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johnmdesigner
12-11-2012, 09:33 PM
Just spent 2 hours (and ruined 3 tubes) trying to mount a Pro 4 Race on Easton rims. I ended up throwing the tire out the window so if you are in need come up to Harlem and pick it up.
Plastic tire irons are no match for this brute. And not long enough for any leverage.
Can anyone recommend a stout lever with extra length?

Thanks.

(I've even tried the oyster shucking knife)

AngryScientist
12-11-2012, 09:36 PM
downhill tire lever mate.

i use this bad boy with the most stubborn tires.



http://www.singletrackworld.com/files/2009/11/IMG_3426.JPG

hockeybike
12-11-2012, 09:43 PM
I'm a big big fan of this tool:

http://www.treefortbikes.com/product/333222357812/694/Kool-Stop-Tire-Bead-Jack.html?gclid=CO2qmoXsk7QCFUWo4Aoda20A0w

Makes mounting any tire on campy neutrons a cinch. Seriously. Best 10 bucks you'll ever spend. Well, on a bike, at least.

johnmdesigner
12-11-2012, 09:50 PM
downhill tire lever mate.

i use this bad boy with the most stubborn tires.



http://www.singletrackworld.com/files/2009/11/IMG_3426.JPG

That will make a great "spoon" for the post ride party.

AngryScientist
12-11-2012, 10:02 PM
That will make a great "spoon" for the post ride party.

you know how to roll john...

http://blog.wipetheworldsass.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/advert_cocaineCowboysa.jpg

DHallerman
12-11-2012, 10:10 PM
Just spent 2 hours (and ruined 3 tubes) trying to mount a Pro 4 Race on Easton rims. I ended up throwing the tire out the window so if you are in need come up to Harlem and pick it up.
Plastic tire irons are no match for this brute. And not long enough for any leverage.
Can anyone recommend a stout lever with extra length?


Yes, John, but if the fit is so tight, what do you do if -- and I don't wish this on you -- you get a flat somewhere in the wilds of Bergen County?

If it's so fracking hard to get the tire on at home, how hard will it be on the side of the road to get the tire off to replace/repair the tube, and then back on again?

Really, is it the rim or the tire? Do other tires go on easily on that Easton rim? If not, sell those wheels.

Dave, who says dumb blondes never make sense which is the term he uses for things that may look good but don't operate too darn well

johnmdesigner
12-11-2012, 10:37 PM
Yes, John, but if the fit is so tight, what do you do if -- and I don't wish this on you -- you get a flat somewhere in the wilds of Bergen County?

If it's so fracking hard to get the tire on at home, how hard will it be on the side of the road to get the tire off to replace/repair the tube, and then back on again?

Really, is it the rim or the tire? Do other tires go on easily on that Easton rim? If not, sell those wheels.

Dave, who says dumb blondes never make sense which is the term he uses for things that may look good but don't operate too darn well

Dave you are of course wise.
I had a little trouble with these rims with Pro Race 3 but not this bad.
Freezing cold and a flat tire usually gets my blood pressure up enough that I'll chew it off the rim if I have to.
Maybe its a bum tire.
My fingers are bleeding and I'm too tired to try it on another rim.
Prolly just throw the rim out the window too.:p

johnmdesigner
12-11-2012, 10:46 PM
French Tires
Asian Rims
New York nitwit installer

The world in a nutshell.

tiretrax
12-11-2012, 11:29 PM
Did you try stretching it?

I had some Easton wheels for a few months. After the third spoke broke, I got rid of them. I had forgotten the difficulty of mounting tires on them. Glad they are gone.

pdmtong
12-11-2012, 11:44 PM
Dave you are of course wise.
I had a little trouble with these rims with Pro Race 3 but not this bad.
Freezing cold and a flat tire usually gets my blood pressure up enough that I'll chew it off the rim if I have to.
Maybe its a bum tire.
My fingers are bleeding and I'm too tired to try it on another rim.
Prolly just throw the rim out the window too.:p

In my experience, the initially difficult tire becomes less an issue once on the wheel and inflated for some period of time.

when plastic doesnt work, I suggest lezyne alloy or the park tool lever

the lezyne you can carry on the road - the park not so much
http://www.lezyne.com/products/tire-repair/tire-levers#!alloy-levers

Epicus07
12-11-2012, 11:48 PM
I'll have to pick up one of those Pedros levers. I've snapped quite a few of the plastic variety in my day.

bironi
12-12-2012, 12:15 AM
I purchase rims and tires as a match. My preference is by hands only, and as a second the more pointy plastic levers. The more ****ty the local weather, the more I recommend this approach.

GRAVELBIKE
12-12-2012, 12:21 AM
Pedros levers work really well. Small, strong, and they work really well.

Some tips for mounting stubborn tires:

Wear thin mechanic-style gloves for better grip and hand protection
Lube the beads with soapy water or rubbing alcohol
Don't try to push the bead on/over with your thumbs, use your palms/heels of your hands (gloves help here)
Warm the tire to improve flexibility (blowdryer, etc)

buldogge
12-12-2012, 12:43 AM
Park, Lezyne, or Origin-8 steel-cored/nylon coated levers.

Put the tire in the dryer for a few minutes just before you start, as well.

-Mark in St. Louis

Louis
12-12-2012, 12:52 AM
Lot of other lever ideas discussed in this thread. (http://forums.thepaceline.net/showthread.php?t=90340)

fogrider
12-12-2012, 01:53 AM
Park, Lezyne, or Origin-8 steel-cored/nylon coated levers.

Put the tire in the dryer for a few minutes just before you start, as well.

-Mark in St. Louis

I've tried steel cored levers, the're worthless! the steel may feel strong but they won't hold up to a new tight tire. I spent about 10 minutes a tire and pinched one inner-tube and worked up a nice sweat. I got these after breaking my steel core levers: http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/road-track-bike/tyre-tub-tube-spares-accs-lezyne-power-tyre-levers-1-pair/lezytyrz420
and yes, they do get easier after the tire has been on the rim and pumped up.

yetitotheheady
12-12-2012, 03:42 AM
Park, Lezyne, or Origin-8 steel-cored/nylon coated levers.

Put the tire in the dryer for a few minutes just before you start, as well.

-Mark in St. Louis

^What he said

A few companies make metal-cored/nylon coated levers. This is the only logical thing you would want to take with you on a ride anyhow. The other tools are too big.

http://www.somafab.com/archives/product/steel-core-tire-levers

http://www.parktool.com/product/steel-core-tire-levers-tl-6

cash05458
12-12-2012, 06:16 AM
I picked up a bike a few years ago that had some crappy bontrager rims on it...figured I would use them for a short while til I got some better ones...anyhow, put some new tires on them and my god was it work...couple weeks later got some new rims and took the tires off the bonts...they had stretched so much on those rims they wouldn't fit any other rim I had...a whole other bigger size...ridiculous...

jpw
12-12-2012, 07:08 AM
put the rim in the freezer and the tire in the oven - no?

cash05458
12-12-2012, 07:43 AM
you mean to shrink the tire back to a more normal size? what kind of temp do you think? don't want to cook the things...

rePhil
12-12-2012, 08:07 AM
I carry a Var bead jack style. They can be difficult to find but well worth it.

johnmdesigner
12-12-2012, 09:02 AM
Thanks everyone for the good suggestions.
Life's little mysteries always solved here!

PS: You can really freak out the old ladies in the laundry room by throwing a tire into the dryer.

CAAD
12-12-2012, 09:35 AM
The alloy levers are good for mounting. Road side removal I use plastic. They seem to slide easier. To much friction when using alloy levers to slide the bead of.

buldogge
12-12-2012, 11:52 AM
I have those as well...they work fine, but I've yet to break a steel cored lever.

-Mark

I've tried steel cored levers, the're worthless! the steel may feel strong but they won't hold up to a new tight tire. I spent about 10 minutes a tire and pinched one inner-tube and worked up a nice sweat. I got these after breaking my steel core levers: http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/road-track-bike/tyre-tub-tube-spares-accs-lezyne-power-tyre-levers-1-pair/lezytyrz420
and yes, they do get easier after the tire has been on the rim and pumped up.

buldogge
12-12-2012, 11:58 AM
I have those as well...they work fine, but I've yet to break a steel cored lever.

-Mark

I've tried steel cored levers, the're worthless! the steel may feel strong but they won't hold up to a new tight tire. I spent about 10 minutes a tire and pinched one inner-tube and worked up a nice sweat. I got these after breaking my steel core levers: http://www.ribblecycles.co.uk/sp/road-track-bike/tyre-tub-tube-spares-accs-lezyne-power-tyre-levers-1-pair/lezytyrz420
and yes, they do get easier after the tire has been on the rim and pumped up.

jpw
12-12-2012, 02:29 PM
you mean to shrink the tire back to a more normal size? what kind of temp do you think? don't want to cook the things...

I was thinking that a cooled rim will contract and a warmed tire will expand, giving that little extra play between the two.

Don't use liquid nitrogen, or a torch :-)

bluesea
12-12-2012, 02:31 PM
This is less a tool issue than a technique issue, although the thin & flat under-sided Lezyne levers rock. The Lezyne levers btw, have a cleaner tip design that is more efficient at avoiding ripping tubes.

I used Mavic OP rims for years and they were anathema to lessons learned from working with 5.50"x17" Trelleborg rear knobby tires. Basically it led to laziness when I got my Campy Neutrons, and a year of dread at the thought of tire maintenance, till a light bulb went off and I tightened up my technique. When it came time to replace rim tape I didn't even bother to look for Stan's yellow tape--Velox tape and Bob's your uncle.



- Pay attention to maintaining optimal tire I.D., by keeping the bead 180˚ from the work area as high as possible in the deepest part of the rim. The more so because on a tight tire/rim combination, the first bead snaps in place and wants to be manually relocated to ease installation.

- An adjunct to the above is to start on the second bead 180˚ from the valve.

cash05458
12-12-2012, 02:32 PM
I was thinking that a cooled rim will contract and a warmed tire will expand, giving that little extra play between the two.

Don't use liquid nitrogen, or a torch :-)

sorry, didnt mean to hijack thread...was thinking you were mentioning a way to shrink a tire that had been expanded due to too tight of a fit...twas early and hadn't enough coffee before work yet...bit slow...

DHallerman
12-12-2012, 03:34 PM
PS: You can really freak out the old ladies in the laundry room by throwing a tire into the dryer.

But the younger ladies really love it.

Especially when you first spend quality tire time with the right ones.

fogrider
12-13-2012, 01:05 AM
I have those as well...they work fine, but I've yet to break a steel cored lever.

-Mark
ok, digging through the garbage can...
107367
the steel core is really not much and the plastic never had a chance!

jtakeda
12-13-2012, 01:16 AM
Tire Bead Jack works really well. I've also heard throwing the tire in the dryer for a few seconds to loosen it up

Dromen
12-13-2012, 09:00 AM
I really hacked up my rims using Kings stainless levers. Not sure of experiences with these, but metal on metal is usually not a good thing.

In my experience, the initially difficult tire becomes less an issue once on the wheel and inflated for some period of time.

when plastic doesnt work, I suggest lezyne alloy or the park tool lever

the lezyne you can carry on the road - the park not so much
http://www.lezyne.com/products/tire-repair/tire-levers#!alloy-levers

jlwdm
12-13-2012, 04:46 PM
I bought two pair of the Lezyne levers when they first came out. Looked good but were worthless. Too short to get much of a grip on. Threw both pair away.

Jeff