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morrisericd
10-01-2014, 07:03 AM
I'm looking to add a carbon fork to a carbon cross frame (Bailey) I bought in the classifieds section. I can't afford an Enve or even a Whiskey but there are a few out there at the second tier price that are intriguing. I once had a Nashbar ($129) on a steel bike that was heavy but seemed well made and similar (very) to the Ritchey and others. Carver makes a full carbon cross fork ($199). I talked to a knowledgable guy at Bikeman that was pretty enthusiastic about it. I'm also open to used forks but they need a pretty long steerer (XL bike - maybe 10"). Anyone have any positive experiences with the Carvers and Nashbars of the carbon fork world? Appreciate the input - thanks!

buldogge
10-01-2014, 09:25 AM
Buy this one:

http://www.blingbikekit.com/kinesis-pure-cx-cyclo-cross-forks?language=en&currency=USD&gclid=COHOysjGi8ECFVFgMgoduRYAcg

Reasonably light…rides great…has fender eyelets and bolt hole, if needed.

-Mark in St. Louis

Corso
10-01-2014, 09:26 AM
I have the Carver with alum steerer (canti’s), I think I paid around $100 last winter (budget build)… I like it. Not super light, but neither am I. But much lighter than the Surly it replaced,

Quality is decent, it works for me.

Only complaint is tire clearance. The photo show a 32 in there, and I can run a Clement USH 35, but nothing larger. (Surly Cross check had MUCHO room).

BUT, the all-carbon model appears to have more clearance in comparison.

Bikeman folks are great. I’ve been buying from them for years, and never had an issue. Hope this helps.

pdmtong
10-01-2014, 10:38 AM
If the frame is one yiu are happy with I would suggest buying the fork you want and find a way to save money to get it

You could buy the nashbar but don't do so figuring on upgrading it. That will be a money losing deal since resale is zero and now you are back to buying the fork you originally wanted which is in total a more expensive path than just buying the enve right now

ultraman6970
10-01-2014, 10:44 AM
You need to try to find the old winwood carbon one, that one came ready for any type of brake system, calipers, cantis and iso discs, and even more.. it came with aluminum steering.

I know who has one, used maybe 3 or 4 times, pretty much is new. If you want the contact info let me know.

bobswire
10-01-2014, 10:53 AM
This Ritchey is a good deal, uncut steerer. http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ritchey-WCS-Cyclocross-700cx48mm-Carbon-Fork-FULL-CARBON-/171478449235?pt=US_Forks&hash=item27ece97c53

Wound Up.... http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wound-Up-Team-X-Cyclocross-Bike-Fork-700c-1-1-8-Cantilever-Carbon-Road/381005293805?_trksid=p2047675.c100005.m1851&_trkparms=aid%3D222007%26algo%3DSIC.MBE%26ao%3D1%2 6asc%3D20131003132420%26meid%3D0b6bddc57ec944c896b d0b1714c4c1a7%26pid%3D100005%26prg%3D2013100313242 0%26rk%3D4%26rkt%3D6%26sd%3D171478449235&rt=nc

ceolwulf
10-01-2014, 11:19 AM
I had an Airborne Aileron on my fixed gear. That was a very good fork if you can find one. Both disc and canti mounts. I think it was a rebranded something else but can't recall what.

staggerwing
10-01-2014, 11:39 AM
Bought a pulled demo Ritchey Comp off of that evilBay site for what you are talking about with the Nashbar. Fender eyelets were a requirement for the commuter rig I was building up.

Appears to be well made and plenty of clearance for my 32 Randoneur Hypers with fenders. A few rides in and my main observation is it's stiff; far stiffer than the Waterford steel fork I had on my Gunnar Crosshairs. Should note, right at the clyde boundary, I'm not a skinny guy either.

FWIW, the Comp is 650g, with aluminum steerer and 391mm axel to crown. The far more expensive WCS is 475g, with carbon steerer and 400mm axel to crown. Both are listed as 45mm rake.

PS Nice deal on that posted WCS from what appears to be a reputable seller. Would be far easier to move in the future too, should it not meet needs.

morrisericd
10-01-2014, 11:48 AM
Wow - thanks for all of the help. I've been looking through eBay but somehow missed both the Ritchey and the Wound Up. I'm going for the Ritchey. I'll post pictures of my winter build when I get it together.

bobswire
10-01-2014, 11:51 AM
Wow - thanks for all of the help. I've been looking through eBay but somehow missed both the Ritchey and the Wound Up. I'm going for the Ritchey. I'll post pictures of my winter build when I get it together.

Good, after finding it I almost bought it myself even though I didn't need it. :)

zennmotion
10-01-2014, 05:03 PM
Looks like I'm too late, but one potential issue with the Ritchey WCS is the lack of a hole drilled through the crown to mount a cable hanger. This may be an issue if you're planning to use cantilever brakes, the crown-mounted hanger is a nice feature to minimize front brake shudder. The Ritchey comp fork has the hole (and fender eyelets as well). I use both of these forks on two cross bikes and like them very much. The Comp is stiffer than the WCS, and paradoxically it's stiff enough that I don't have shudder issues with my wide-stance Tektro cantis, so I haven't bothered with the crown-mount hanger even though I could add one. The same Tektro CR-720 brakes with the WCS require more careful setup to avoid shudder, and I wish I could use a crown-mounted hanger- not a big issue but if I ever need to replace it, I'll just get the Comp next time.

eBAUMANN
10-01-2014, 05:06 PM
Looks like I'm too late, but one potential issue with the Ritchey WCS is the lack of a hole drilled through the crown to mount a cable hanger. This may be an issue if you're planning to use cantilever brakes, the crown-mounted hanger is a nice feature to minimize front brake shudder. The Ritchey comp fork has the hole (and fender eyelets as well). I use both of these forks on two cross bikes and like them very much. The Comp is stiffer than the WCS, and paradoxically it's stiff enough that I don't have shudder issues with my wide-stance Tektro cantis. The same brakes with the WCS require more careful setup to avoid shudder, and I wish I could use a crown-mounted hanger- not a big issue but if I ever need to replace it, I'll just get the Comp next time.

why not just get trp 8.4's or paul mini motos? better braking and no shudder at all, for less than the cost of a new fork. just a thought...

mtechnica
10-01-2014, 05:24 PM
The columbus tusk is good and 8.4's are good. Shudder is because canti brakes use a straddle cable and when the fork flexes it de-tensions the cable which cause less braking force and eventually turns to shudder, so just use mini-v brakes.

pakora
10-01-2014, 08:20 PM
I'm looking for deals on road forks and whenever I search for the Ritcheys lately I see deals on WCS cross forks.

Almost want to run a road bike with a front canti for the price :eek:

Re: the Nashbar fork, I have not used one, but recently in a shop I was looking at a generic fork and a Ritchey Pro side by side, and the Ritchey was not only much lighter (alloy vs carbon steerer), but more confidence inspiring in that it's finishing was immaculate. It made me decide to not go generic on my project.

morrisericd
10-01-2014, 08:20 PM
You guys read my mind. On to the brake selection...

I have TRP 8.4's on my cross bike (just did my first cross race tonight - wicked awesome!) and they're pretty sweet. I did have an issue at the Vermont Overland Race with stopping power but that race is not your standard cross race - it features long unimproved "roads" (more like jeep trails) and I was having issues stopping on the longer descents. I added some problem solvers and problem solved.

I was thinking the same TRP's for this bike. It's going to be more of a snowy road studded tire kind of bike. As an aside I've never been happier on a bike than riding on dirt roads covered in snow and ice in the dark (with a headlight) as the snow falls.

I think they'll be enough clearance for snow and ice and slush but I was thinking about using canti's. Any thoughts? I built up a cross bike for my wife with some high end euro-x (?) magnesium canti's and they seem nice but in the few rides I've done with her noticed the shudder. Good clearance, bad shudder. Mini-V's - not so great clearance, no shudder.

ceolwulf
10-01-2014, 09:59 PM
I have Avid Shorty Ultimates on my Masi and highly recommend them, great power and modulation, no shudder at all, very rarely a bit of a squeal just to remind you they're cantis.

mtechnica
10-01-2014, 11:33 PM
I don't know why people say the mini v's don't have enough clearance, I've never had a problem anyway

mtechnica
10-01-2014, 11:35 PM
Also if you're cool and have a singlespeed cross bike, full sized V brakes become an option and then you won't have to worry about clearance or stopping power ever again... Having said that the 8.4's are as powerful as full sized V brakes IMHO

chriscap
10-02-2014, 12:12 AM
Another vote for Shorty Ultimates. I've got mine mounted on a Ritchey Comp in the "wide" stance (narrow in the back) and I find that they provide great stopping power with all the clearance I need.

dhalbrook
10-02-2014, 01:50 AM
I've seen a number of secondhand Alpha Q cross forks for sale for under $200. Just sayin'

pakora
10-02-2014, 08:25 AM
Shudder was a problem on my bike and it wasn't corrected by changing brakes or pads, but making the cable hanger as low as possible - in this case by using a fork crown mounted cable stop (the same used in the olden days on a mtb suspension fork pre vee brakes). My teammate's Stevens came with one stock, and I have seen another recent bike (Fuji? Focus?) with them on the stock setup.

http://cdn3.volusion.com/ctxtv.wmppt/v/vspfiles/photos/ca15089-2.jpg?1400762309

If I were building up a bike now and not using discs, I'd absolutely go mini-v, or like someone said, XT or XTR V brakes if I wasn't using integrated road shifters, just because I suck at adjusting them, while good v brakes are as powerful and modulate as well as cable discs (or better).

zachateseveryth
10-02-2014, 09:10 AM
I don't know why people say the mini v's don't have enough clearance, I've never had a problem anyway

Because they don't have enough clearance for really muddy conditions. I managed to wear out a set of rims in a single season when I ran mini-v's.

Corso
10-02-2014, 09:15 AM
You guys read my mind. On to the brake selection...

I have TRP 8.4's on my cross bike (just did my first cross race tonight - wicked awesome!) and they're pretty sweet. I did have an issue at the Vermont Overland Race with stopping power but that race is not your standard cross race - it features long unimproved "roads" (more like jeep trails) and I was having issues stopping on the longer descents. I added some problem solvers and problem solved.

I built up a cross bike for my wife with some high end euro-x (?) magnesium canti's and they seem nice but in the few rides I've done with her noticed the shudder. Good clearance, bad shudder. Mini-V's - not so great clearance, no shudder.

I have TRP euro’s on my bike (see earlier photo) and while fine for cross, they did not inspire confidence on the long high speed decents of the R2D2 ride… mini-V’s are on my upgrade list for next year’s ride. By the way, I do not have a shudder issue with the Carver-Alum steerer fork.

If you’re building a snow bike, I’d stay with the mini-vs. Shudder issue aside, V’s seem more powerful.

Lewis Moon
10-02-2014, 09:25 AM
Because they don't have enough clearance for really muddy conditions. I managed to wear out a set of rims in a single season when I ran mini-v's.

Really, it comes down to whether you ride dry races (I live in AZ) or ride in pig slop. My 8.4s are wonderful, save for modulation issues. They seem to increase breaking power at an exponential rate as the lever is squeezed. You need to watch it. I may replace the cable housing with "compressionless" and go with harder pads to try to fix the modulation issue.
I've been through three different sets of Cantis and I still can't get any to work well. Pauls, TRPs...whatever. I read every set up FAQ I could find...I still couldn't get them to stop well.

I guess there's a reason for this T-shirt:
http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-IaZo3cxju14/UItKMQF8vnI/AAAAAAAAFWQ/p_dvq9Sf7TM/s1600/Can%2527t+Stop.jpg

bobswire
10-02-2014, 09:34 AM
Shudder was a problem on my bike and it wasn't corrected by changing brakes or pads, but making the cable hanger as low as possible - in this case by using a fork crown mounted cable stop (the same used in the olden days on a mtb suspension fork pre vee brakes). My teammate's Stevens came with one stock, and I have seen another recent bike (Fuji? Focus?) with them on the stock setup.

http://cdn3.volusion.com/ctxtv.wmppt/v/vspfiles/photos/ca15089-2.jpg?1400762309



This is my experience also using a cable hanger off the fork on a couple of bikes though I recently purchased a set of Tektro RX 5 mini v's to try out.

http://i61.tinypic.com/2n894xe.jpg

http://i60.tinypic.com/157ocr5.jpg