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View Full Version : Well, I was spring cleaning...(antique bicycle content inside)


paredown
03-23-2016, 09:42 AM
...and decided to pump up the tires and blow the cobwebs off my original racing bike--1971 Falcon San Remo.

This is v. 2--I bent the top tube, and had the frame rebuilt back in the '80s--Imron Ferrari red, braze-ons for tt cable/waterbottle, some San Marco saddle etc. (Original was the classic Falcon powder blue with red head tube--lost the chrome rear "socks" and chrome head tube lugs when repairing/repainting.) Still has the (then uncommon) 53/42 front and 13-19 5 speed rear. (Somewhere along the way the 6 speeds I switched to seem to have vanished.)

I still have the original Brooks, so I think I will put that back on when I get serious about disassembling and regreasing everything. Need some lower gearing though if I'm going to ride it more than a block.:banana:

numbskull
03-23-2016, 10:08 AM
Be careful.

The feel of those bumpy campy shifter levers cradled in your palm, the sweet tinkling of the NR rear derailleur as it begins its shift, the delicate way the narrow brake hoods nestle into your hands, the reaching down to snug up your toe straps before a hard effort, the easy sway of the SL steel as you climb out of saddle......all that makes you feel young again. Intensely so, and it is addictive.

Lucky you.

cachagua
03-23-2016, 02:32 PM
Very, very beautiful. And nicely sized!

Yeah, I totally believe riding a bike like that could be addictive. Nice description, Mr. Numbskull.

deechee
03-23-2016, 03:36 PM
very nice. I'm impressed that saddle isn't all cracked and brown. Let us know how it rides!

Hindmost
03-23-2016, 04:51 PM
...my original racing bike--1971 Falcon San Remo.

Holy moly! That was exactly my first real bike too.

Got it at Velo Sport Berkeley, CA. Was a pretty sweet deal at the time. For about 7 years I rode the crap out of it until the right rear dropout snapped and a crack developed at the top of the downtube.

I was racing a twisty criterium and the rear wheel started to rub in a major way going up a steep short climb. After the climb I would coast, look down at the rear of the bike, and everything appeared in order. Had to quit the race; going backwards on the hill wasn't cutting it. I was super puzzled. Took me two days to find the hairline crack of the chromed dropout.

A friend with a torch was going to fix the frame for me--I still have a new headtube and two lugs--but one thing led to another and I never saw the frame again.

Frankwurst
03-23-2016, 07:06 PM
Be careful.

The feel of those bumpy campy shifter levers cradled in your palm, the sweet tinkling of the NR rear derailleur as it begins its shift, the delicate way the narrow brake hoods nestle into your hands, the reaching down to snug up your toe straps before a hard effort, the easy sway of the SL steel as you climb out of saddle......all that makes you feel young again. Intensely so, and it is addictive.

Lucky you.

Yup.:beer:

paredown
03-23-2016, 10:14 PM
very nice. I'm impressed that saddle isn't all cracked and brown. Let us know how it rides!

That's an '80s synthetic replacement--the original Brooks is well-used but in decent shape. Used to get the annual neatsfoot oil treatment and get stuffed with dry newspapers after long rides in the rain.

I'll Proofide it and try it out.

paredown
03-23-2016, 10:24 PM
Holy moly! That was exactly my first real bike too.

Got it at Velo Sport Berkeley, CA. Was a pretty sweet deal at the time. For about 7 years I rode the crap out of it until the right rear dropout snapped and a crack developed at the top of the downtube.

I was racing a twisty criterium and the rear wheel started to rub in a major way going up a steep short climb. After the climb I would coast, look down at the rear of the bike, and everything appeared in order. Had to quit the race; going backwards on the hill wasn't cutting it. I was super puzzled. Took me two days to find the hairline crack of the chromed dropout.

A friend with a torch was going to fix the frame for me--I still have a new headtube and two lugs--but one thing led to another and I never saw the frame again.
There were quite a few imported in the US, and for us in Canada, there were even more Brit bikes--Holdsworth/Claud Butlers/Raleigh/Carleton etc. Too bad yours went AWOL, they were nice riding frames.

I bent mine by dropping the front wheel into a rain grate--wasn't going too fast, so I didn't endo, but the leverage of that long fork on the tall headtube crinkled both top and down tubes.

I was still racing then (and poor) so my local shop did the 'straighten with broom sticks' fix, and got it close enough that I could still track with hands off the bar. Sometime in the '80s (after I had quit racing), my dad chipped in so I could get a proper fix done, and the same shop replaced top and down tubes, and resprayed it. They were building their own frames by that time, and had set up a spray booth and everything and did an excellent job.

I have moments when I think I would like to restore it--but have not really had the cash, besides which you still can find pristine examples out there for less than the cost of a really good restore/paintjob.

This is Peter Kohler's recent acquisition--only $167 as a bare frame--(not quite the same paint job as my old one, but close) and a good write up on the Falcon San Remo:
Peter Kohler's Falcon (http://www.ipernity.com/doc/286349/37525116/in/album/771954)

smontanaro
03-24-2016, 04:23 AM
What antique? I was expecting a penny farthing...

Nice bike. I have a small stable full of bikes from the 70s and 80s.

acorn_user
03-24-2016, 07:35 PM
Such a great story. Thanks for sharing.

wvaneaton
03-24-2016, 08:15 PM
Wow, what a lovely rediscovery. Beautiful!