PDA

View Full Version : Replacement fork suggestions (EC90slx?)


mhespenheide
08-20-2014, 02:50 PM
Hi all,

I'm in the market for a replacement fork for my old-ish Lemond Victoire Ti bike. It's 1 and 1/8th inch, 43mm rake -- pretty standard. I'd bought a NOS Easton EC90slx off eBay thinking that it would be a nice upgrade. I brought it in to my local (good but retrogrouchy) bike shop, and [1] they're down on CF in general, claiming that the crappy local roads beat it up and it brakes and then [2] internet searches for reviews of the EC90slx say that it has a 165# rider limit. I'm relatively skinny but tall and 178#.

Any feedback on the Easton fork before I have them put it on?

Or what replacement fork should I go for, assuming I'm on a budget? Clearance for 28's would be nice...

Thanks!

hida yanra
08-20-2014, 03:02 PM
oh good lord- just use the darn fork.

it'll be more than fine.

batman1425
08-20-2014, 03:10 PM
The ec90slx is a bit flexy compared to other current aftermarket fork options but will be just fine for you to use. Tell the shop guys to shut up and install what they sold you.

sandyrs
08-20-2014, 03:25 PM
What shop can still afford to scoff at carbon forks?

tv_vt
08-20-2014, 03:45 PM
Well, I'd be a little hesitant to use it if you're 178 and there's a 165# weight limit on it. Lots of other choices out there in that rake. Re-sell it and get something w/o the weight limit atmo.

hida yanra
08-20-2014, 03:48 PM
The ec90slx is a bit flexy compared to other current aftermarket fork options but will be just fine for you to use. Tell the shop guys to shut up and install what they sold you.

I'm confident that the issue is "stuck in 20 years ago" shop schmucks in fact DIDN'T sell him the fork, and are meaningfully incentivized to claim that steel is better, and then sell him just such a thing.

batman1425
08-20-2014, 03:56 PM
ah, yea re-read the original post and see he got it on ebay. I still think it would be ok to ride. A SLX wouldn't be my first choice for the application, but I think it will do the job just fine. LBS's with attitude like that can get bent.

BLD 25
08-20-2014, 05:22 PM
Isn't the ec90 sl a little bit more robust option? It might not have such a small weight limit

brockd15
08-20-2014, 05:24 PM
Maybe somebody knows more definitively, but I've heard that there's not a weight limit on the SLX.

mhespenheide
08-20-2014, 08:37 PM
The guys at the LBS seem opinionated about carbon, but also seem to be really excellent mechanics. I only moved here a year ago, so I haven't used them much yet. They're definitely retrogrouchy, though.

I can't find a definitive answer on a weight limit. If there is one, and I'm over it, I shouldn't use it.

I'm just wondering if there's a consensus about a budget- or mid-level option for a relatively lightweight carbon fork. If so, if there's a clear recommendation, I'd be happy to turn around and re-sell the EC90slx and pick that option up instead.

Ken Robb
08-20-2014, 08:47 PM
I don't give my $$ to any grouches retro or otherwise.

tv_vt
08-20-2014, 09:57 PM
I'm just wondering if there's a consensus about a budget- or mid-level option for a relatively lightweight carbon fork. If so, if there's a clear recommendation, I'd be happy to turn around and re-sell the EC90slx and pick that option up instead.

I've got a Kestrel OS lying around that you could have cheap if you're interested in another option. 43mm rake. Aluminum steerer, though (about 280mm long).

odin99
08-20-2014, 11:50 PM
were the easton ec90 aero forks any better?

Louis
08-20-2014, 11:57 PM
How in the world can any sane LBS be down on CF forks for road bikes?

Other than folks who go out of their way to buy frames with steel forks, nearly every new bike sold today has a CF fork. More than that, nearly every bike on the road today has a CF fork.

Unless we're talking about a boutique steel bike or a classic steel bike, I would walk out laughing of any LBS that tried to tell me that a CF fork was not appropriate for a modern frame.

rustychisel
08-21-2014, 12:14 AM
how in the world can any sane lbs be down on cf forks for road bikes?

Other than folks who go out of their way to buy frames with steel forks, nearly every new bike sold today has a cf fork. More than that, nearly every bike on the road today has a cf fork.

Unless we're talking about a boutique steel bike or a classic steel bike, i would walk out laughing of any lbs that tried to tell me that a cf fork was not appropriate for a modern frame.


+ 1

Scooper
08-21-2014, 12:24 AM
Nashbar? It's on sale for $99 and has good reviews.

43mm rake and 370mm crown to axle. The 1-1/8" version weighs 606g. 300mm alloy steerer.

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_174979_-1___204715

happycampyer
08-21-2014, 09:35 AM
There was a time in the last decade when ultra-light, sub-300 gram forks were all the rage from the major manufacturers. Easton with the SLX, which they no longer offer, Reynolds with the Ouzo Pro UL, and Alpha-Q had one, too. I suppose the Enve 1.0 is in the same tradition. I had an SLX at one point that I bought new, and I don't recall (but don't think) that the installation instructions or Easton's website at the time mentioned a weight limit. It was pretty well understood though that these super lightweight forks were not recommended for heavier riders, and that's still the case with the Enve 1.0. On top of that, Easton forks in general have a reputation for not being the stiffest forks out there—I vaguely recall in a Zinn Q&A that the rep for Easton himself recommended the Ouzo Pro for heavier riders.

The fork would probably be fine, but there are better options out there, especially if you are willing to buy a used fork.

Edit: found the Q&A I was thinking of:

http://velonews.competitor.com/2002/12/bikes-and-tech/technical-faq/technical-qa-with-lennard-zinn-carbon-forks-2_3270

The Q&A is from 2002, so take that with a grain of salt, but I think the responses are enlightening nonetheless.

mhespenheide
08-21-2014, 10:34 AM
Thanks for that, Happy. Interesting that the Easton rep recommended his competitor's product.

If it matters, the previous fork was a Alpha-Q sub-3 and I had no issues with it. It had picked up some deeper scratches before I bought the bike and I rode it with them for a few years, but I thought it was time to play it safe and replace the fork...

eippo1
08-21-2014, 10:46 AM
That shop's position is hilarious. You'll be fine on the SLX - it won't break, but it won't be the most solid ride up front. I've ridden 2 SL's on 2 different bikes and both had a little bit of give for my (at the time 190#). I swapped out one for a Ritchey WCS fork and it changed the ride to a much more solid, confident ride.

The SLX will probably feel somewhat soft and flexy especially when railing turns, but it's not gonna fail on you.

R2D2
08-21-2014, 02:32 PM
Hi all,

I'm in the market for a replacement fork for my old-ish Lemond Victoire Ti bike. It's 1 and 1/8th inch, 43mm rake -- pretty standard. I'd bought a NOS Easton EC90slx off eBay thinking that it would be a nice upgrade. I brought it in to my local (good but retrogrouchy) bike shop, and [1] they're down on CF in general, claiming that the crappy local roads beat it up and it brakes and then [2] internet searches for reviews of the EC90slx say that it has a 165# rider limit. I'm relatively skinny but tall and 178#.

Any feedback on the Easton fork before I have them put it on?

Or what replacement fork should I go for, assuming I'm on a budget? Clearance for 28's would be nice...

Thanks!

I've never heard of a 165 weight limit on the SLX fork.
They came standard on the BMC SLC01 ProMachine.
I've ridden one for years with no issues.
Never seen any broken ones.
At 178 I wouldn't have any worries about it.
Some claim it's not stiff enough.

Dead Man
08-21-2014, 04:15 PM
What exactly is the drawback of flexy forks? Paint me a picture - what am I doing and how is my ride negatively affected?

batman1425
08-21-2014, 04:22 PM
Flexing that occurs under hard braking and turning loads effectively changes steering geometry which alters handling characteristics of the bike during the turn. The harder you turn/brake, the more it flexes, the more the handling changes. The sensation can be very unnerving. People will often describe the feeling as unpredictable, or vague steering.

The more your fork flexes the more you will experience these issues.

red7
08-21-2014, 04:29 PM
I had an SLX on my Seven and even though I am light (>130lbs) I found it flexy--something I realized after riding some of the new carbon bikes. I replaced it with an Enve 2.0. Along with Hed Belgiums, it's made the front end stiffer. Recommend that fork with no reservations.

red7
08-21-2014, 04:31 PM
Also, the Enve 2.0 has clearance for larger volume tires. Upto 28mm in most brands.

mhespenheide
08-21-2014, 11:53 PM
Also, the Enve 2.0 has clearance for larger volume tires. Upto 28mm in most brands.

Wish I could afford an Enve 2.0; perhaps if I don't buy any other bike parts for a few months...

Louis
08-22-2014, 12:28 AM
Wish I could afford an Enve 2.0; perhaps if I don't buy any other bike parts for a few months...

Use what you have now and start saving. In a while decide if you like the current fork or not, then act accordingly.

jamesau
08-22-2014, 06:03 AM
What exactly is the drawback of flexy forks? Paint me a picture - what am I doing and how is my ride negatively affected?

I (195 pounds) went from an all-carbon Easton SL (stiffer than SLX) to an Enve 2.0 on the same bike; the forks have the same offset and axle-to-crown dimension.
Cornering is so much more precise on the Enve, especially on bumpy corners. Basically, the Enve takes your anticipated line precisely and with no drama. With the Easton, the fork couldn't simply hold the line you commanded it to; it would seem you'd want more room and less speed to make the same corner comfortably.