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View Full Version : Bike 'cockpits'


oldpotatoe
12-08-2012, 09:09 AM
http://www.cyclingnews.com/features/photos/garmin-edge-900-gps-bike-computer-coming-in-2013

another 'TV' for your bike

Llewellyn
12-08-2012, 09:16 AM
My Cateye Strada computer gives me all the riding info I need in a "just big enough" package

AngryScientist
12-08-2012, 09:23 AM
say what you want, but my garmin 800 has really revolutionized how i ride.

i am notoriously terrible with directions. the ability to create a course i want to ride home on the computer, load it to my garmin and get turn-by-turn directions on the road is huge. previously i wasnt able to enjoy rides in new places as much as i could, i would need to devote too much concentration to where the hell i was, now - it's all right in front of me.

for cycling in new places, unfamiliar routes, etc, these things are a super help. i'm sure the 900 will improve even further.

IMO.

oldpotatoe
12-08-2012, 09:29 AM
say what you want, but my garmin 800 has really revolutionized how i ride.

i am notoriously terrible with directions. the ability to create a course i want to ride home on the computer, load it to my garmin and get turn-by-turn directions on the road is huge. previously i wasnt able to enjoy rides in new places as much as i could, i would need to devote too much concentration to where the hell i was, now - it's all right in front of me.

for cycling in new places, unfamiliar routes, etc, these things are a super help. i'm sure the 900 will improve even further.

IMO.

I agree, riding in new places, a map of some kind makes sense. But I prefer a 2 dimensional type(paper map) and a watch..maybe a cell phone in the pocket if I need it.

I donno, riding with a GPS map, takes some of the adventure out of riding, IMHO. Plus they seem huge( and expensive). Commuting in a new place is one thing, but I have gotten on the bike in places like Lavorno, Italy and Palermo, Sicily, and just 'rode on road goin north' to see where it went.

csm
12-08-2012, 09:54 AM
I have an 800. it's just a 'nother toy to me. It's fun to have and probably got me to ride more the past couple of seasons.

etu
12-08-2012, 11:00 AM
i think the wireless feature has been the most significant improvement for cyclocomputers.

used to have one with HR feature and then one with an altimeter feature.
too many buttons and information that quickly became irrevelvant.

now i just have a simple wireless version with just the basics - current speed, distance, odometer and avg speed. it actually has a second wheel function which i find annoying because i sometimes flip into wheel B and can't figure out how to get back to wheel A.

saab2000
12-08-2012, 11:03 AM
Bikes don't have cockpits. Airplanes have cockpits. Or box offices. Depends on who is flying.

gdw
12-08-2012, 11:21 AM
Have any of you ever noticed that some folks who rely heavily on these toys seem to be clueless without them? I've been on rides with several people who for some reason didn't have their GPS and were unable to remember the route they took a couple weeks earlier while using it. Same thing has happened in the car, "I'm sure we took a sideroad somewhere around here.. what time were the reservations?"

Vientomas
12-08-2012, 12:11 PM
Call me what you like, but I actually enjoy the adventure of navigating a new ride with a map, compass, and my pre-ride notes. I do take my cell phone but I don't rely on it as service and functionality diminish the farther from civilization I roam.

I will admit I have gotten lost a time or two. Once necessitating being picked up by my wife, but the "mis-adventures" always make for a good story and a laugh afterwards.

For a short period I had a simple cyclometer on my bars but I found I spent more time looking at it and pushing buttons then enjoying the ride. My bars are now free of any clutter.

fogrider
12-08-2012, 08:08 PM
for riding in new places, I check it out online and take note of the major roads and general lay of the land. then when I'm on the ground, ride where I want and see where the road takes me. with that said, I love the garmin just because it does away with all the wires, goes on any bike and I get a log of my ride. but the 900 is pretty big and I sure it won't be cheap...I'll stick with my 200.

christian
12-08-2012, 08:13 PM
I haven't ridden with a computer since 2006. I don't miss it. If I'm particularly looking to get lost, I sometimes carry a half-ripped map of northern Westchester in my jersey. Then I head for Fairfield county.

Louis
12-08-2012, 08:22 PM
another 'TV' for your bike

But does it have a HUD and HOTAS? ;)

zennmotion
12-08-2012, 08:23 PM
I agree, riding in new places, a map of some kind makes sense. But I prefer a 2 dimensional type(paper map) and a watch..maybe a cell phone in the pocket if I need it.

I donno, riding with a GPS map, takes some of the adventure out of riding, IMHO. Plus they seem huge( and expensive). Commuting in a new place is one thing, but I have gotten on the bike in places like Lavorno, Italy and Palermo, Sicily, and just 'rode on road goin north' to see where it went.

I think it depends on where you ride. I don't ride with a GPS yet, although I have occasionally used my smartphone to get me oriented. But I think I'd like a Garmin or something, the big frustration here is navigating around unpleasant or even dangerous heavy traffic roads. Peace of mind is broken when during an otherwise rural ride I'm forced onto a busy 2 lane state highway with no shoulders and 60+mph traffic. Outside the snow belt, these roads have no shoulders more often than not. GPS + maps makes it possible to avoid them. Also, during long winter rides there's nothing worse than getting lost with the temp dropping and the sun setting and you're cold and bonking.

bironi
12-08-2012, 08:34 PM
Get out there and explore. Look around at what is all around. F. the cockpit.

Liv2RideHard
12-08-2012, 08:34 PM
I am with oldpotatoe. Havent trained with a computer for years. I have no plans to mount one anytime soon either. I have ridden in Italy a lot. Not once did I rely on a computer or a phone to get me around. I just rode...and rode...and rode until I made it back. I generally have a pretty good sense of direction...though one time in the Dolomites I got a bit lost. Was ok though as the scenery was absolutely stunning.

Llewellyn
12-08-2012, 09:10 PM
While I've occasionally been tempted to take the computer off my bike one important purpose for me is for knowing at how many km's I've changed components.

For the guys who don't use a computer or Garmin etc, do you just change chains, cassettes etc when they've reached their limits and not worry about how many km's it might be since the last one was changed?

nighthawk
12-08-2012, 09:10 PM
No cockpit computers here. I plan my ride out ahead of time using ridewithgps... Then scribble down directions with a sharpie on a piece of glossy card stock (usually from a six pack)... Which I keep in my jersey and pull out when necessary. Sometimes I end up riding an alternate route (lost).. But usually works out.. And it's become a nice end of ride ritual to throw my directions away after I've ridden the route. I like to keep it simple.

shovelhd
12-08-2012, 09:19 PM
My 800 is an indispensable training tool. It is not a toy. But I don't need a cockpit.

Louis
12-08-2012, 09:22 PM
IMO the need for live electronic maps on the bike is way overblown. Besides, exploring the unknown a bit is fun and new routes where you don't know what to expect around the next corner can be a thrill. Most of my rides are on familiar ground, but pushing the envelope is no big deal.

If I'm planning on checking out a completely new area (either from home or driving to the start) I just check it out on Google Maps, and if it's really complicated I print out something, put it in a zip-lock bag and stick it in a jersey pocket. That's the extent of my cycling map use. YMMV

christian
12-08-2012, 10:43 PM
For the guys who don't use a computer or Garmin etc, do you just change chains, cassettes etc when they've reached their limits and not worry about how many km's it might be since the last one was changed?I track how many hours per week I ride; it's pretty easy to estimate mileage for component wear from that.

christian
12-08-2012, 10:44 PM
My 800 is an indispensable training tool. It is not a toy. But I don't need a cockpit.Given your results, I'm not going to argue, but I assume you're using it as the head unit for a powermeter?

shovelhd
12-09-2012, 06:44 AM
Given your results, I'm not going to argue, but I assume you're using it as the head unit for a powermeter?

Yes, plus HRM and cadence. All three are important. I also have a screen for commuting or long rides that has temperature and heading, and a "recovery day" screen that has TSS. I don't use the maps that often, but where they help is when I am off my planned route, trying a new road, but I want to be sure I know where it goes because I only have so much time on the bike, and turning around is just not acceptable.

Thanks.

palincss
12-09-2012, 08:48 AM
I agree, riding in new places, a map of some kind makes sense. But I prefer a 2 dimensional type(paper map) and a watch...


One big advantage is that a GPS knows the answer to what one author of naval adventures referred to as the Navigator's Prayer: "Dear God, where am I?"

oldpotatoe
12-09-2012, 09:32 AM
But does it have a HUD and HOTAS? ;)

My bike is like the Phantom was..NO HUD, NO HOTAS..those are for nancys.

If ya can't do it with an iron gunsight, ya can't do it.

That brings up an interesting and way OT point. I learned in the pre HUD days, A-4, F-4. Even the Turkey didn't really have a true HUD...I taught some guys that came outta the F-18 how to fly the A-4 as an adversary..the lack of a HUD, with all the info 'up there' was something that took some getting used to for them. Their scan was crappy for a while. PLUS teaching them how to land by 'looking out the window', rather than relying on a FPM..in the HUD.

For the post right above. The concept of time, speed, distance for young aviators has been kinda lost also. Rely on the GPS..it'll get ya there. A lot of the flying I did around the ship was done EMCON, Emissions Control..meaning the tacan was off, no GPS..ya figured out you went that direction for that time at that speed...boat moves slowly...situational awareness.

ALL the lowlevels I flew in the F-4 and F-14 were with a chart, time, distance, heading, speed....dead reconing, meaning if ya didn't do it right, in combat, you were dead.

Had a young kid have a hard landing because he was relying on the FPM rather that just looking out the window. He was an F-14 guy, flying the F-16N.

saab2000
12-09-2012, 09:42 AM
ALL the lowlevels I flew in the F-4 and F-14 were with a chart, time, distance, heading, speed....dead reconing, meaning if ya didn't do it right, in combat, you were dead.



Makes me shudder to imagine that..... The brain had to move fast to process all the data. Our flying seems very, very simple comparatively.:eek:

GregL
12-09-2012, 09:46 AM
That brings up an interesting and way OT point. I learned in the pre HUD days, A-4, F-4. Even the Turkey didn't really have a true HUD...I taught some guys that came outta the F-18 how to fly the A-4 as an adversary..the lack of a HUD, with all the info 'up there' was something that took some getting used to for them. Their scan was crappy for a while. PLUS teaching them how to land by 'looking out the window', rather than relying on a FPM..in the HUD.
Wow, this brings back memories! Around 20+ years ago, we had a new hire join the flight department I worked for. He was a "hot shot", ring knocker, F-16 driver, fresh off active duty. He made it very clear that his new co-workers were a step below him. His first assignment was co-pilot in the JetStar II. The airplane ate him for lunch and spat out his ego. We heard he nearly fell out of the sky attempting his first steep turn during training...

Greg

Vientomas
12-09-2012, 09:49 AM
Makes me shudder to imagine that..... The brain had to move fast to process all the data. Our flying seems very, very simple comparatively.:eek:

I suspect that is why the military doesn't let just anybody fly jets. Old Potatoe must have some skills.

oldpotatoe
12-09-2012, 09:50 AM
Wow, this brings back memories! Around 20+ years ago, we had a new hire join the flight department I worked for. He was a "hot shot", ring knocker, F-16 driver, fresh off active duty. He made it very clear that his new co-workers were a step below him. His first assignment was co-pilot in the JetStar II. The airplane ate him for lunch and spat out his ego. We heard he nearly fell out of the sky attempting his first steep turn during training...

Greg

His biggest problem was his 8 years of high school, instead of the more normal HS then 4 years of a college. Yep, a slam on all ringknockers of all 3 services...

-Retired USN Phantom Phyler and NROTC grad-1972

saab2000
12-09-2012, 09:51 AM
Wow, this brings back memories! Around 20+ years ago, we had a new hire join the flight department I worked for. He was a "hot shot", ring knocker, F-16 driver, fresh off active duty. He made it very clear that his new co-workers were a step below him. His first assignment was co-pilot in the JetStar II. The airplane ate him for lunch and spat out his ego. We heard he nearly fell out of the sky attempting his first steep turn during training...

Greg

Reminds me of a story I recently heard of an F16 guy who stepped to the head of the line (as they often do) and got hired at his major, bypassing all other civilian training. First day in the sim? V1 cuts. F16 is single engine. The V1 engine failures didn't go well..... There are rudder pedals? The source of the story was his sim partner.

oldpotatoe
12-09-2012, 09:54 AM
I suspect that is why the military doesn't let just anybody fly jets. Old Potatoe must have some skills.

Just 'monkey skills'..not that hard, during the day. We earned out flight pay at night, around the ship.

For the above post..yep, the computer talked to the rudder pedals on the F-16. You used them to taxi, that was about all. If ya didn't learn to 'fly with your feet' in the F-4, F-14, A-4...you weren't getting all there was outta the jet.

Nothing like a big, slow speed, cross control in the F-4 to swap ends. And meet the guy head on after he thought he had you tree-ed when ya went nose up...

charliedid
12-09-2012, 09:57 AM
When I have to talk to people about cycloputers/GPS at work, my throat always tightens and my mouth goes dry. I'd almost rather talk about Aero Bars...:eek:

That said we always use a basic one when touring.

saab2000
12-09-2012, 10:14 AM
Back to the topic of bike GPSs, I can definitely see a use. I've been involved in some pretty rural rides in the mountains of Virginia. Getting really lost would be a real possibility. Being able to pre-program a route would seem really nice.

That said, a lot of it was wooded and I've heard numerous stories of Garmins losing signal in wooded areas and becoming useless for many minutes at a time. Defeats the purpose.

witcombusa
12-09-2012, 11:25 AM
Nothing is best :banana:

Mr Cabletwitch
12-09-2012, 11:47 AM
If I'm going on an all day route say 100-150 miles it would be nice to have a GPS to tell me where to go because once I have 80 miles in everything is auto pilot my brain shuts down and the legs take over it would be nice to have something to tell me where to go. Other than that I can't see a need for the maps, most of my rides are local, but I do really like my basic Garmin that keeps track of everything and I can upload it to the web. Hopefully I can pick up somebody's old 800

bluesea
12-09-2012, 12:28 PM
Bikes don't have cockpits. Airplanes have cockpits. Or box offices. Depends on who is flying.


Actually its a naval term from the days of sail, but I'm fine with aviation adapting the term. :)

CromoSapien
12-09-2012, 12:45 PM
Back to the topic of bike GPSs, I can definitely see a use. I've been involved in some pretty rural rides in the mountains of Virginia. Getting really lost would be a real possibility. Being able to pre-program a route would seem really nice.

That said, a lot of it was wooded and I've heard numerous stories of Garmins losing signal in wooded areas and becoming useless for many minutes at a time. Defeats the purpose.

"Pedal faster. I think I hear a banjo."

heh