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View Full Version : Romain Guyot killed in accident


tumbler
03-03-2016, 03:15 PM
Horrible.

http://velonews.competitor.com/2016/03/news/french-rider-23-killed-by-truck_397248

Young French cyclist Romain Guyot, just 23 years old, was killed by a truck on Thursday while training near Roche-Sur-Yon, France, according to regional paper Ouest France.

Guyot was involved in a crash with a truck in an intersection around noon. Medics and firefighters arrived on the scene, but were unable to save the young racer. Further details of the incident were not immediately available.

Guyot raced for Vendée-U, a regional team founded in 1991 by Jean-René Bernaudeau, the manager of the Direct Energie team. It served as a feeder for that Pro Continental squad and other top teams, sending riders like Roger Hammond, Nicolas Jalabert, Charlie Wegelius, and Brian Coquard into the sport’s upper echelon.

Guyot raced as a stagaire with Europcar at the end of the 2015 season.

velotrack
03-03-2016, 03:29 PM
Sad -may he rest in peace. Stay safe out there everybody.

bcroslin
03-03-2016, 03:52 PM
What other sport forces it's athletes to train in traffic? Ugh, terrible.

A local cat 1 and cycling coach was hit by a car here 2 days ago and will have to undergo extensive reconstructive surgery on his face. He was riding along minding his own business when a car turned left in front of him.

Honestly, there's days that I think we're all a little crazy riding bikes in the road.

AJM100
03-03-2016, 04:02 PM
"forces" is a bit strong, don't you think? Bet the decedent would disagree.

face it - it is inherently dangerous to ride with motorized vehicles made of tons of steel and operated by flawed human beings . . .

to some, that element of risk is why they ride the roads . . .

radsmd
03-03-2016, 04:09 PM
to some, that element of risk is why they ride the roads . . .

WHAT? Can't believe I just read that.

ripvanrando
03-03-2016, 04:14 PM
"forces" is a bit strong, don't you think? Bet the decedent would disagree.

face it - it is inherently dangerous to ride with motorized vehicles made of tons of steel and operated by flawed human beings . . .

to some, that element of risk is why they ride the roads . . .

If there is no choice, the circumstances force the issue.

Ride on the roads. What is the other option?

The lack of options forces a rider to ride on the road.

i don't follow your thinking, sorry.

sitzmark
03-03-2016, 06:16 PM
"forces" is a bit strong, don't you think? Bet the decedent would disagree.

face it - it is inherently dangerous to ride with motorized vehicles made of tons of steel and operated by flawed human beings . . .

to some, that element of risk is why they ride the roads . . .

If a "dance with death" is motivation for any cyclist, I suspect the number is infinitesimally small as a percentage of riders. There are many other extreme options for an adrenalin rush and pushing the envelope.

All I expect when going out for a ride is that we'll all do our best to ride/drive with a reasonable degree of responsibility. Mistakes will always happen. I accept that by choosing to ride (or even drive) on the roads. What I don't accept is "intentional negligence", the limits of which is probably defined differently depending on the individual. I certainly don't expect to die every time I go out to ride ... if that was the case, there are MUPS and other options for staying away from motor vehicles that I would chose.

All roadway deaths are sobering and disturbing, but I still believe the "odds" are reasonable if riding defensively and following the rules of the road.

Thoughts and condolences to Romain's family.

AJM100
03-03-2016, 06:54 PM
I was referring to the Brian Safa Wagners of the world, like all sports there are extreme adrenaline addicts . . . why is that so hard to believe . . . watch:

http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/latest-news/watch-daredevil-descent-mexico-city-traffic-video-155390

ripvanrando
03-03-2016, 07:05 PM
I was referring to the Brian Safa Wagners of the world, like all sports there are extreme adrenaline addicts . . . why is that so hard to believe . . . watch:

http://www.cyclingweekly.co.uk/news/latest-news/watch-daredevil-descent-mexico-city-traffic-video-155390

face it - it is inherently dangerous to ride with motorized vehicles made of tons of steel and operated by flawed human beings . . .

to one or two crazy riders of the world, that element of risk is why they ride the roads . . .

Ok, I get it now. fixed it for you. Some is a bit broad to fit the video

AJM100
03-03-2016, 07:08 PM
drive Boston near the Public Gardens during rush hour in the morning . . . there are plenty of them trust me . . .

smontanaro
03-04-2016, 08:59 AM
There are many other extreme options for an adrenalin rush and pushing the envelope.

I'm guessing most people who participate in extreme sports don't consider road cycling to be an extreme sport.

Mark McM
03-04-2016, 11:20 AM
What other sport forces it's athletes to train in traffic?

Here's a different perspective:

Because the roads are common ways, cyclists and motorists have to share the roads. Therefore, in order for a cyclist to get anywhere, they must often ride in traffic.

However, competitive cyclists shouldn't be training in traffic. Training usually requires certain types of efforts and/or types of riding styles, for some pre-determined duration. If traffic becomes an issue during a training session, then in the interest of safety, a competitive cyclist should curtail their current training activity to whatever extent prudent, and instead should share the road with traffic as any other non-competitive cyclist should. When traffic abates, they can resume their training activity. Some training activities, such as endurance distance rides, may be little affected by traffic, and may largely continue when traffic is present. But other training activities, such as maximal effort sprints, may be very unsafe in traffic, and should be curtailed if traffic is present.

As far as the Romain Guyot tragedy, do we know if he was actually training (i.e doing some type of training effort or activity) when the crash occurred? Or was riding as any other (non-competive) road cyclist would? Just because someone is a professional racing cyclist, it doesn't mean that they riding competitively every moment they are on a bike.

druptight
03-04-2016, 11:37 AM
drive Boston near the Public Gardens during rush hour in the morning . . . there are plenty of them trust me . . .

This is a pretty warped viewpoint you've got. As someone who spent years commuting in traffic in downtown Boston, and possibly one of those you're referring to, I can tell you with absolute certainty that neither I nor anyone I know who commutes in Boston does so because the risk of death on the morning commute is a rush. Furthermore, it's a little crass to be posting such thoughts in a thread about someone who just passed away while riding. :no:

chiasticon
03-04-2016, 12:44 PM
As far as the Romain Guyot tragedy, do we know if he was actually training (i.e doing some type of training effort or activity) when the crash occurred? Or was riding as any other (non-competive) road cyclist would? Just because someone is a professional racing cyclist, it doesn't mean that they riding competitively every moment they are on a bike.eh, pretty much any non-race ride is considered a training ride if you're a pro (or semi-pro, etc.). it's likely dictated by a coach and part of a training plan, even if it's an easy ride.

either way, awful news. rest in peace.

ripvanrando
03-04-2016, 12:50 PM
drive Boston near the Public Gardens during rush hour in the morning . . . there are plenty of them trust me . . .

i dunno. i used to commute to school up there about a million years ago. i don't remember anything like you relate

i think the local Med schools have some good clinical trials ongoing