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msl819
12-12-2012, 02:53 PM
As some of you know I have been trying to get my fit more dialed in. I will soon go for a fit but until then it has been fun learning some of the info for myself. When I am climbing I often find myself sliding all the way to to the nose of my saddle. What does this mean? Is this an indication of a fit issue or just something that I do? Or is this normal? To me it feels like I am able to get more on top of the BB and get more power, which feels like a good thing. When crested I slide back.

MattTuck
12-12-2012, 03:00 PM
Lots of reasons to move around on the saddle. You may be changing your position relative to the bottom bracket as you suggest. You may also be changing your position on the saddle because it isn't comfortable. You may also be trying to move forward to maintain a certain grip on the handlebars without bending more at the waist or hips.


If you force yourself to climb in the same position you ride normally, what happens? Is it a lack of power that you feel? or something else?

msl819
12-12-2012, 03:05 PM
I can stay in the normal position and climb and comfort does not seem to be the issue. Climbs here are relatively short, say .5-1.0 miles. However, I "feel" like I slide forward to generate more power since the climbs are short and, for me (Not built like a climber at 6'3" 210), are taken with speed so sliding forward helps power up rather than spin. I am not the best spinner in the world when climbing. Doe this imply anything about fit? STA?

ultraman6970
12-12-2012, 03:13 PM
Many reasons for that, including bad custom, or a style. Normally climbing you move to the back because you need more crank anyways.

msl819
12-12-2012, 05:55 PM
Without seeing what is going on can you expound on some of those things that may be going on? FWIW I tend to do this on all my bikes including MTB so is this me? Is it a bad habit I need to consciously try to not do?

oliver1850
12-12-2012, 07:40 PM
I do it too, not just when climbing. I always figured I needed shorter reach, but in the Badger's book he claims that people who slide forward need to move the saddle back. Seems counterintuitive to me but maybe it helps.

rustychisel
12-12-2012, 08:02 PM
I do it too, not just when climbing. I always figured I needed shorter reach, but in the Badger's book he claims that people who slide forward need to move the saddle back. Seems counterintuitive to me but maybe it helps.

I don't think there's a right or wrong answer, really, but Hinault's comments seem to work for me.

When I was younger I adopted a very high and forward position, almost 'track on the road' stance. Nowadays I prefer the elongated 'Italian', saddle further back, lower. Plants my fat arse better for climbing, too.

Peter P.
12-12-2012, 10:31 PM
Sliding forward for seated climbs could have nothing to do with your position and something to do with your riding style.

The way some people ride (and I have ridden with such cyclists), they will approach a hill and actually increase their pace in an attempt to "beat" the hill. They are under the impression that they must maintain their flat land speed on the climb as well.

But as soon as they crest, their pace slows as if they've thrown a switch, and it is also visibly apparent in the abrupt change in position on the bike.

Some cyclists will exhibit similar extreme shifts in position if they are racing and trying to close a gap, riding at very high speeds and high rpms for short periods of time.

FlashUNC
12-12-2012, 10:45 PM
So you're just on the rivet.

Nothing new or worrying about that.

MattTuck
12-12-2012, 10:50 PM
http://images31.fotki.com/v1093/photos/1/1292031/5971541/eTirrenoAdriaticost5Sirotti018-vi.jpg


If you are doing this regularly, I suspect that you and Bob Dole may have something in common. I'd see what your fitter says and hope you can find a more natural position that feels comfortable.

oliver1850
12-12-2012, 11:11 PM
Sliding forward for seated climbs could have nothing to do with your position and something to do with your riding style.

The way some people ride (and I have ridden with such cyclists), they will approach a hill and actually increase their pace in an attempt to "beat" the hill. They are under the impression that they must maintain their flat land speed on the climb as well.

But as soon as they crest, their pace slows as if they've thrown a switch, and it is also visibly apparent in the abrupt change in position on the bike.

Some cyclists will exhibit similar extreme shifts in position if they are racing and trying to close a gap, riding at very high speeds and high rpms for short periods of time.

This sounds right to me. Perhaps it is a matter of trying to get more upright for better breathing when you are working hard.