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dk2ck
10-12-2014, 03:22 AM
I recently moved from California to the PNW and am getting ready for the rain to start this Fall. What are the best shoe covers for the rain?

xjoex
10-12-2014, 10:54 AM
For rain I think the best shoe cover is the Showers Pass Club Shoe Covers
http://robonza.blogspot.com/2009/10/review-showers-pass-club-shoe-cover.html

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_Jz4f840sc_c/Ss9syFW2nqI/AAAAAAAACKc/GwQQ7aGxRFI/s600/IMGP1009.JPG

But if it's cold, I like the 40 Below Overflow supergaiter.
http://robonza.blogspot.com/2014/01/review-forty-below-overflow-gaiters.html
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-teKcby1wt14/UtHz0gLhC_I/AAAAAAAAPZY/Azffj8HKh-c/s700/P1110406.jpg
You do have to permanently attach it though. Which if it is really cold, is worth it.


-Joe

11.4
10-12-2014, 02:25 PM
Showers Pass is good for commuting but for a serious training ride it's got a lot of fabric, and it tends to rub on crank arms. The 40 Below is good but overkill unless you are fat-tire riding on Rainier. There are plenty of ultra-expensive shoe covers and booties but the Endura are cheap, durable, and keep you dry and warm. There's a version on which the entire outside surface is covered in reflective material -- they are very visible on twilight training rides. Something like $39 a pair and they last forever, do everything you expect a bootie to do. They are very stretchy but don't buy them to fit with stretch -- you want enough play so they don't constrict circulation in your feet. That's usually about one size bigger than you think you need. For Portland or Seattle, these are the best around.

ceolwulf
10-12-2014, 02:38 PM
I really like my Louis Garneau neoprene covers. It has to be fairly cold to use those though. The LG Lycra covers are also very good but not water resistant so not likely helpful for you.

dk2ck
10-12-2014, 03:11 PM
Showers Pass is good for commuting but for a serious training ride it's got a lot of fabric, and it tends to rub on crank arms. The 40 Below is good but overkill unless you are fat-tire riding on Rainier. There are plenty of ultra-expensive shoe covers and booties but the Endura are cheap, durable, and keep you dry and warm. There's a version on which the entire outside surface is covered in reflective material -- they are very visible on twilight training rides. Something like $39 a pair and they last forever, do everything you expect a bootie to do. They are very stretchy but don't buy them to fit with stretch -- you want enough play so they don't constrict circulation in your feet. That's usually about one size bigger than you think you need. For Portland or Seattle, these are the best around.

This is exactly the kind of input I was looking for. Thanks! Are these the ones you would recommend? http://www.endurasport.com/products/?ProductID=207

Climb01742
10-12-2014, 05:43 PM
the best pair of booties is a good pair of fenders.




that said, i'd think about using two different booties for two different conditions. for lighter, misty rain, you want something lighter. i've had good luck with these (though others apparently haven't):

http://www.competitivecyclist.com/castelli-nano-shoe-cover?ti=U2VhcmNoIFJlc3VsdHM6Y2FzdGVsbGkgc29ja3M6M TozMDpjYXN0ZWxsaSBzb2Nrcw&skidn=CST0475-SI-S

then for heavier, soaking rains, follow 11.4's advice.

11.4
10-12-2014, 09:13 PM
This is exactly the kind of input I was looking for. Thanks! Are these the ones you would recommend? http://www.endurasport.com/products/?ProductID=207

Yup. The silver ones. With fenders, as Climb says -- doesn't have to be said.

ginsued
10-12-2014, 09:48 PM
I have heard positive things about these:
http://www.velotoze.com

They are really new but look pretty cool. Will hopefully solve the problem I have with show covers not being tight around my ankles.

I recently moved from California to the PNW and am getting ready for the rain to start this Fall. What are the best shoe covers for the rain?

oldpotatoe
10-13-2014, 08:03 AM
the best pair of booties is a good pair of fenders.




that said, i'd think about using two different booties for two different conditions. for lighter, misty rain, you want something lighter. i've had good luck with these (though others apparently haven't):

http://www.competitivecyclist.com/castelli-nano-shoe-cover?ti=U2VhcmNoIFJlc3VsdHM6Y2FzdGVsbGkgc29ja3M6M TozMDpjYXN0ZWxsaSBzb2Nrcw&skidn=CST0475-SI-S

then for heavier, soaking rains, follow 11.4's advice.

Bing, bing, bing....

I use Curve, 2 types, one slides on like a sock, no zipper, the other has a zipper..but fenders will keep your feet driest..front and rear, full fenders.

xeladragon
10-13-2014, 10:22 AM
My waterproof shoe covers (Mavic brand) work fine for light rain, but if I'm caught in a downpour, my feet/socks/shoes are gonna get soaked due to water streaming down my legs and through the gap(s) at the top of the shoe cover. Is there a shoe cover that doesn't have this issue? Or is the only solution to wear waterproof pants as well? Pants won't work for warm weather though.

Lionel
10-13-2014, 10:41 AM
Is there a shoe cover that doesn't have this issue?

Not that I know of.

LJohnny
10-13-2014, 11:20 AM
Not that I know of.
In theory the Velotoze posted above should not have the issue, if working as advertized. I am waiting on a pair.

Lionel
10-13-2014, 11:27 AM
In theory the Velotoze posted above should not have the issue, if working as advertized. I am waiting on a pair.

call me skeptical on this one but please report back !

My experience for riding in real rain is that full neoprene covers are best. You feet get wet but they stay warm. Same for full neoprene gloves.

druptight
10-13-2014, 11:33 AM
Other problem with those Velotoze things is that they look like basically thin rubber booties - i.e. won't stand up to much abuse. Walk 5 feet or push off after a few red lights and I have a feeling you've got a hole in the underside of the toe pretty quickly. From their FAQ (not confidence inspiring):

How long do they last?
veloToze are designed to be used multiple times, but if you take them on and off carefully and follow the proper care instructions, they can last longer.

LJohnny
10-13-2014, 01:40 PM
I should have mentioned that I plan to use these as a first layer with a neoprene boot in the exterior. I figured the Velotoze look pretty low profile that an extra layer outside should be no problem. We'll see.

Likes2ridefar
10-13-2014, 02:00 PM
for riding in heavy rain the only thing I ever found that kept my feet dry is a gaiter typically used for hiking. I just wear them with a waterproof commuter shoe and a rain pant. I find it a lot less messy on/off and no worries about tearing them up walking around.

gaiter over shoe, pant over gaiter.

EDS
10-13-2014, 07:20 PM
Other problem with those Velotoze things is that they look like basically thin rubber booties - i.e. won't stand up to much abuse. Walk 5 feet or push off after a few red lights and I have a feeling you've got a hole in the underside of the toe pretty quickly. From their FAQ (not confidence inspiring):

How long do they last?
veloToze are designed to be used multiple times, but if you take them on and off carefully and follow the proper care instructions, they can last longer.

For $15 I am going to give them a try this spring and will report back on my experience.

LJohnny
01-13-2015, 08:10 AM
Tried the velotoze and in my case one use deal.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

dekindy
01-13-2015, 09:56 AM
Tried the velotoze and in my case one use deal.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I don't understand what you mean?

BdaGhisallo
01-13-2015, 01:53 PM
I have heard positive things about these:
http://www.velotoze.com

They are really new but look pretty cool. Will hopefully solve the problem I have with show covers not being tight around my ankles.

I bought a few pairs of these. I only need water protection and these did a better job than any other shoe cover I've ever tried. They didn't keep all the water out (some came in through the cleat hole) but I don't think a totally waterproof bootie can be invented. They are low bulk and seal very tightly around your ankles so you don't get any water trickling in from the top.

They may not prove as durable as other types, but they are only $15 a pop.

LJohnny
01-13-2015, 01:57 PM
I don't understand what you mean?

There was a point raised on whether these would be durable. i.e. re-usable, suitable for more than one ride.

I got a pair and used them on a steady rain ride. Using the Velotoze covers by themselves, I found that the durability was not great. Just by using them on the bike, clipping, un-clipping, foot down, contact with pedals, etc, there were a few nicks on the material (bottom). I didn't walk more than 10 meters total on them.
Also, after the ride I took them off, rinsed them with warm water, and hung them to dry (using a cloth hanger as tool to keep them pried open while drying). After they dried, I noticed that the material was too sticky. Not re-useable in my opinion, at least in the conditions I described above.

They do stay very tight to your leg, thus I didn't get any rain coming in from the top and they work well as rain covers. Just not durable. If they were about $8, then I'd say it would be a good option, as a one-use item.

LJohnny
01-13-2015, 02:03 PM
I bought a few pairs of these. I only need water protection and these did a better job than any other shoe cover I've ever tried. They didn't keep all the water out (some came in through the cleat hole) but I don't think a totally waterproof bootie can be invented. They are low bulk and seal very tightly around your ankles so you don't get any water trickling in from the top.

They may not prove as durable as other types, but they are only $15 a pop.

Have you been able to re-use them? As stated above, after drying, they were too malleable, sticky, in my case.

They durability i.e. nicks etc, could be circumvented by using an exterior neoprene bootie, perhaps. I'd love to hear if maybe there is a way to keep them from becoming sticky after using them...

coylifut
01-13-2015, 09:05 PM
I live in Portland. It rains here.

when I know I'll be riding multiple hours in the rain, or when I commute to work and want not to put my foot in a wet shoe afterwards, I use these.

http://www.competitivecyclist.com/gore-bike-wear-race-power-overshoe

I use the thermo ones over road shoes and the non thermo over winter cycling shoes or mountain bike shoes. I put tights over the ankles to avoid water coming in from the top.

I walk a couple blocks from where I park the bike and they've held up multiple winters. Also, they are velcro backed, so no zipper failures. I like the various Endura options as well, but I've had trouble with the zippers.

All overshoes allow water to infiltrate from the bottom. When it's below 40, very wet and I know I'll be out for more than 3 hours, I confess to still using plastic shopping bags. no one ever quit a winter ride in the rain because their feet were too warm.