use except when I treat it badly (took it to work yesterday in the snow storm we had, for example) and I need to go over it for other potential fixes that might be required.

simplemind
03-11-2017, 11:45 AM
It's really the only tool I carry.
Who recommended this to me? Weisan was it you? I found it here as a kickstarter project. Thanks whoever you are.

If I needed a chain breaker, the leyzene Carbon would be my choice, but I am never so far away that I can't call for rescue.

Very cool tool, here (https://telehex.myshopify.com) is the website.

joosttx
03-11-2017, 12:32 PM
https://c1.staticflickr.com/8/7117/27378490475_eee7669fd2_c.jpg

very happy with this one.

thirdgenbird
03-11-2017, 01:44 PM
That last one looks great.

John H.
03-11-2017, 03:23 PM
The perfect multi tool is the one that you never have to use.

joosttx
03-11-2017, 03:43 PM
The perfect multi tool is the one that you never have to use.

Or have

shovelhd
03-11-2017, 04:20 PM
The perfect multi tool is the one that you never have to use.

Unless you're traveling with your bike, where it's pretty critical.

R3awak3n
03-11-2017, 04:48 PM
haha, you may want to rethink that.

if you break a chain on the road, you're likely to end up with one of the pictures below:

https://cdn.instructables.com/F27/464Z/GNNUW158/F27464ZGNNUW158.MEDIUM.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6013/5933019605_5bf3cc3168_m.jpg

in either case, you've still got to push the pin out of the other side to be able to use your quick link. carrying just the link may make you feel better, but in reality it would almost certainly be useless without a chain tool to prep the chain to accept it. remember a quick link must join two narrow links.

anyway, i rarely carry a chain tool either, as i change chains pretty often and consider them pretty reliable.

i think tools that have small removable bits are not a good idea for the road myself. after loosing a small bit in the mud one day and spending too many minutes looking for it, i've given up on them.

just a small tool for the road with a basic 4,5,6 and phillips are all i ever really need. i really like the shimano PRO tool, slim and well made.

the one tool that i almost always carry is a spoke key. i've definitely re-trued a wheel into rideable shape after whacking a pothole. done it more than a few times for riding pals too.

http://www.2wheelsonly.co.uk/ekmps/shops/2wheelsonly1000/images/park-tool-spoke-key-black-0.127-11495-p.jpg

now touring, or extended trips - that's a different story.

that has never happen to me but I definitely have broken a quick link and at the time did not have an extra one. But yeah if the chain brakes that bad, I guess I will have to call the wife.

chiasticon
03-11-2017, 05:44 PM
The Mini 9 has two "extra" tools with the 2mm and 8mm and is small and weighs in at 92g. You could pull the slip-on 8mm hex off the 6mm and then have only one extra size!thanks for the recommendation. I actually just happened upon that one today, by chance. I would pull the 8 off, yeah; I don't plan on swapping pedals or crank arms out on the road. they actually have a mini 9 "pro" version that ditches the 6 and 8mm, and adds a fold-out tire lever. pretty slick. I'm trying to remember what I need a 6mm for on my bikes now...

as far as the idea of not carrying a multitool... yeah I agree that you should have your bike ready to ride and up to date on maintenance, to the point that nothing on it should require attention out on the road. but unfortunately, it's an imperfect world. sometimes random crap happens that being up to date on maintenance can't fight. then you need assistance. they weigh next to nothing. so if you need it and aren't carrying it, you'll be cursing your stupidity and calling the SAG wagon.

chain-breaker: I don't carry one unless I'm off-road. there it's more like that some crap will jump into your rear derailleur and kill it or the chain. then you need one or your screwed.

dk2ck
03-11-2017, 06:28 PM
+1 for the M17. I've had mine for 3 or 4 years now and have been really happy with it.

djdj
03-11-2017, 06:40 PM
iPhone. :beer:

EPIC! Stratton
03-11-2017, 07:20 PM
http://www.wigglestatic.com/product-media/5360050499/Topeak-Hexus-II-16-Function-Multi-Tool-Tools-Multi-Tools-Black-TT2538.jpg?w=430&h=430&a=7

Topeak Hexus II.

Has it all ATMO.

Pastashop
03-11-2017, 09:39 PM
Another Topeak... 15+ years of service, so I lost a couple of little bits from the original, but it still works:

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170312/06e666f3e31e2101f005c4363793053b.jpg

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170312/80dc472ae13839bd30758c40d0178d7e.jpg

jasnooks
03-11-2017, 09:53 PM
+ whatever we're at for the m19.
I've only had mine for about 2 years, but I've used the hell out of it, with no signs of wear yet.
I carry that, a 6"adjustable wrench, pressure gauge, pump, levers, and a patch kit. Never been stranded since.
The only "complaint" I have about the m19 is how short the hex keys are, but that's to be expected with a compact multi tool.

YesNdeed
03-12-2017, 07:48 PM
This thread has put me back in touch with how irresponsible it is to not carry any type of multi tool, fortunately without getting stranded (again). I managed to bypass my OCD nature when it comes to bike stuff (Lezyne alone has quite the multi tool catalog), and ordered up an M19 since they seem to be well recommended. Thanks to all for contributing.
:beer:

choke
03-12-2017, 08:08 PM
Since this has evolved more into a 'what's your favorite multi-tool'....

I still carry a 25 year old "Cool Tool". The adjustable wrench has come in handy more times than you might think as a lot of vintage components use hex head fasteners instead of allens.

http://cycle.ciocctoo.com/ctool.jpg

metalheart
08-29-2017, 08:46 PM
I had to use my multi tool today for the first time in quite a while. It is a Blackburn tool, maybe an antique, anyway, it was rusted shut. I got it to work, but it is time for something new. Reading previous posts, here are the ones that appeal to me:

(1) the Swiss Tools set looks like it packs well and has a full range of bits.
(2) Fix it sticks : good bit options, compact, known quality
(2) TeleHex --- nice idea, but I can't tell from the web site if what you are getting is just the bit holder or a set of bits too?
(4) Not mentioned --- I don't think -- is the Fabric Chamber tool (http://fabric.cc/tools/chamber/)that also looks compact and has a lot of bits....

Any updates from users of the above tools or anything I am missing?

Cat3roadracer
08-29-2017, 09:18 PM
They're big and heavy, but for long rides or for heading into the hills on forgotten gravel roads I really like the Crank Brothers Y series. If you can't fix your bike with this you probably will need the services of a full shop.

Also as mentioned choice of spare parts to carry is important.

https://www.crankbrothers.com/data/media/products/products_large/y16.png

Love this one. And so does the guy I helped in Deerfield with the broken chain.