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Nooch
12-17-2013, 07:43 PM
So a quick question -- I recently moved and am much closer to the office (3 miles instead of 10). On days that I don't feel like going out and hunting out extra miles, it seems pretty silly to get fully 'kitted up' to ride three miles -- but I loathe riding to work in cotton undies -- after all, I run hot and am a sweater.

Thinking about some sort of undershort, like the Rapha Merino wool boxers (http://www.rapha.cc/merino-boxers/), the Giro Undershort (http://www.giro.com/us_en/products/men/apparel/undershort.html) or Giro bib undershort (http://www.giro.com/us_en/products/men/apparel/bib-undershort.html), or I found these from REI (http://www.rei.com/product/794383/novara-padded-cycle-boxers-mens#pr-header-back-to-top-link).

I know I'm over thinking this -- but I don't typically ride in street clothes -- haven't ridden without spandex more or less since I started riding... Anyone have any experience with any of the above? (or if the answer is HTFU, then I deserve that too!) Really, can anything with chamois be comfortable for wearing all day?

moose8
12-17-2013, 07:46 PM
Going slower can make a world of difference. When I wear a suit I take it super slow and can usually be fine at work. Some days though it's just too hot and you have to change upon arrival.

donevwil
12-17-2013, 07:50 PM
As moose wrote, going slower is the key. My commute is 4 miles. It took a while, but eventually I settled on street clothes, Keen Pedal Austin shoes and a fixed gear commuter with fenders and panniers(converted '72 Mondia). Office doesn't have a shower so minimizing/eliminating morning sweat was the most critical, fixed gear solved that or at least made it bearable on the hottest days. I do ride in a cotton T-shirt on warm days to absorb as much as possible, then change into a clean, dry shirt at work. Brooks B-17 is comfortable for me with jeans/slacks, regular road saddle did not work with jeans. TA chainguard on the Nuovo Record crank and reflector velco around my cuffs.

Admiral Ackbar
12-17-2013, 07:53 PM
you really don't think you can bare 3 miles in your regular clothes? i rarely wear my spandex/chamois, and often ride 10-20 miles in cotton briefs and athletic shorts. maybe get some seamless undies but i think you're looking into this too much.

AngryScientist
12-17-2013, 07:59 PM
ExOfficio

you're welcome.

markie
12-17-2013, 08:15 PM
When I had a 3 mile commute I wore lycra every-day. At least in part because I always ended up taking the long way on at least one of the daily trips.

A few times i did not wear lycra i got some saddle sore action. I guess I am sensitive.

Nooch
12-17-2013, 08:53 PM
ExOfficio

you're welcome.

Here I thought you'd be all for the rapha's...

Nooch
12-17-2013, 08:54 PM
you really don't think you can bare 3 miles in your regular clothes? i rarely wear my spandex/chamois, and often ride 10-20 miles in cotton briefs and athletic shorts. maybe get some seamless undies but i think you're looking into this too much.

Yeah I'm gonna go ahead and say that I've got sensitive nether regions...

rounder
12-17-2013, 08:55 PM
If you are not sure of the situation...it is always better to be overdressed than underdressed. Basic rule.

soupless
12-17-2013, 08:58 PM
do you have an upright comfy bike and a nice brooks b67?

Coluber42
12-17-2013, 09:50 PM
It might take a little getting used to, but riding 3 mi in regular street clothes should ultimately not be a big deal. Personally, my approach is that if I'm riding just to get somewhere around town, I wear my regular clothes, which means cotton boxers. If it's going to take much more than an hour, I get kitted up. But I would definitely not want to go to the trouble of changing after every three mile trip!
That probably has something to do with the fact that I was a daily commuter in regular clothes before I ever was a spandex wearing roadie. But still, I'm sure you can get used to going a few miles without needing a shower and a change.

JAGI410
12-17-2013, 09:51 PM
ExOfficio

you're welcome.

I commute in street clothes 99% of the time (2.5 miles one-way), and I've gotten used to cotton, but days I wear my ExOfficos are certainly noticed. Stock up.

jtakeda
12-17-2013, 10:14 PM
When I rode to thanksgiving dinner I did it in cotton with a wool flannel and a bag on. 15 miles or so.

You'll get used to it, wear shorts or something if you run hot and bring pants with you.

Puget Pounder
12-18-2013, 01:59 AM
+ ex officio

and a shirt change when you get to work

But at 3 miles, unless you are bombing hills, you should be able to make that work.

Fixed
12-18-2013, 04:02 AM
people ride all over the place here in everyday clothes ,,.
i like rapha pants or prana jeans for riding around town in .:)
cheers

Nooch
12-18-2013, 05:02 AM
do you have an upright comfy bike and a nice brooks b67?

No, but it was a thought (always looking for an excuse!). I commute on my crux mostly, but will also pull down the Bedford or the Pronto if I feel like it.

It's still suburban commuting -- I start out at the top of a decent hill and have to climb it on the way home..

I work in a casual environment, so I suppose I'm just looking for what to wear in general that I can get away with not changing. Just ordered a couple pair of dickies since they were cheap and durable (from what I hear) -- just want to keep my taint in check.

Also have no idea on what to wear during the winter -- do I wear my Mavic jacket or a regular jacket? (Again: totally overthinking this, I'm aware)

Ken Robb
12-18-2013, 08:48 AM
Where do you live?
It sounds to me like you might be more comfy in street clothes if you had a more upright position on the bike and a saddle suited to that position. When I rode in a more aggressive position than I do now I too really felt like I needed padded shorts. As I got older raised my bars and spent more time on a B-17 saddle I found that I was fine riding 20 miles in hiking shorts and regular boxers except on really hot days when wicking knit undies are better.

Germany_chris
12-18-2013, 09:02 AM
I souldn't get in kit to go 3 miles but thrn agsin I don't actually own kit

Sent from my newest gadget I'm either on the bike or in the Jeep

Nooch
12-18-2013, 09:12 AM
Where do you live?
It sounds to me like you might be more comfy in street clothes if you had a more upright position on the bike and a saddle suited to that position. When I rode in a more aggressive position than I do now I too really felt like I needed padded shorts. As I got older raised my bars and spent more time on a B-17 saddle I found that I was fine riding 20 miles in hiking shorts and regular boxers except on really hot days when wicking knit undies are better.

New Jersey.

I like how this went from a couple pair of underwear to a new bike, lol.

Zoodles
12-18-2013, 09:13 AM
You're overthinking it, especially if it is casual clothes.

A beater commuter, fixed or single with fenders, flat pedals and upright bars makes a world of difference and.

Just ride slow and enjoy the fact you are not in traffic

bobswire
12-18-2013, 09:22 AM
This, jeans are fine. I ride and commute and all over the city like this on cooler days,which includes a lot of climbing. Cycling doesn't have to be a hammerfest or need to wear kit for a casual ride. Most times I wear semi loose knickers.

http://i39.tinypic.com/14jrc77.jpg

Nooch
12-18-2013, 09:26 AM
This, jeans are fine. I ride and commute and all over the city like this on cooler days,which includes a lot of climbing. Cycling doesn't have to be a hammerfest or need to wear kit for a casual ride. Most times I wear semi loose knickers.

http://i39.tinypic.com/14jrc77.jpg

Something tells me chilly to you in san fran and chilly here (19 degrees this morning) are a little different :)

But yes, that should certainly work come spring/summer.. hopefully this weekend clears some of the muck off the roads and I'll start figuring this out..

Ken Robb
12-18-2013, 09:33 AM
New Jersey.

I like how this went from a couple pair of underwear to a new bike, lol.

I was able to raise my bars and swap saddles without getting a new bike but hey: any excuse for a new bike is acceptable to our group. :beer:

giverdada
12-18-2013, 09:42 AM
i also run hot with sensitive skin, and managed to reduce my commute from 8 to 1 mile. awesome move. except for that whole fewer miles thing and that whole changing thing and that threshold shift thing - at what point does one actually gear up or down for the ride? tough questions.

you definitely need a new bike.

just kidding.

i think changing out undergarments is a way to go for freshness. this was my trick, for any kind of changing for any commute distance, and adjusting how hard you're pushing it (how late you're running) can play a huge role in how much you have to sweat:

casual/work clothes on bottom
change out shirt/jacket/etc. on top - and wear whatever jacket makes you MOST VISIBLE (i ordered the yellow P.I. Phantom S.O. for just that purpose)
change out undergarments on bottom
platform pedals for work shoes, straps if riding fixed
fenders everywhere
lights everywhere

upon arrival, put bike away and give time to stop sweating.
head to washroom and take off undergarment top and undergarment bottom.
wipe down with diaper wipes/baby wipes/body wipes (think post-stage/tt in le tour, and soigneur yourself for the podium!)
put on cotton undergarments top and bottom
put on work clothes top and bottom
replace shoes
work.

i found sitting around, logging in to a computer, planning the day, whatever i could do to sweat a bit more into my riding kit helped a lot with changing into cotton work kit - i wasn't soaking that as soon as i put it on.

and don't forget to get a new bike to put that brooks and those fenders onto...

bobswire
12-18-2013, 09:46 AM
Something tells me chilly to you in san fran and chilly here (19 degrees this morning) are a little different :)


Yes,there is that. But I'm sure you heard this quote," “The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco.” :)

soupless
12-18-2013, 09:51 AM
No, but it was a thought (always looking for an excuse!). I commute on my crux mostly, but will also pull down the Bedford or the Pronto if I feel like it.

It's still suburban commuting -- I start out at the top of a decent hill and have to climb it on the way home..

I work in a casual environment, so I suppose I'm just looking for what to wear in general that I can get away with not changing. Just ordered a couple pair of dickies since they were cheap and durable (from what I hear) -- just want to keep my taint in check.

Also have no idea on what to wear during the winter -- do I wear my Mavic jacket or a regular jacket? (Again: totally overthinking this, I'm aware)

I've found that my Endura softshell cycling jacket isn't too comfortable with regular clothes underneath. I wear a big old duffle coat, sit nice and upright, and am happy as a clam. FYI, my commute is about the same distance is yours.

But then again, I ride one of these for getting to work, not a CX bike:
http://www.adelineadeline.com/media/catalog/product/f/i/file_85_137.jpg

Fixed
12-18-2013, 10:33 AM
This, jeans are fine. I ride and commute and all over the city like this on cooler days,which includes a lot of climbing. Cycling doesn't have to be a hammerfest or need to wear kit for a casual ride. Most times I wear semi loose knickers.

http://i39.tinypic.com/14jrc77.jpg
bob is cool ..
flat bar road bikes are great here ..
how about a tread on flat bar road bikes ...:)
cheers

cp43
12-18-2013, 10:53 AM
ExOfficio

you're welcome.

Along the same lines, Patagonia.

I would suggest trying the commute in what you already have though. It'll probably be fine.

Don't over think it, just ride.

Chris

leooooo
12-18-2013, 11:51 AM
Got a similar commute distance as well, 2.8 miles each way.

Wear outlier, patagonia, rapha, rei, arcteryx, smartwool stuff.
I just make sure to purchase clothing made from merino wool and quick dry materials

However panniers are most important. Nothing worse than sweat back in less than a block of riding

ceolwulf
12-18-2013, 12:16 PM
However panniers are most important. Nothing worse than sweat back in less than a block of riding


Agreed. Messenger bags are not more cool than a sweat soaked back is uncool. I should know, used one for years.

Nooch
12-19-2013, 07:14 AM
gave it a shot today in jeans and my cotton's, a craft sleeveless baselayer and my mavic inferno jacket, usual backpack, and wore my privateer's with booties. rolled the pant leg up and made sure to coast a fair bit. everything was moving along splendidly until my coffee cup ejected from my backpack side pocket.. I went back and retrieved it -- no one ran it over -- hooray.

i think this can work :) at least during the winter -- come the summer we'll see how the sweat is, but then again I'll probably go for the extended ride before work..

Germany_chris
12-19-2013, 08:28 AM
You sir need a handlebar mounted coffee cup holder

false_Aest
12-19-2013, 08:36 AM
in the summer use goldbond on your bits.

tingly + prevents swamp nuts.

moose8
12-19-2013, 09:43 AM
If you're carrying the coffee in a thermos I'd also put it in a plastic bag. No matter the thermos some jostling on the bike seems to make it leak a little in my experience. I've made a mess in my bag because of it so now I make sure the thermos is wrapped in a plastic shopping bag before putting it in the main bag.

RacerJRP
12-19-2013, 10:18 AM
Look into the PI tranfer cycling liner for your commute. Or when it is warm enough just run a MTB short with a floating liner.

sparky33
12-19-2013, 10:54 AM
For the first decades of my riding I wore something called Clothes, something my mom bought at Sears maybe. I think you can still get them NOS on eBay.

I were lycra at all times now. Rapha pajamas have an excellent chamois.
The lycra business-casual wear is splendid as well. My wife thinks my padded backside is manly so sometimes I double up on that.

Asudef
12-19-2013, 03:01 PM
I'm quite the opposite of most people here.

In the beginning/before I got serious, I was doing 60-80mi rides in regular jeans. I even did a 40mi climb+20mi descent in jeans and street clothes when all my friends were wearing lycra, it was never a problem for me but I bet I looked the noob then.

I still commute mostly in street clothes now.

Wool is my friend as well as nice base layers and Outlier pants. Most of my riding in the city is done on a flat bar roadie as well.

You can only take it so easy and will always sweat a little but having no bags on your back is huge.

I run hot as well but what I've found is a performance base + wool mid. Add on a wind layer if necessary and thats all I've ever needed in SF. I usually have a regular shirt in there too but the sweat still ends up on it.

redir
12-19-2013, 03:30 PM
This, jeans are fine. I ride and commute and all over the city like this on cooler days,which includes a lot of climbing. Cycling doesn't have to be a hammerfest or need to wear kit for a casual ride. Most times I wear semi loose knickers.

http://i39.tinypic.com/14jrc77.jpg

This photo needs a caption contest... I don't always commute in jeans but if I do it's on my flat bar road bike.

---

I don't think I would bother getting kitted up for a 3 mile ride. Just coast on the down hills and take it easy.