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View Full Version : Who travels with their bike?


Jcgill
03-06-2017, 10:34 PM
I am looking to pick up an orucase this summer so i can take my bike on vacation with me and avoid renting at my destination as i have always done.
(Hopefully the orucase will pay for itself by skirting airline fees and avoiding rental costs)

Just curious for those that travel with their bikes what do you take with as far as basic tools for assembling and tuning?! I would like to pack light but still be prepared.

More specifically what do you guys do for a pump at your destination? I am in the habit of using my floor pump daily to tune my tire pressue before every ride...do you take a full floor pump along? Or is there a mini and or guage setup that you use?


Thanks,
Jon

572cv
03-06-2017, 11:07 PM
First, don't wait to order an Orucase, as interest in the product is growing, and they are i) figuring out how to gear up, and ii) dealing with one of the principals having broken his leg in a few places. Its a small operation, still, with a very good product.

Second, I always bring my bike (if I'm going to bike!). I've refined this over the years, and it depends on how you pack your bike and how much it has to be taken apart. The Silca socket set with torque is pretty complete. I bring that, and a larger socket for my time pedals. I bring a lezyne mini floor pump with a gauge. I bring a 5mm socket deep enough to remount the RD, which has to come off in my packing set up. I bring a compact tool set to carry on rides, a spare tube or two, some grease, some lube of choice, a few pairs of latex gloves or finish line light work gloves, a spoke wrench and that's it. You have to assess your own situation clearly. For instance, if you have to remove the chain, bring some links and a chain tool. If you have to remove brake cables, a third hand tool can be really 'handy'. ;)

carpediemracing
03-07-2017, 07:09 AM
I the tools necessary to reassemble my bike, both in a saddle bag in the bike case (mini tools including an 8mm Allen) as well as the full size tools (check in bag). I bring both a portable pump as well as a floor pump, both in the bike bag.

I usually have a source for tools at the destination but one year they forgot to leave a key. I put my bike together in their back yard using my saddle bag tools and rode until they got home. This prompted me to carry more tools on a check-in bag. I even bring BB30/crankset tools, just in case.

Floor pump I tape to the soft sided case frame.

I bring two helmets, some spares like tubes, tires, tape, etc. I can install that stuff quickly if necessary.

I only show one pair of wheels in my link but I've since started bringing two sets of wheels. That seems to be more secure overall, the stuff inside the case doesn't move. I'm short enough that my ISP frame also fits once I remove the stub post/saddle.

http://sprinterdellacasa.blogspot.com/2009/02/how-to-packing-bike-soft-case.html

I haven't traveled since 2011 but we're thinking of doing a trip in August.

carpediemracing
03-07-2017, 07:14 AM
I think the hot ticket are the S&S couplings. If I were to travel more than 1-3x a year, which is what I did for about 7 years, I'd get a S&S bike, maybe Ti to reduce weight and increase durability, with (the coolest thing) an S&S stem. I think that would save some hassle.

Zinn's bike
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-OIrCYr_OP7k/Tm7usGu8reI/AAAAAAAADlQ/ltsbZ6pVpmE/s800/2011-09-12_09-46-36_987.jpg

OtayBW
03-07-2017, 07:17 AM
I think the hot ticket are the S&S couplings. If I were to travel more than 1-3x a year, which is what I did for about 7 years, I'd get a S&S bike, maybe Ti to reduce weight and increase durability, with (the coolest thing) an S&S stem. I think that would save some hassle.

Zinn's bike
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-OIrCYr_OP7k/Tm7usGu8reI/AAAAAAAADlQ/ltsbZ6pVpmE/s800/2011-09-12_09-46-36_987.jpg
Is that Al foil HVAC tape on your bars? Looks....er....shiny! :eek: ;) :help:

chiasticon
03-07-2017, 08:23 AM
I haven't flown with my bike yet so I won't comment on that. but I almost always take it on vacations and nine times out of ten, I'm tearing it down almost as much as you would to fly with it, because I prefer travelling with it in the car versus outside. and usually car space is at a premium when going away for a week or so...

anyway, I pack my usual riding tools as well as a small bag with a few extras: grease, rags, chain lube, 8mm hex, etc. things that aren't in the riding tools that I'll need to re-assemble the bike, basically. maybe a couple extras, just in case. but mainly, make sure your bike is in tip-top shape before leaving, so you don't have to bring stuff just in case you need to re-cable it mid-vacation or some nonsense like that.

pump-wise, I just bring the frame pump I'd be using to ride with anyway. then bring a digital gauge to check pressure before rides. it's not perfect but it's a lot smaller than a floor pump.

.RJ
03-07-2017, 08:34 AM
I have a small soft-sided bag (maybe 6x5x3") that goes in the bike cases that has tools (I really like using t-handles at home, but l-wrenches are best for this), torque key, 3-way, chain lube, disposable rubber gloves (packing up a dirty bike sucks), a small rag, zip ties, an extra set of cables & cutters, tubes, tire patches, and a mini-pump. Mark your seatpost, bars and any cables you disconnect before disassembly to make reassembly easier. I like to zip tie the chain together at the crank & rd so it cant tangle in the case as things shift in transit.

sandyrs
03-07-2017, 09:48 AM
I fly with an S&S road bike a couple times a year usually. Since it's coupled, I can't really speak to anything except the inflation question you posed. I think that the way to go here would be the Lezyne Micro Floor Drive or something similar- a miniature pump that functions like a floor pump, not a pocket pump, and has a pressure gauge.

https://www.backcountry.com/lezyne-micro-floor-drive-high-pressure-pump

I just use my mini pump and it's annoying. If I traveled more I'd probably shell out for one of these lil guys.

The other option is to use your pocket pump and buy the SKS pressure gauge to make sure you have the pressure where you want it.
https://www.rei.com/product/821357/sks-airchecker-digital-pressure-gauge

old fat man
03-07-2017, 11:25 AM
I travel with a Ritchey Breakaway once a year usually. I bring the Topeak Road Morph: https://www.topeak.com/global/en/products/mini-pumps/246-road-morph--g

I have access to tools at my destination but I always bring my Pedros multi tool with full selection of allen wrenches, chain tool, spoke wrench, and screwdrivers.

I use a quick link on the chain (Connex 10 speed for Campy 10) to avoid need for chain pins.

The only extra items I bring are extra tubes, an extra tire (tend to ride rough gravel where I travel), and an extra c-clamp for the Ritchey downtube since that's proprietary. Everything else I could get in 2 days from Amazon or from the LBS most likely.

93legendti
03-07-2017, 12:34 PM
I do. I have 2 Bike Friday Pocket Rockets. One is a PR Pro with a ti seat mast. The other is a PR with a folding seat mast.

I have a travel Blackburn pump with a gauge and fold out "foot pads". I take a park multi tool.

zennmotion
03-07-2017, 02:01 PM
I travel with a Ritchey Breakaway once a year usually. I bring the Topeak Road Morph: https://www.topeak.com/global/en/products/mini-pumps/246-road-morph--g

I have access to tools at my destination but I always bring my Pedros multi tool with full selection of allen wrenches, chain tool, spoke wrench, and screwdrivers.

I use a quick link on the chain (Connex 10 speed for Campy 10) to avoid need for chain pins.

The only extra items I bring are extra tubes, an extra tire (tend to ride rough gravel where I travel), and an extra c-clamp for the Ritchey downtube since that's proprietary. Everything else I could get in 2 days from Amazon or from the LBS most likely.

Plus a little ziplock bag with pre-cut cables, extra Ritchey frame connector, spare cleat and cleat screws, replacement shoe buckle, spare M4/5 screws, extra chain quick link, Stein mini cassette tool, you never need them until you do. My breakaway cross is awesome.

biker72
03-07-2017, 02:42 PM
I drive to my cycling destination carrying my Specialized Diverge inside the vehicle.
Take off the front wheel and I'm good to go.
I take my full sized floor pump and a small bag of tools/chain lube...etc just in case.

I've got plenty of room left over for luggage in the Honda Accord or Fit.
It's a whole different ball game if you have kids travelling with you..:D

CaptStash
03-07-2017, 03:00 PM
I fly a lot with my bike (10-20 trips per year), and early on discovered that my Pedros (cheap and sleazy but it works) floor pump fit in the S&S case. It's invaluable for getting the bike together and pumping up before each ride.

I don't carry a lot of tools, but do have a nice set of allen wrenches for assembly disassembly, and a way too big and invloved mini-tool that goes in the seat bag. It has a chain breaker and every other thing you can imagine, with the idea that I don't want to get stranded. I also carry two spare tubes and a patch kit, along with the usual tire levers. You're still not supposed to fly with CO2 cartridges, so I don't. Finally I have a small Lezyne pump I carry in my back pocket for flat repairs. Works fine.

I also prefer to remove my chain, so I use a Whipperman chain with the removable link. Works fine and hasn't failed me in thousands of miles. It is useful though to learn the right and wrong way to install the Whipperman link (it has a top and a bottom sort of).

CaptStash....

AngryScientist
03-07-2017, 03:35 PM
i've only flown with my own bike once, but am just now putting together all the necessities of bike travel.

i'm getting on a plane to LA on monday morning with my new-to-me S&S case, so we'll see how it all goes.

i'm just planning on using my frame pump to air up the tires and top them off at the first bike shop i pass by

S&S bikes are always a conversation starter and the i've never encountered a LBS that wont let you use their shop pump.

i'm also currently planning for minimal tools. small multi tool with 4,5,6 allen, a loose 8mm allen for the pedals and of course the S&S wrench for the couplers themselves. i also throw a leatherman in my bag which can cut bike cables and tie wraps. i cant really think of anything else i'll need.

weisan
03-07-2017, 04:05 PM
i've only flown with my own bike once, but am just now putting together all the necessities of bike travel.

i'm getting on a plane to LA on monday morning with my new-to-me S&S case, so we'll see how it all goes.

i'm just planning on using my frame pump to air up the tires and top them off at the first bike shop i pass by

S&S bikes are always a conversation starter and the i've never encountered a LBS that wont let you use their shop pump.

i'm also currently planning for minimal tools. small multi tool with 4,5,6 allen, a loose 8mm allen for the pedals and of course the S&S wrench for the couplers themselves. i also throw a leatherman in my bag which can cut bike cables and tie wraps. i cant really think of anything else i'll need.

Angry pal, sounds like you are in for an adventure!

I would add a mini chain tool and maybe a couple of velcro straps.

rccardr
03-07-2017, 04:41 PM
I travel and ride my bike when I get there. A lot. Usually ship the bike ahead in an EVOC bag. It's cheaper, never had a problem with damage, and I don't have to haul it thru the airport or in a cab. Bag goes under the bed or in a closet.

Regular floor pump fits in my roller bag, I pack my usual saddle bag (tubes, levers, whatever I usually ride with at home) and take whatever tools I used to dismantle the bike in The Lab...maybe four allen wrenches, a small open end, plus flat and phillips head screwdrivers, regular and needle nose pliers. And a spare shift and brake cable, neither of which have ever been used.

godfrey1112000
03-07-2017, 04:55 PM
Right next to the wine

NeauDL
03-07-2017, 07:04 PM
I've made more than twenty round trips by air with my S&S Calfee. Whatever tools I use to disassemble and pack the bike go into the hard case. These include a variety of Allen wrenches, a small torque wrench, S&S wrench, masterlink pliers, small screwdriver for the computer, chain whip, crescent wrench, cassette lockring tool, knife, duct tape, zip ties, and Ziploc bags for small parts, small bottle of lube, etc. I also take a spare of each size spoke and take spare cables. I prefer to pack and ship the bike UPS rather than count on it making it onto my flights. For a group ride, someone will have a floor pump you can use. And for Texas Hellweek (this Saturday!), I take a grapefruit spoon. Rio Stars do taste better in Texas.

mistermo
03-07-2017, 07:26 PM
I posted this info in another thread a couple weeks ago, but it seems relevant here too. Before getting a Ritchey Breakaway, I used a Ruster Hen House. It worked great, but required two bags and lots of assembly/disassembly compared to an eTap Breakaway. I figured out that the easier it is to pack/unpack, the more likely I'll take the bike with me and use it. A few things I've learned and liked:

I have the previously mentioned Lezyne travel pump. Bontrager has a similar pump that was recently on sale for about 50% the price of the Lezyne. Both work great.

The Ritchey Phantom flange hubs are fantastic if you have to pack your wheels in a tight bag. Cassette pops right out. Available on multiple, newer wheels that Ritchey offers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4OIJJgjW-g

Other things Ive found that help make a travel bike easier to assemble/disassemble are these:

A stem with a two bolt faceplate (rather than 4), ala a Thomson X2.

http://www.pinkyeti.net/bikes/colnago_master_pista/images/L1000228.JPG

Fabric cageless bottles free up lots of usable space in the bag where cages get in the way:

http://cdn.hiconsumption.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Cageless-Water-Bottle-by-Fabric-0.jpg


SRAM eTap wireless is da bomb for obvious reasons. Only the rear brake cable must be disconnected. No derailleur cables to stretch, adjust and get wonky from assembly/disassembly. Also the eTap rear derailleur, can be easily removed and stored away to protect damage.

I have been trying to warm to MKS EZY quick release pedals. I'm not there yet, but their easy on and easy off feature is ideal for a travel bike. No tools required. They make several styles, including a road version, based on LOOK design

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdmJA4KHL3g

http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/QRUAAOSwv2JXwf8t/s-l500.jpg
Hope these tips help. I'll post a pic someday soon.

93legendti
03-07-2017, 07:48 PM
I posted this info in another thread a couple weeks ago, but it seems relevant here too. Before getting a Ritchey Breakaway, I used a Ruster Hen House. It worked great, but required two bags and lots of assembly/disassembly compared to an eTap Breakaway. I figured out that the easier it is to pack/unpack, the more likely I'll take the bike with me and use it. A few things I've learned and liked:

I have the previously mentioned Lezyne travel pump. Bontrager has a similar pump that was recently on sale for about 50% the price of the Lezyne. Both work great.

The Ritchey Phantom flange hubs are fantastic if you have to pack your wheels in a tight bag. Cassette pops right out. Available on multiple, newer wheels that Ritchey offers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4OIJJgjW-g

Other things Ive found that help make a travel bike easier to assemble/disassemble are these:

A stem with a two bolt faceplate (rather than 4), ala a Thomson X2.

http://www.pinkyeti.net/bikes/colnago_master_pista/images/L1000228.JPG

Fabric cageless bottles free up lots of usable space in the bag where cages get in the way:

http://cdn.hiconsumption.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Cageless-Water-Bottle-by-Fabric-0.jpg


SRAM eTap wireless is da bomb for obvious reasons. Only the rear brake cable must be disconnected. No derailleur cables to stretch, adjust and get wonky from assembly/disassembly. Also the eTap rear derailleur, can be easily removed and stored away to protect damage.

I have been trying to warm to MKS EZY quick release pedals. I'm not there yet, but their easy on and easy off feature is ideal for a travel bike. No tools required. They make several styles, including a road version, based on LOOK design

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FdmJA4KHL3g

http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/QRUAAOSwv2JXwf8t/s-l500.jpg
Hope these tips help. I'll post a pic someday soon.

Cool system for the bottles. I need to try those. Thanks for the tip.


Of course, Bike Friday uses pliable cages that work great, but space is space.

carpediemracing
03-07-2017, 08:53 PM
If traveling bring bike specific spares. Generally speaking you're at the destination for only a few riding days so you can't afford to be waiting for a part or for a shop to open.

Spare hanger for sure.

Also weirdness stuff, maybe aero post or stem bits that may get damaged in the dis/assembly process. I don't have anything like that but small game breakers for me include seat binder bolt, seat post bolts. Those snap and you can't fake it, and it's possible they snap.

I bring wheel truing wrenches, and for aero wheels, a socket screwdriver for my spoke nipples.

donalrey
03-08-2017, 08:54 AM
I always like to use my own bike when I'm traveling and I've done so a few times. Here are some of the things that I've learned.

- Whatever tools you use to take your bike apart is the same tools you'll need to put it back together. So bring them .

- Bring a couple of pair of tubes and patch kit. If you're running tubeless, even better.

- Contrary to popular belief you don't have to deflate your tire when traveling on a plane. I never do and never had any issues with it. If you do decide to deflate your tire, I usually just pump it up with a frame or a hand pump and just top it off at the nearest bike shop.

- Bike fees - this is a bit tricky. I always try to fly Jetblue or Virgin (within the US) as much as I can because at most they only charge you $50 each way. I've gotten away without paying bike fees by telling them it's photography equipment or something other than a bike. One airline personnel even suggested it was a massage table and I just agreed to it. Also, if the airline requires you to drop off your oversized luggage elsewhere - I usually just do a self check in and check in one item (usually around $25) and I just slap that tag on the bike case/bike bag. The person at the oversize luggage drop off never checks.

mistermo
03-08-2017, 10:00 AM
- Bring a couple of pair of tubes and patch kit. If you're running tubeless, even better.

- Contrary to popular belief you don't have to deflate your tire when traveling on a plane. I never do and never had any issues with it.

I guess this varies. I can't fit fully inflated tires in my Ritchey Breakaway case. I've considered tubeless, but concluded that with deflated tires, the potential for mess with leaked sealant wasn't worth the benefit.

Bob Ross
03-09-2017, 09:42 AM
Just curious for those that travel with their bikes what do you take with as far as basic tools for assembling and tuning?!

The missus and I have a pair of SandS coupled bikes that we travel with regularly. On every trip we bring:
- a pedal wrench
- a torque wrench
- a Park MLP-1 (master link pliars)
- a small pair of open ended box wrenches (for the cable couplers)
- the SandS coupler wrench
- the Shimano Di2 cable plugger-inner/outer thing
- a pair of needle-nose pliars for fishing the Di2 junction box out of the downtube

It sounds like a lot, but it all fits in one of those large ZipLoc bags.

More specifically what do you guys do for a pump at your destination?

We keep Topeak RoadMorphG pumps on both our bikes.

rousseau
03-09-2017, 02:28 PM
Question: Would some kind of packing case be more convenient and/or take up less space than just putting the bike in the trunk with the wheels removed?

I'm talking specifically about car trips of 5 to 10 hours, nothing plane related. I can just barely fit my bike in the trunk of my car with the wheels removed, but it does seem a bit ungainly. I also wonder if packing the bike in a case would be convenient when you arrive at the destination, in that you could pick it up like a suitcase and carry it into the hotel with you instead of having to remove the bike, put the wheels on, and wheel it in (or leave it in the trunk initially and come back later to retrieve it).

Would it be worth getting a case for those trips, or would there little to be gained?

Edit: I guess I'm also asking for a recommendation for the smallest bike case or bag out there.

nickrenfro
03-09-2017, 11:55 PM
I'm not sure if someone else has already said it or not, but I always opt to just ship it to myself to where ever I'm going. I head down to the bike shop, pick up a used bike box, and ship the bike pretty much built, sans front wheel, turning the bars into the frame, and lowering the seat post. Costs like $100 for fairly quick shipping in continental US and, depending on who you use, like $250 international. Just have to time it all out.