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View Full Version : 11spd crankset w/10spd drive train?


krhea
12-20-2013, 02:19 AM
Apologies if this has been covered in the past. I did a couple forum searches and couldn't find the answer I needed.

I'd like to run a Campy 11spd crankset with a Chorus 10speed drive train. Issues? Run an 11spd chain I presume?

All help appreciated.

Thanks
KRhea

bicimechanic
12-20-2013, 04:24 AM
11 speed crank will work fine. But use a 10 speed chain. Match the chain to the cassette. 10sp cassette=10sp chain.

christian
12-20-2013, 07:20 AM
Works fine. My wife has the new non-series 11-speed 165mm crank with an otherwise Chorus 10 group on her Parlee.

christian
12-20-2013, 07:24 AM
Oh yes, she runs 10-speed chain.

thwart
12-20-2013, 07:41 AM
Yep, no problems… running 11 spd Athena carbon crank with an otherwise 10 spd Chorus/Record drivetrain on my Hors.

Shifts very well, even did so yesterday... on the rollers.

oldpotatoe
12-20-2013, 08:25 AM
Apologies if this has been covered in the past. I did a couple forum searches and couldn't find the answer I needed.

I'd like to run a Campy 11spd crankset with a Chorus 10speed drive train. Issues? Run an 11spd chain I presume?

All help appreciated.

Thanks
KRhea

No problem and no, use a 10s chain..match the chain to the cogset, the crank really doesn't care.

krhea
12-20-2013, 01:36 PM
Thanks everyone.

jds108
12-20-2013, 02:57 PM
If you get a little rub when in small chainring small cog combo (chain taps against big chainring) - you can add a really thin washer, 0.3mm, to space apart the chainrings.

This all may not be necessary, but I've done it on more than one bike as I'm using Campy 11spd cranks on a bike that's otherwise Shimano 10spd.

It can be a bit of a PITA to find those washers - at least those that are this thin. I think the 0.6mm thickness is commonly available via bike-related suppliers, but that's thicker than necessary for this situation. Last time I went to buy them I took all the measurements and purchased through Amazon from a non-bike related store. If you want some, I think I have some extras.

oldpotatoe
12-20-2013, 04:17 PM
If you get a little rub when in small chainring small cog combo (chain taps against big chainring) - you can add a really thin washer, 0.3mm, to space apart the chainrings.

This all may not be necessary, but I've done it on more than one bike as I'm using Campy 11spd cranks on a bike that's otherwise Shimano 10spd.

It can be a bit of a PITA to find those washers - at least those that are this thin. I think the 0.6mm thickness is commonly available via bike-related suppliers, but that's thicker than necessary for this situation. Last time I went to buy them I took all the measurements and purchased through Amazon from a non-bike related store. If you want some, I think I have some extras.

Or shift to the big ring and up a few cogs...and not ride around in small-small, wearing these very expensive chainrings out.

RacerJRP
12-20-2013, 06:02 PM
Just throwing this out there, but an 11spd chain on an other wise 10spd drivetrain may actually work better than with the "correct" 10spd chain.

;)

jds108
12-21-2013, 01:31 AM
Or shift to the big ring and up a few cogs...and not ride around in small-small, wearing these very expensive chainrings out.

Yup. 'cause nobody ever ever cross chains...

kidbill
12-21-2013, 01:41 AM
Never cross-chain even if you have the ability to.

Ralph
12-21-2013, 07:07 AM
With modern flexible narrow chains.....I think you can cross chain a lot. If I rode a typical 34-50 compact, I would probably be OK with mostly running my whole Campy 10's cassette in big ring.....and for sure 9 of the 10. For around here, I normally ride a 39-52, a fairly large gap, and usually use the big ring for 9 of the 10. Mine doesn't complain much when doing this....but I run a lot of chain. Normally will make sure my bike is set up with front rings and rear cassette so most of time I'm probably in middle 6 of cogs, which is why I don't run cassettes starting with 12, but don't mind the occasional cross chain. On a flat ride, don't mind using a 10's cassette starting with 14....for a good chainline for that ride. Cassettes easy to change.

With compacts, sometimes the chain will rub on big ring, when in small front ring and cross chained over to small rear cogs, and especially if front rings close together....such as on a 11's crankset with 10's chain and cogs. Solution is to mostly use the big ring as much as you can. Like OP says.....save those expensive fast wearing aluminum small rings.

Went for a ride recently with old buddy Jim Ingram....formerly with Campagnolo support in US, some of you probably remember him, and he got mad at me when I used the small ring....said to just use the big ring all the time except for climbing....and there was no climbing on this ride. LOL

oldpotatoe
12-21-2013, 08:31 AM
Yup. 'cause nobody ever ever cross chains...

Do whatever you wish but the chain tickling the big ring when in small cogs has been around for over a decade, since cogs went 'way out there' and chainrings got all sorts of pins and ramps. But trying to find spacers and such to eliminate this, along with perhaps creating new issues, doesn't make sense to me..just shift to the big ring, find the cog so the ratio is the same as small-small, don't wear things out and press on.

Campagnolo 11s chainrings are $75++.....