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bcroslin
11-08-2016, 01:29 PM
I have a carbon Santa Cruz highball with 10-spd XT group collecting dust in my garage and I would like to convert it to a drop bar gravel/ monster CX bike. The rear hub is 9/10 speed and not upgradeable to 11. Is there a 10 spd Shimano road group that can be mixed with XT and wet discs?

My mechanic buddy is encouraging me to swap out the XT group for a mix of SRAM Force and X1 components but I would then have to buy a new wheel set or at the very least a new rear hub and have the wheel rebuilt.

Does anyone have any advice for a cost efficient way to do this using pieces of the existing XT group?

cp43
11-08-2016, 01:41 PM
You can use 10 speed road shifters with a 9 speed MTB rear derailleur and shift over 10 cogs with Shimano. I don't know about availability of mechanical shifting, 10 speed, hydro brake levers. If you can find those, you can make it work.

edit: depending on how old your 10 speed MTB stuff is, you might be able to use your current rear derailleur. If it says "Dyna-Sys" on it, it won't work with road 10 speed shifters, if not, you're good to go with road shifters.

Chris

dem
11-08-2016, 02:03 PM
This isn't going to be cost effective. :) But I love Frankenbike challenges!

I would probably:
ST-RS685 11 speed shimano mechanical shifters/hydro brakes
Tanpan travel agent for the XT RD (assuming it works with your specific RD)
Shimano 11 speed 11-40 cassette (will fit 10 speed hubs, the 40 "dishes" over the spokes)

Go 1X up front for cheapest/simplest. Mountain bike frame and BB spacing will introduce some other challenges at that end if you want a double.

sandyrs
11-08-2016, 02:07 PM
You can use an 11 speed MTB cassette on that freehub. You could use the XT 11-40 11 speed cassette with a SRAM GX rear derailleur and Apex 1 shifters/brakes.

hollowgram5
11-08-2016, 02:11 PM
Both of the previous posters are correct. Your biggest challenge is whether you want Shimano or SRAM, and if you choose Shimano, what der to use. Both offer wet brakes.

Or you could do Gevenale and their TRP Hylex levers with their 1x set up for a Shimano rear der.

It all boils down to how much $$$ you wanna spend!

12snap
11-08-2016, 02:57 PM
You can also sell off your 10 spd XT group and mtn bike brakes to offset the costs of converting. I'm kind of looking for a 10 spd XT 11-36 cassette and M785 brakes if the price is right.

ColonelJLloyd
11-08-2016, 03:04 PM
If you haven't already look up rigs that were ridden on the Tour Divide races. Cool stuff.

bcroslin
11-08-2016, 03:44 PM
cp43: the RD is indeed Dynasys so no dice

dem: I'm thinking single up front would be the way to go but would love to use my XTR crankset if possible

sandyrs: interesting....

hollowgram5: so 6800 disc levers would work with the XT brakes?

12snap: I'll let you know if that happens

ColonelJLloyd: do you have a link? seems like if I could visualize how this would work it would help.

dougefresh
11-08-2016, 03:56 PM
which XTR crank do you have? WolfTooth likely has a ring for it. Using a MTB crank is going to limit how large a chainring you find.

But, yes, a Shimano 11s cassette, now available at the SLX level, with THIS (http://www.lindarets.com/tanpan/) linked between a Shimano r685 shifter/ brake set and a Shimano 11s derailleur will work just fine.

Also, you'll probably want a shorter stem. MTB top tubes are way longer than road bikes and don't account for drop bars with hoods extending out.

ColonelJLloyd
11-08-2016, 06:22 PM
ColonelJLloyd: do you have a link? seems like if I could visualize how this would work it would help.

I'll look up some links later. Most you'll see are customs, Salsa Cuttthroats or Fargos. The Salsa Fargo is probably the most revolutionary bicycle frame of the last decade.

What is your frame? What's the geometry? It probably has a high stack, which is good for gravel type riding generally speaking. Dougefresh is right that you'll likely want a super short stem and a probably short reach bars. I'd look to the flared offerings from, again, Salsa. They've done a lot to advance this genre. I would keep an eye out for a decent rigid carbon fork for sure.

And SRAM pioneered modern 1X. It's good stuff and a good bet. But, Shimano or a hodgepodge can work great too. Should be fun, man!

http://www.gravelcyclist.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/MonsterCX2.jpg

HenryA
11-08-2016, 06:43 PM
Not as much fun, but a lot cheaper:

Put some bar ends on it and ride. And a lower stem if you need. Probably not if the bike fits reasonably well now.

bcroslin
11-08-2016, 06:46 PM
I'll look up some links later. Most you'll see are customs, Salsa Cuttthroats or Fargos. The Salsa Fargo is probably the most revolutionary bicycle frame of the last decade.

What is your frame? What's the geometry? It probably has a high stack, which is good for gravel type riding generally speaking. Dougefresh is right that you'll likely want a super short stem and a probably short reach bars. I'd look to the flared offerings from, again, Salsa. They've done a lot to advance this genre. I would keep an eye out for a decent rigid carbon fork for sure.

And SRAM pioneered modern 1X. It's good stuff and a good bet. But, Shimano or a hodgepodge can work great too. Should be fun, man!

http://www.gravelcyclist.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/MonsterCX2.jpg

I found this link to a gallery of Tour Divide bikes: http://bikepacker.com/2016-tour-divide-rigs/

Lots of bikes that mix SRAM Force with X0

Frame is a SC Highball size large. Good point about the TT. I'm running a 100mm stem on it right this moment with flat bars. I was planning on picking up a used niner rigid fork.

bcroslin
11-08-2016, 06:52 PM
I also followed the image of Lynskey monster cross bike back to Jayson's site and found this:

http://www.gravelcyclist.com/bicycle-tech/featured-bike-lynskey-monster-cross-bike/

Answers a bunch of questions

jmal
11-08-2016, 06:55 PM
The easy solution is to use the flat bars and perhaps use bar ends for extra hand positions. I have ridden and raced many miles on this sort of setup, and for my area I really prefer the flat bar for gravel. Of course, we have steep mountains, so the rough descents are much more controlled with mtb bars. I also find mtb grips to be much better at absorbing vibration than bar tape on drops. Not as sexy as having a purpose built gravel rig, but every bit as functional.

bcroslin
11-08-2016, 07:15 PM
The easy solution is to use the flat bars and perhaps use bar ends for extra hand positions. I have ridden and raced many miles on this sort of setup, and for my area I really prefer the flat bar for gravel. Of course, we have steep mountains, so the rough descents are much more controlled with mtb bars. I also find mtb grips to be much better at absorbing vibration than bar tape on drops. Not as sexy as having a purpose built gravel rig, but every bit as functional.

That's no fun. Drop bars or bust.

bcroslin
11-08-2016, 07:32 PM
More answers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3Xgh5C-hH8&ab_channel=FabianF

Pretty sure Weisan has mentioned this sort of set up in the past

p nut
11-08-2016, 10:24 PM
Here is another set up from gravel cyclist:

http://www.gravelcyclist.com/bicycle-tech/featured-bike-sette-eldorado-monster-cross-bike/

Noah_Deuce
11-09-2016, 06:40 PM
I'm running the TanPan/685 road shifters+hydros/XT m8000 rear derailleur/11spd cassette, and I can report its flawless. That's my cyclocross setup, and would be great for a drop bar mtb.