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SlackMan
12-30-2014, 10:08 AM
"I don't even know if you can still buy steel frame bikes."

I've lamented here before about the sorry state of my LBS. Yesterday's phone call added to list of reasons I long for a better LBS. Thought some might find it entertaining in a sad sort of way. If you have a good LBS, be thankful.

Me: "I have an old steel frame road bike with 126mm drop out spacing. Could you cold set that to 130mm, and then check the alignment?"

LBS: "Gosh...uh...oh...I, uh...um...is that even possible? Do you know whether it's even possible?"

Me: "Yes, it's possible. There are instructions all over the web. I thought if you guys had done it before and had the tools to realign, it would be easier than doing it myself."

LBS: "Well...no...um...I don't think we can do that. We've never done that before."

Me: "I'll probably do it myself. If I get it powdercoated, could you guys chase and face the head tube, bottom bracket, etc.?

LBS: "Gosh...uh...oh...I, uh...um...yes, we can probably do that."

Me: "I have this old frame that I thought I would respace, paint, and put modern components on."

LBS: "Yes, well if you know the frame, that could be okay. I mean steel frame bikes are supposed to ride nicely. I don't even know if you can still buy steel frame bikes."

jmoore
12-30-2014, 10:15 AM
These kids today, sheesh!



Conversation at one of my local LBS with a kid at the counter.

Me: "I need a pair of internal cam skewers please."
Kid: "I don't know what that is."


Me: "Do you have any dropout adjustment screws?"
Kid: "I don't think so. What do they do?"


Me: "I'm building up a lugged steel Mondonico road frame."
Kid: "I've never heard of that before but it sounds cool."

christian
12-30-2014, 10:17 AM
Grateful for my LBS every day. Thanks for the reminder.

cash05458
12-30-2014, 10:23 AM
These kids today, sheesh!



Conversation at one of my local LBS with a kid at the counter.

Me: "I need a pair of internal cam skewers please."
Kid: "I don't know what that is."


Me: "Do you have any dropout adjustment screws?"
Kid: "I don't think so. What do they do?"


Me: "I'm building up a lugged steel Mondonico road frame."
Kid: "I've never heard of that before but it sounds cool."



ok, that really made me laugh...thanks!

texbike
12-30-2014, 10:23 AM
"I don't even know if you can still buy steel frame bikes."

I've lamented here before about the sorry state of my LBS. Yesterday's phone call added to list of reasons I long for a better LBS. Thought some might find it entertaining in a sad sort of way. If you have a good LBS, be thankful.

Me: "I have an old steel frame road bike with 126mm drop out spacing. Could you cold set that to 130mm, and then check the alignment?"

LBS: "Gosh...uh...oh...I, uh...um...is that even possible? Do you know whether it's even possible?"

Me: "Yes, it's possible. There are instructions all over the web. I thought if you guys had done it before and had the tools to realign, it would be easier than doing it myself."

LBS: "Well...no...um...I don't think we can do that. We've never done that before."

Me: "I'll probably do it myself. If I get it powdercoated, could you guys chase and face the head tube, bottom bracket, etc.?

LBS: "Gosh...uh...oh...I, uh...um...yes, we can probably do that."

Me: "I have this old frame that I thought I would respace, paint, and put modern components on."

LBS: "Yes, well if you know the frame, that could be okay. I mean steel frame bikes are supposed to ride nicely. I don't even know if you can still buy steel frame bikes."


Funny! It sounds like a kid that just doesn't know his stuff.

I helped a friend remove a BB cup from an old Colnago yesterday. A local shop said that it was stuck and couldn't be removed without cutting the cup out. It took us about a minute to remove it. Apparently the shop didn't realize that the BB was Italian-threaded and was trying to remove the cup by turning it in the wrong direction.

Texbike

cash05458
12-30-2014, 10:24 AM
Funny! It sounds like a kid that just doesn't know his stuff.

I helped a friend remove a BB cup from an old Colnago yesterday that a local shop said was stuck and couldn't be removed without cutting the cup out. It took us about a minute to remove it. Apparently the shop didn't realize that the BB was Italian-threaded and was trying to remove the cup by turning it in the wrong direction.

Texbike

lol...this is just gonna get better and better I have a feelin'...

ceolwulf
12-30-2014, 10:30 AM
Chasing and facing bottom brackets definitely seems to be too much to ask anywhere I've tried.

Ralph
12-30-2014, 10:38 AM
Many bike shops (but not all) are not in the business of supplying what many of us need and want. They have a different business plan. I figure that's their business. It's their investment to figure out how to make the best return on.

I know a bike shop would starve if it relied on my business and people like me. I get what I can locally, mostly stuff I need to try on....shoes, jerseys, shorts, etc, and that adds up to considerable dollars for whole family each year, but otherwise most of us don't need the typical services of a modern large bike shop tied to a name brand bicycle company like Specialized or Trek. I just don't need much from the Trek store (CO2's or tubes
maybe). Any tools I don't have for repair work, I know guys who have them....and know how to use them.

I would not even consider walking into my local Trek store and asking them anything technical about a bike (although in fairness....many of them do have an old wrench who does know......you just don't usually get to him at first).

maxcolumbus
12-30-2014, 10:39 AM
A lot of the shops locally are Trek, Specialized, or Giant sponsored "superstores". Anything that's out of the box is usually not going to get done. I brought my new Hampsten to a local shop and hear "Whoa.. Steel frame and Campy??? Old school!!"
I explained that I heard a constant click in the rear wheel when pedaling. Two exasperated mechanics later, they could not find it. Finally, the manager grabs the bike and rides it for all of 20 feet, then smugly declares that my chain line is out so there must be an issue with the frame.
Needless to say I take the bike back home only to discover I had a broken pawl spring in my free hub. 75 cents and 20 minutes later I'm riding click free.
Unbelievable. However i have found two very good shops here that I use all the time. Great mechanics and very nice people.

thirdgenbird
12-30-2014, 10:40 AM
Chasing and facing bottom brackets definitely seems to be too much to ask anywhere I've tried.

Yep. I tried the local shop and most of the main shops in Des Moines. All of them claimed to not have the tools. On the flip side, the first three shops I called in the twin cities didn't hesitate to say they could do it.

wildboar
12-30-2014, 10:40 AM
I visited one of my LBS looking for a Campy seatpost binder bolt. After the mechanic declared he didn't know what one of those was, he brought a drawer with 10 pounds of misc. used stem bolts for me to look through. No, they did not have one.

stronzo
12-30-2014, 10:48 AM
Ha, guess we're lucky to have some decent shops in ATX. Still do most of my own work because I have trust issues...:rolleyes:

MattTuck
12-30-2014, 11:04 AM
In their defense, a young kid starting out is probably not dealing with some of these more esoteric issues on a day to day basis. For the average mechanic, I bet it is a lot of "tune ups", derailleur adjustments, new cables, truing up a wheel. To get enough reps to be competent and comfortable on something like cold setting, you either need to do them frequently, or have worked as a wrench long enough that even infrequent attempts add up to a decent number.

I really wouldn't fault a 20 year old kid for that. It is a function of the type of business the shop gets.

It is like a surgeon. Do you want the general surgeon right out of his residency or grey haired specialist with 20 years cutting on a particular body part?

FastforaSlowGuy
12-30-2014, 11:19 AM
I think MT hit it - bike shops spend 99.5% of their time dealing with issues that folks on this forum would do on their own without thinking twice. I spent 2 years working as a mechanic in a reputable shop when I was a kid, and apart from building up bikes for the sales floor, 50% of my day was spent changing flats and tuning shift cables. Wheel truing was pretty rare, and anything on a frame was rarer still. I certainly had to know how to do all that stuff, because the head mechanic demanded real skills from his team, but it would have taken me a second to realize that I was being asked to do some REAL work for a change.

This was 20 years ago, and with the proliferation of carbon bikes, I would guess the number of people who have ever seen a frame re-aligned or BB chased is dwindling.

bcroslin
12-30-2014, 11:22 AM
In their defense, a young kid starting out is probably not dealing with some of these more esoteric issues on a day to day basis. For the average mechanic, I bet it is a lot of "tune ups", derailleur adjustments, new cables, truing up a wheel. To get enough reps to be competent and comfortable on something like cold setting, you either need to do them frequently, or have worked as a wrench long enough that even infrequent attempts add up to a decent number.

I really wouldn't fault a 20 year old kid for that. It is a function of the type of business the shop gets.

It is like a surgeon. Do you want the general surgeon right out of his residency or grey haired specialist with 20 years cutting on a particular body part?

THIS. You can't fault the kid making minimum wage at the LBS because the owner is hanging on for dear life while we buy $500 group sets from Ribble. I know there's other factors in play but I don't see how a bike shop owner can afford to pay a master mechanic what they're worth when 80% of your clientele wants to know why you can't sell them a complete for the same price as bikesdirect.com.

I had an eye opening conversation the other day with a mechanic I respect. A client came in to the LBS and dropped $40k on 2 high-end bikes and we were both commenting on how insane that was. He then said it was unbelievable to him because that's more than he makes in a year. Damn.

jmoore
12-30-2014, 11:34 AM
In fairness to my post above, it was the kid at the counter. The mechanics knew what I was talking about when I got to talk to them.

Most of the LBS in my area are very good. I've been to them enough to know who to talk to so I don't have to deal with the 19yo at the counter who only knows Trek-alized.

SlackMan
12-30-2014, 11:37 AM
To put a sad exclamation point on my story that started this thread, I'm pretty sure I was talking to the owner of the shop. Yes, I can see cutting a kid some slack, but not a bike shop owner who doesn't know basic facts or skills.

bcroslin
12-30-2014, 11:53 AM
To put a sad exclamation point on my story that started this thread, I'm pretty sure I was talking to the owner of the shop. Yes, I can see cutting a kid some slack, but not a bike shop owner who doesn't know basic facts or skills.

ouch.

FlashUNC
12-30-2014, 11:55 AM
I once had a counter guy try to upsell me on new Look pedals. My PP296s were still going strong. "You know, those steel axles can warp over time."

Uh, if my 110 watts is warping a steel pedal axle, then I don't see how the pedal could last me 13 years.

Especially when his suggested replacement was their $60 plastic injection molded pedal.

I'm good chief, just go find me some Delta cleats.

unterhausen
12-30-2014, 11:57 AM
Apparently the shop didn't realize that the BB was Italian-threaded and was trying to remove the cup by turning it in the wrong direction.

Texbikethat's an easy mistake, but I doubt my LBS would make it. Maybe some of the less experienced guys. I helped my LBS take out a fixed cup on a French bike that was Swiss threaded. I don't think I've ever seen one of those before, but I had a dim memory that before they gave up on metric threads, some manufacturers switched to Swiss

They have a batch of bikes with steel frames. Not as many as they once had, but they are a big Surly dealer and also sell some of the All City bikes.

FastforaSlowGuy
12-30-2014, 11:57 AM
To put a sad exclamation point on my story that started this thread, I'm pretty sure I was talking to the owner of the shop. Yes, I can see cutting a kid some slack, but not a bike shop owner who doesn't know basic facts or skills.

Wow. Disregard everything I said before.

Peter B
12-30-2014, 12:27 PM
Its unfortunate but not unexpected. Some of us are showing our years and unique enthusiasm. As an analogy, imagine I walk into my local Radio Shack, tell the counter kid I need to overhaul my Model 8, ask if he can align the tuner and throw in a 5uF axial electrolytic and a pair of these...:eek:

FastforaSlowGuy
12-30-2014, 12:31 PM
This thread actually reminds me of my car shopping experience recently. I was chatting with the sales guy and lamenting the demise of naturally aspirated engines. He looked at me with a puzzled stare, before responding "Yeah, not many manuals around anymore." Huh?

SpokeValley
12-30-2014, 01:50 PM
Like most of this gang, I do nearly everything for my bikes, and I think the only tools I don't have are for chasing/facing...a bit spendy, and no need.

The discussion here kind of motivates me to make a few phone calls, though. I'd like to see the reactions.

BTW, I wear "Old School" like a badge of honor.

majorpat
12-30-2014, 01:54 PM
Bike shops are a lot like barbers, tough to find a good one but once you do...loyalty.

FlashUNC
12-30-2014, 02:16 PM
Bike shops are a lot like barbers, tough to find a good one but once you do...loyalty.

Agreed. I was crushed recently when a shop that had been doing great work for me so far told me that they didn't have any of the dropout alignment tools to check something for me.

I was aghast. Like getting told by someone they didn't want to go on a second date with me. "But I liked you guys! What happened? Where did we go wrong?"

bargainguy
12-30-2014, 02:25 PM
This thread actually reminds me of my car shopping experience recently. I was chatting with the sales guy and lamenting the demise of naturally aspirated engines. He looked at me with a puzzled stare, before responding "Yeah, not many manuals around anymore." Huh?

Car salesman who didn't know "naturally aspirated" = "not boosted"? Wow. If you don't mind me asking, was that new or used, and what brand dealership?

FastforaSlowGuy
12-30-2014, 02:31 PM
Car salesman who didn't know "naturally aspirated" = "not boosted"? Wow. If you don't mind me asking, was that new or used, and what brand dealership?

Happened at the Audi dealer. The brand is sort of married to turbo engines, so maybe I shouldn't be surprised, but shouldn't they wonder what makes a turbo "turbo"? But I've had it happen at a BMW dealer, too, albeit in a less obvious way (i.e., blank stare).

Bad enough that they are phasing out free breathing engines, but to erase even the memory of those beautiful things borders on criminal. Like asking cyclist to pretend that threaded bottom brackets never existed, and we've always pressed bearings directly in our frames.

jmoore
12-30-2014, 03:41 PM
Agreed. I was crushed recently when a shop that had been doing great work for me so far told me that they didn't have any of the dropout alignment tools to check something for me.

I was aghast. Like getting told by someone they didn't want to go on a second date with me. "But I liked you guys! What happened? Where did we go wrong?"

It's not you, it's me.

josephr
12-30-2014, 03:55 PM
Bike shops are a lot like barbers, tough to find a good one but once you do...loyalty.

funny...my LBS has a barber shop on the end of the building...walked in one day and got a cut....they'll even hold my spot in line if there's folks waiting for the chair and I'll go next door look around, chat, usually try buy a part....

93legendti
12-30-2014, 04:26 PM
Next time, ask for Miikka at the Bloomfield Hills Performance Bike Store. ;)

Md3000
12-30-2014, 07:38 PM
I decided to grab a coffee at my local LBS here in northern Virginia, and when I saw the mechanic had some spare time I asked if he could raise my seat a bit. (It was a short ride and I didn't bring anything to do it myself) he snapped the seat post bolt and then said to me: "yeap, that's what you get with Eddy Merckx !" And then made me pay for a new bolt

christian
12-30-2014, 07:55 PM
To be fair, those Campagnolo binder bolts do sort of suck.

r_mutt
12-31-2014, 12:16 AM
the campy seat binder bolt was made to break like that when too much torque is applied - better to snap a $20 bolt rather than destroy a frame.

brockd15
12-31-2014, 12:59 AM
I needed some odd sized ferrules for a frame so I took it to the shop with me.

The mechanics couldn't find one that fit but had a few that were a bit too big.

They told me not to worry, the frame is steel, we'll just pry open the stops on the frame with a screw driver.

I had to jump in to keep them from it. There was no asking, it was just gonna happen, and would have if I hadn't been standing right there with them.

likebikes
12-31-2014, 01:22 AM
"I don't even know if you can still buy steel frame bikes."

I've lamented here before about the sorry state of my LBS. Yesterday's phone call added to list of reasons I long for a better LBS. Thought some might find it entertaining in a sad sort of way. If you have a good LBS, be thankful.

Me: "I have an old steel frame road bike with 126mm drop out spacing. Could you cold set that to 130mm, and then check the alignment?"

LBS: "Gosh...uh...oh...I, uh...um...is that even possible? Do you know whether it's even possible?"

Me: "Yes, it's possible. There are instructions all over the web. I thought if you guys had done it before and had the tools to realign, it would be easier than doing it myself."

LBS: "Well...no...um...I don't think we can do that. We've never done that before."

Me: "I'll probably do it myself. If I get it powdercoated, could you guys chase and face the head tube, bottom bracket, etc.?

LBS: "Gosh...uh...oh...I, uh...um...yes, we can probably do that."

Me: "I have this old frame that I thought I would respace, paint, and put modern components on."

LBS: "Yes, well if you know the frame, that could be okay. I mean steel frame bikes are supposed to ride nicely. I don't even know if you can still buy steel frame bikes."
These kids today, sheesh!



Conversation at one of my local LBS with a kid at the counter.

Me: "I need a pair of internal cam skewers please."
Kid: "I don't know what that is."


Me: "Do you have any dropout adjustment screws?"
Kid: "I don't think so. What do they do?"


Me: "I'm building up a lugged steel Mondonico road frame."
Kid: "I've never heard of that before but it sounds cool."

Look at the one thing in common with both of these experiences:

Location: Texas
Location: Dallas, TX

likebikes
12-31-2014, 01:29 AM
This thread actually reminds me of my car shopping experience recently. I was chatting with the sales guy and lamenting the demise of naturally aspirated engines. He looked at me with a puzzled stare, before responding "Yeah, not many manuals around anymore." Huh?
naturally aspirated engines are absolutely not in demise.

though, not at the audi dealership, that's for sure.

oldpotatoe
12-31-2014, 05:47 AM
What amazes me is these shops, even most here in the republic, slug it out every year not only with the other big bike brand, shops around but also have to contend with the inside/outside, factory people who do a lot to make owning a bike shop really hard.

I know a guy who sold Giant..did well, then one day he hears another BIG local shop, who lost Spec-ed, was going to sell Giant and he was going to lose it.

No calls, no visits. I don't think it's hard to figure out that in any place, there are 4-6 car dealers, but 30+ car repair places. More dealers, way more car repair laces. No reason it can't work with bikes too. Economy of scale(bigger is NOT always better), identifying your target market, and aggressively pursuing that market.

"The shop up the street sells Spec ed and Trek, I can open a 5000 square foot shop 10 blocks away, sell Giant and Kona and do fine, right"? "And I know I'm less than a block from that high end repair shop, but that's ok, right?"

Happened in Boulder, 3 stores, now 2 and mostly owned by Giant cuz..well, they just are now.

Happens every day.

I would rather stand on the corner with a piece of cardboard than EVER own or even work in, a trekspecializedgiantcannondale...put name of big bikeinnabox, brand here.

AND that's one of the reasons you see what you see at LBS'. Some are good, a lot are clueless when it comes to anything but their brand, new, outta a box and sometimes not even then.

I'll bet the same with other industries, like skiis, but don't really know.

oldpotatoe
12-31-2014, 05:52 AM
To be fair, those Campagnolo binder bolts do sort of suck.

To be fair, they are designed to break before breaking your frame..

ultraman6970
12-31-2014, 07:00 AM
That happened at lizzard???

I decided to grab a coffee at my local LBS here in northern Virginia, and when I saw the mechanic had some spare time I asked if he could raise my seat a bit. (It was a short ride and I didn't bring anything to do it myself) he snapped the seat post bolt and then said to me: "yeap, that's what you get with Eddy Merckx !" And then made me pay for a new bolt

ultraman6970
12-31-2014, 07:01 AM
Never been able to snap one ever tho... I dont even use a torque wrench either... all timer, all by feel :P

the campy seat binder bolt was made to break like that when too much torque is applied - better to snap a $20 bolt rather than destroy a frame.

mktng
12-31-2014, 07:38 AM
Never been able to snap one ever tho... I dont even use a torque wrench either... all timer, all by feel :P
I usually stop tightening at one grunt. I can't afford a torque wrench.

FastforaSlowGuy
12-31-2014, 07:52 AM
naturally aspirated engines are absolutely not in demise.

You, sir, need to go car shopping. Turbos, turbos everywhere, even when they aren't explicitly advertised as such. Though that's probably less true for Detroit brands. (There's a reason the Caddy CTS drives so nice.)

Back on topic, though:

A few years back I brought my bike into a local shop to pick up a new stem and have my steerer tube cut down. Came back a couple days later to pick up the bike, and they had sold my old stem on eBay. Um, what? The explanation I got from the owner was that his customers have never wanted their old parts back. I've not been back.

oldpotatoe
12-31-2014, 11:23 AM
You, sir, need to go car shopping. Turbos, turbos everywhere, even when they aren't explicitly advertised as such. Though that's probably less true for Detroit brands. (There's a reason the Caddy CTS drives so nice.)

Back on topic, though:

A few years back I brought my bike into a local shop to pick up a new stem and have my steerer tube cut down. Came back a couple days later to pick up the bike, and they had sold my old stem on eBay. Um, what? The explanation I got from the owner was that his customers have never wanted their old parts back. I've not been back.

Yowser did they offer to give you the $? But a-maz-ing

weisan
12-31-2014, 11:27 AM
Anyone can open a bike shop - tom, dick & harry, especially hairy, .. It's not a joke when I said the sunset was a bit less pretty the day when old pal hang his campy apron. :D

http://i1.cpcache.com/product/828504344/vintage_campagnolo_bicycles_sign_apron.jpg?color=W hite&height=460&width=460&qv=90

FastforaSlowGuy
12-31-2014, 11:37 AM
Yowser did they offer to give you the $? But a-maz-ing

I should have demanded they do so, but honestly it was the last in a line of things that pi$$ed me off, and I wanted to just get out of there. The same shop owner, when he found out my wife was buying a Seven, tried to tell her that titanium was "dangerous to ride" and custom bikes were all "prototypes waiting to fail."

R3awak3n
12-31-2014, 11:40 AM
/\ wow thats a winning bike shop.


We have plenty of bad shops here in NYC but being NYC we also have a lot of good shops. 2 of my local shops are awesome but there is 1 you wouldnt catch me dead in.

oldpotatoe
12-31-2014, 11:49 AM
Anyone can open a bike shop - tom, dick & harry, especially hairy, .. It's not a joke when I said the sunset was a bit less pretty the day when old pal hang his campy apron. :D

Well, not dead yet and have a complete repair shop in my garage, complete with Campagnolo tool kit. I will do anything for any formite like wheel builds or Ergo overhaul. Not free but lower overhead. AND when grand daughters in school more, ya never know. 500 square foot store front(mostly so I can get product) is a possibility.

BUT Campagnolo service only, custom wheels(on any hubset). I Intend to do what I want, no outside pressure, Campag service and custom wheels.

don compton
12-31-2014, 12:56 PM
In my home town (Lodi,Ca.), there are no good repair shops. I have to travel 30 miles north to Sacramento. No big deal as I have more than one bike. I do most of the adjustment and cleaning myself, but when I need help I have two great shops in Sacramento, Rex Cycles and The Bicycle Business. Both are outstanding and enjoy working on my "old" Campy equipped steel bikes. And when going to either shop, they're friendly, always remember my name and stand behind their work.

Bob Ross
12-31-2014, 05:56 PM
bike shops spend 99.5% of their time dealing with issues that folks on this forum would do on their own without thinking twice.

I remember walking into the back room mechanic's area at our LBS a few years ago to pick up my wife's bike, and the shop wrench was fixing a flat on a beautiful Landshark that was up on the workstand. I pointed to the Landshark and said "Nice bike, what's that in here for?" He smirked and pointed to the tube he was changing.

Bob Ross
12-31-2014, 05:57 PM
Campagnolo service only, custom wheels(on any hubset). I Intend to do what I want, no outside pressure, Campag service and custom wheels.


[x] Like

endosch2
12-31-2014, 06:50 PM
I think most of the people on this forum do not represent what the market is for bikes and the OP proved it. So what if some bike shop junior employee does not know about esoteric way back machine retro parts and frames. I am not seeing the point. There is very little commercial value to the tastes and preferences of people so know so much more about bikes than everyone else like the ones on this forum. This is the end of the long tail of a market.

majorpat
12-31-2014, 07:47 PM
Well, not dead yet and have a complete repair shop in my garage, complete with Campagnolo tool kit. I will do anything for any formite like wheel builds or Ergo overhaul. Not free but lower overhead. AND when grand daughters in school more, ya never know. 500 square foot store front(mostly so I can get product) is a possibility.

BUT Campagnolo service only, custom wheels(on any hubset). I Intend to do what I want, no outside pressure, Campag service and custom wheels.

The resurrection, thanks be! My OP handbuilt wheels are one of my favorite things.

cash05458
12-31-2014, 08:24 PM
Pete...that sounds awesome...you made my night!

cash05458
12-31-2014, 08:27 PM
I think most of the people on this forum do not represent what the market is for bikes and the OP proved it. So what if some bike shop junior employee does not know about esoteric way back machine retro parts and frames. I am not seeing the point. There is very little commercial value to the tastes and preferences of people so know so much more about bikes than everyone else like the ones on this forum. This is the end of the long tail of a market.


I think the OP meant this thread more in good humor...not a big serious thing...you know, old guy stuff...me on a daily basis: "those darned kids and their new fangled carbon crap machines..."

maddog17
12-31-2014, 10:51 PM
sad thing is that most shops don't carry steel anymore since the companies who we've owned or lusted over don't make them anymore. but any shop should at least teach their people to ask someone if they can't answer the question. no sense in giving an idk or never heard of that as an answer. for me that's a sign to stay away and find another shop.

Javaman
01-01-2015, 12:41 AM
For me, an LBS is not just a place where to get bike parts, it should also be the source of knowledge and answer on whatever bike questions you might have. So I expect them to know "at least" a little bit of the old stuff even though the guy on the other side of the counter don't have any idea who Eddy Merckx is.

oldpotatoe
01-01-2015, 05:18 AM
For me, an LBS is not just a place where to get bike parts, it should also be the source of knowledge and answer on whatever bike questions you might have. So I expect them to know "at least" a little bit of the old stuff even though the guy on the other side of the counter don't have any idea who Eddy Merckx is.

And a fridge with beer, and sometimes decent music and often some 18 year old scotch and....

Cicli
01-01-2015, 05:21 AM
All of my local shops are mainly retail stores. Bummer.
They are not touching my bikes.

majorpat
01-01-2015, 06:31 AM
All of my local shops are mainly retail stores. Bummer.
They are not touching my bikes.

That sums it up. Most shops are just a place to (hopefully) find a part or get tubes, few offer genuine knowledge or experience. Of course, Few areas of the country possess the population of dedicated bikers who are also willing to spend. And those that do have the population willing to spend regularly on bikes mainly have no clue of cyclings roots. Not really their fault, they cut their teeth on the boom of the early 2000's when the last of the metal bikes had already vanished from the pro peloton and from most shop floors a few years later.

Kind of like how EMS used to be a source of outdoor knowledge and you trusted their advice. Now, I may go in there to buy a pair of boots, only after doing all my own research. The only attraction is I can try on several sizes and not pay any shipping.

I don't live where there is access to a world class shop and I regret never getting to Vecchio's while Peter conned the ship. On travels, though, I'm probably like a lot of us here and will seek out shops just to check them out. River City in Portland was a winner, so was Wheat Ridge in Colo. I'm only a couple hours from Savile Road, need to stop in there sometime.

Hey! Brilliant business plan, a chain of shops across the US staffed with bike geniuses from the Paceline. Wow, I just realized the true value of this forum.

Javaman
01-01-2015, 06:46 AM
And a fridge with beer, and sometimes decent music and often some 18 year old scotch and....

Those are bonuses!:):banana:

bikinchris
01-01-2015, 10:03 AM
Hey, everyone wants cheaper, cheaper, cheaper. Buy online. Get a the ····ty local shops you asked for in return.

Cicli
01-01-2015, 10:08 AM
Hey, everyone wants cheaper, cheaper, cheaper. Buy online. Get a the ····ty local shops you asked for in return.

As the world turns.

FastforaSlowGuy
01-01-2015, 10:22 AM
Blaming the internet is like blaming cars for the demise of the buggy. Most bike shops are poorly run and ill positioned to compete. Can't blame the customer for a business model that doesn't work. OP is onto something- find a niche and fill it. That's capitalism friends.


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dekindy
01-01-2015, 11:01 AM
You could change the name of this discussion to any other industry.

chiasticon
01-02-2015, 11:33 AM
i'm way more picky with letting a bike shop work on my bike. little stuff sets me off. for example, i have a ritte with a light blue top tube and seatpost. i once had a shop do $75 worth of repairs and hand the bike back to me with chain lube all over the top tube, shifter hoods (they were white) and seat post. seriously? couldn't take two minutes to wipe it down afterwards or at least be careful when handling it? i was upset too because it was one of those rare shops you walk into for the first time and immediately talk to a qualified and skilled wrench who also senses that you're not a moron and treats you appropriately.

GeorgeTSquirrel
01-02-2015, 11:41 PM
Chasing and facing bottom brackets definitely seems to be too much to ask anywhere I've tried.

For the record, it took me seven tries before I found a shop that even carried the tool! :(

GeorgeTSquirrel
01-02-2015, 11:56 PM
And a fridge with beer, and sometimes decent music and often some 18 year old scotch and....

Price of admission if I'm ever visiting the Republic? LOL

thirdgenbird
01-03-2015, 12:16 AM
For the record, it took me seven tries before I found a shop that even carried the tool! :(

I gave up around that number and found a fame builder.

oldpotatoe
01-03-2015, 05:53 AM
Price of admission if I'm ever visiting the Republic? LOL

Nope, always free to anybody that asks, even the $100 a bottle Scotch..want a slosh?-anytime of day(it's after 12:00 somewhere), just ask..particularly these last few VERY cold days..a couple of fingers warms you down to your very toes..

Md3000
01-04-2015, 06:48 PM
the campy seat binder bolt was made to break like that when too much torque is applied - better to snap a $20 bolt rather than destroy a frame.

I guess I'm blessed the good man was willing to show me how to snap it then

bikinchris
01-04-2015, 07:46 PM
Blaming the internet is like blaming cars for the demise of the buggy. Most bike shops are poorly run and ill positioned to compete. Can't blame the customer for a business model that doesn't work. OP is onto something- find a niche and fill it. That's capitalism friends.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Touché, Monsieur. I guess I am lucky in that I own a bicycle shop that has several torque wrenches that are actually used and taps, dies and facing tools.