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William
11-27-2012, 09:48 PM
Geekhouse Bikes has been at the front of the Paceline for a while now but its time for him to pull off and let Portland based builder Ben Farver take a pull. So, this week at the front of the Paceline: Argonaut Cycles


Argonaut is truly custom carbon, born and bred in the Pacific Northwest. We use carbon not because itís pretty, not because it makes a good story, but because it makes the best bicycles. We are driven by a singular purpose: To take your unique performance requirements and transform them into something real.
Argonaut is no stranger to steel. We were baptized in fire and flux. Ben Farver started out making steel bikes for reasons of style and beauty. Steel is and will always be the benchmark by which we judge ride quality. But just like an origami schooner will disintegrate in a storm, there are limits to what steel can offer. Dress it up in the finest accoutrement: Itís still just a series of tubes. But just as steel canít exist without carbon, you canít make carbon feel truly alive without knowing steel. We know where we came from. More importantly, we know where weíre going.
Argonaut carbon bicycles are made entirely in the United States, and for that matter entirely in the Pacific Northwest. There are 30 years of industry leading composite experience behind its construction, driven by a true passion for the sport of cycling. We make the best bicycles because we want to ride the best bicycles.

If you could examine the inside of every piece of your Argonaut you would see the same sculpted surfaces that distinguished our handcrafted steel frames. We are of the philosophy that if youíre going to go to all the trouble of making something, you might as well make it perfect.
We take as much pride in the refinement of the Argonaut frameís design as we do its performance. Just because you can mold carbon in the shape of a spaceship, it doesnít mean you should. The Argonaut frame is an exercise in restraint. Inspired by our original steel frames, we let form follow function.

http://argonautcycles.com/index.php

Argonaut Cycles Video
http://vimeo.com/48825579



Ben was kind enough to answer a list of questions for us that are a mix of standards and member contributions...plus a few off-the-wall thrown into the mix. Our hope was to convey the builders love of their craft, hard details, and offer a few questions that bring out a bit of the human element that that helps them create the works that we love. Ben is also a member of the forum so if you have additional questions you would like to ask him about his craft, please do so.


Q&A with Ben Farver:

How / why did you decide to become a frame builder?*
I grew up cycling and working in bike shops. After I got out of college I got into sculptural welding. I loved it because I love to work with my hands and it was a great creative outlet. I thought, how could I make a job out of this??? With my background in cycling, framebuilding was a great fit.


What influences the artistic side of your designs?
minimalist, modern architecture and classic bicycle design. I try to let form follow function wherever possible. To me, a fillet brazed steel road bike is perfect. Simple, elegant, timeless.

When I decided to switch to carbon I didnít want to just mimic what a steel bike looks like. Just because you can mold carbon to look like a spaceship it doesnít mean you should. I wanted my carbon frames to show intention in their design, while keeping them rooted in classic bicycle design. The tubing sizes are all determined by how each tube needs to perform. For instance with the downtube needed to have a center diameter of 45mm. Smaller and it would be too heavy or not stiff enough, bigger and it would be too stiff or not strong enough.

I then added some shape and contour to the frame to make it look more cohesive as apposed to just an assemblage of different parts.


What is your method to determine fit?
Whenever possible I bring customers here to Portland to meet with Michael Sylvester at Bicycle Fitting services. Iíve worked with him for years and he does an amazing job. Iím an expert in bicycle frame design and fabrication, not sports physiology. If a customer canít come to Portland Iíll help them find a fitter in their area who I think will do a good job.


What is it that keeps you passionate and focused?
Riding! I try to ride as much as I possibly can. It keeps my head clear and connected to the bikes Iím making. Riding bikes is my passion, making them is my job. I race CAT3 road, Single Speed and A (very middle of the pack) Cross, and last summer did the Breckenridge 100 and Mohican 100 MTB races.


When working with steel you run the risk of burns. What are the dangers of working with carbon?
With carbon, itís really important to control the dust created by cutting and sanding it. I do all of that work on a big downdraft table. The ends of the tubes can be really sharp, and you can also get carbon splinterís which really suck. Beyond that, itís pretty mellow. Definitely safer overall than working with metal.


What's your favorite beer?
Anything from Mikkeller. Their Hardcore IPA is amazing.
Boneyardís IPA is my favorite beer on tap lately, and Oskar Blues Daveís Pale Ale is my go to at the grocery store.


Heard any cool music lately?
A friend turned me on to Sun Kill Moonís album of Modest Mouse coverís recently and Iím really into that. The Dr. Dog station on Pandora is pretty cool, and Black Sabbath is my go to when I need to get crackiní!


How did you meet your spouse or significant other?
We met in Breckenridge, CO., where we were both taking a break from college to snowboard and goof off. We both then moved to San Diego, where we married, and moved north to Oregon to live closer to her family.


What's there to do for fun in your town?
Portland is a great city. Itís relatively small and pretty cheap. We used to see more music before the kiddo arrived. Now we mostly go out to eat. Portland has amazing restaurants, and most of the good ones are really reasonable. Here, if youíre paying a lot for your meal youíre probably not eating the best food the city has to offer.


Do you put ketchup on your*Frankfurter/Wiener?
mustard only, yo!


Who would you want to build a bike for you?*
Oh man! There are so many custom bikes that I would love to own. Lately Iíve been pining over this short wheelbase 29er that my buddy Sean Cheney (Vertigo Cycles) makes. I love Fireflyís Ti cross bike. A Retrotec 650B MTB would be sick. A Signal winter road bike with clearance for fenders and 32ís to run as a rain and gravel bike. A Baum Ti road bike. A Cielo stainless road bikeÖ. You can never have enough bikes!


What is it about your approach to building/designing bikes makes you unique, or separates you from the other builders out there?
I feel like I really know how a bike should handle, and more importantly, how a customer wants their bike to handle. Iíve had the privilege of working with a lot of really great clients, and one thing I have gotten good at is figuring out exactly how a customer wants to experience their bike. Iím good at understanding how customers like to ride, and making a bike based on that instead of how I think they should ride, or how they wish they could ride.
I understand ride quality, and really strive to make exceptional bikes in this regard. My primary motivation is to have someone get on one of my bikes and say,ĒHoly !@#$%!Ē If the bike doesnít do that, then whatís the point?
In terms of aesthetics, Iím also good at looking at the bike as a whole cohesive unit instead of just a frame and bunch of parts. Everything should make sense when you look at complete bike. The the size of the tubes of the frame, the geometry, the components, the amount of head tube and number of spacers under the stem Ė all of these things need to be considered to make a successful custom bicycle.


How long is your wait list?
Iím about three months out, which is a little longer than Iíd like to be. Iíd like to maintain a 6-8 week lead-time, which Iím comfortable I can get back to over the next month. Iíve been out of the shop lately doing a lot of sales and promotional stuff.


How long have you been building frames.
I started out building TIG welded steel bikes in 2007, then made lugged and fillet until about 2 years ago, and now make only custom carbon.


Do you have a favorite part of the building process?
With steel, it used to be mitering. I love working on the mill and cutting metal because itís such a precise process, which feeds my Type A-ness. With carbon, I really like the bonding process right before I put the frame in the oven. It always takes about the same amount of time, and for some reason I find it very calming.


What is the most unusual / unique bicycle you've ever built?
I built this tricycle for my nephew. The front end articulates on this giant skateboard truck, mounted upside down on the rear kick plate.

http://i1108.photobucket.com/albums/h420/SodaFuel/Tricycle.jpg


What is your favorite non-cycling obsession?
Iím a little embarrassed that I donít really have one at the moment. My life has been so cycling and kid focused over the last couple of years that there hasnít really been time for one. Beer and coffee, sure, but those arenít too unique in this circle. I am getting more into photography lately. Not my own, just admiring other peopleís work. Iíve had the opportunity lately to work with a couple guys whose pictures are really amazing. They remind me that thereís a huge difference between a well taken photograph and the random oneís I take with a point and shoot.


Toe-may-toe or Toe-mah-toe?
Toe-may-toe, Ah-loo-minum, and ĎMerica!


Many thanks to Ben for taking the time to answer our questions! Please feel free to post up any questions that you would like to ask.

William


PS: In case you missed it, the previous Builder Spotlight can be found here... (http://forums.thepaceline.net/showthread.php?t=119100)


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William
11-27-2012, 09:50 PM
:cool:

William
11-27-2012, 09:51 PM
:cool::cool:

William
11-27-2012, 09:51 PM
:cool:.:cool:

William
11-27-2012, 09:52 PM
:cool:..:cool:

William
11-27-2012, 09:53 PM
:cool:...:cool:

William
11-27-2012, 09:53 PM
:cool:....:cool:

William
11-27-2012, 09:54 PM
:cool::cool::cool:

William
11-27-2012, 09:55 PM
:cool:.:cool:.:cool:

William
11-27-2012, 09:55 PM
:cool:..:cool:..:cool:..

William
11-27-2012, 09:56 PM
:cool:..:cool:..:cool:..:cool:.

William
11-27-2012, 09:57 PM
..:cool:..:cool:.:cool:

William
11-28-2012, 07:14 AM
Ben, welcome and thank you for sharing your passion with us.

You mentioned starting frame building working in steel, starting with TIG and then adding lugged and fillet brazed bikes to your skill set. What spurred you to move to carbon fiber?

Also, just have to say, that custom tricycle is awesome!!:cool:







William

bfarver
11-28-2012, 09:10 AM
Ben, welcome and thank you for sharing your passion with us.

You mentioned starting frame building working in steel, starting with TIG and then adding lugged and fillet brazed bikes to your skill set. What spurred you to move to carbon fiber?

Also, just have to say, that custom tricycle is awesome!!:cool:
William

William - first off, thank you so much for the opportunity to participate in a Builder Spotlight.

Two equally pressing realities caused me to hang up my torch and get into composites. The custom steel business model is tough and nearly impossible to scale. At the same time, I found myself catering more to the performance side of the market, and felt I'd reached the limitation of what steel can do.

On the business side, the custom steel niche is really saturated. There must have been something in the water around 2007, because all of sudden so many of us hung a shingle and started making custom steel frames. I'm really proud of the steel bikes I've made, but ultimately under the paint, they're the same bikes that any other competent steel builder makes. We all use the same tubes, the same brass, the same gas fluxer, etc. I'm not a very good salesman, and I found myself having to do a lot of hand waving when talking to customers about my bikes and why they were better. I would talk about things like the quality of my miters and fillets, but really, those are things that should be expected. It's like saying, "my frame won't break!" and expecting that to be a selling point.

I wanted to make a bike that was different and new to the industry, and whose every aspect I could argue the value.

On the performance side, you can't deny the aptitude of carbon to make an amazing bicycle. It's so light and so strong, but at the same time flexes and if used properly retains all the positive attributes of steel.

In short, I wanted to make a better bicycle unique to my brand. I wanted to put the value of the frame in the engineering of the parts, as apposed to the assembly, so that I could profitably scale production.

William
11-28-2012, 10:41 AM
Ben, no problem. I appreciate your joining us here.

While I've got you :), I wonder if you talk to us about how you layup the Carbon fiber and join the tubes? Differences in woven fiber vs. uni-directional?





William

FlashUNC
11-28-2012, 11:02 AM
Ben, since William kicked us off on this topic, could you elaborate a bit on the transition to carbon? What was the learning curve like coming from building bikes in steel?

Being an layperson and an outsider, I'd assume some of the skills would transition -- geometry, etc, doesn't really change -- but I'd think working with carbon and molds and baking and epoxies is far different than flipping a torch around.

bfarver
11-28-2012, 11:58 AM
Ben, no problem. I appreciate your joining us here.

While I've got you :), I wonder if you talk to us about how you layup the Carbon fiber and join the tubes? Differences in woven fiber vs. uni-directional?

William

The Argonaut process is unique in that we lay pieces of pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon on a reusable latex bladder. Latex bladders provide high and consistent internal pressure pressure when the part is inside the mold, and laying up the part on the bladder as apposed to in the mold gives you a part that is as clean on the inside as it is on the outside.

106643

For each part we first determine a layup pattern, that layup pattern is then cut out on a large automated cutting machine, giving you a bunch of individual pieces as seen in the video you included in the beginning of this post. Those pieces are then wrapped around a bladder, and the bladder is placed in an aluminum clamshell mold, or "tool". The bladder is inflated to high pressure, and the tool is placed in a heat press, which compresses the tool and cures the resin by heating it to about 260 degrees F.

Carbon loves heat and pressure. The better and more consistent pressure, the better the individual plies of carbon adhere, giving you the strongest, most durable part.

As far as differences in weave vs. unidirectional, the cool thing about parts made with layered unidirectional carbon is that they can be engineered to flex differently in different directions, or are anisotropic. Being anisotropic gives you a bike that can do so many different things at once, but essentially "vertically compliant and laterally stiff." Much like steel or Ti, woven carbon is isotropic, or has uniform bending characteristics. Weave does a great job of absorbing road vibration, which is why we use it in the head tube, but can't be "tuned" in the same way as unidirectional.

bfarver
11-28-2012, 12:18 PM
Ben, since William kicked us off on this topic, could you elaborate a bit on the transition to carbon? What was the learning curve like coming from building bikes in steel?

Being an layperson and an outsider, I'd assume some of the skills would transition -- geometry, etc, doesn't really change -- but I'd think working with carbon and molds and baking and epoxies is far different than flipping a torch around.

Great question. When I decided to switch to carbon, I stopped taking steel orders and built out the remainder of my Que. I spent a good three months simply doing research, learning as much as I could about the material, and how it has evolved in the bicycle industry.

I quickly figured out a bunch of things that I couldn't, and didn't want to do. I didn't want to make carbon frames using tube-to-tube style construction. I felt like this was already being done really well by folks like Nic Crumpton and Parlee. I also saw an opportunity to do something now one had done before - make custom geometries using bladder molded frame parts, or similar to monocoque style construction. Unfortunately, the decision to pursue making frames in this style took it out of my capability to do everything in house. It simply wasn't realistic to teach myself how to make bladder molded frame parts with pre-impregnated unidirectional carbon.

So, I began looking for a provider. I talked to a ton of people in the industry and found myself in a tough spot. Anyone willing to make small quantities of specialized parts didn't have the manufacturing ability or expertise I needed, and the shops that did were to busy making stuff for Boeing to care about bike parts. Long story short, a friend in Portland put me in contact with Innovative Composite Engineering (ICE) in White Salmon, WA, about an hour east of Portland. ICE has a ton of experience in the bicycle industry. They've made tubes for just about everyone including IF, Trek, and Parlee, but were concentrating more on the more lucrative Oil/Gas and Aerospace industries.

My desire to do something new, to tackle a problem no one had solved (making bladder molded custom frames), and my concept for engineering the tooling piqued their interest. Long story short, it took us about two years, but the result is finally coming to market.

The short answer to your question is that I quickly figured out I was out of my league on my own in terms of composite engineering capability. But I brought to the table my knowledge of frame geometry, bike handling, and most importantly ride quality.

1centaur
11-28-2012, 06:41 PM
As someone with some large number of CF bikes I currently forget :), the one thing that jumps out from the OP is the discussion of steel as a benchmark of ride quality. I left steel behind when I found CF because I found CF so superior to steel in terms of its vibration damping, thus triggering my patented phrase, "metal is metal and carbon fiber isn't" since I think Ti is so close to steel it does not make much difference and alu's not that far away.

Are you chasing the ride quality of steel with your CF designs, or are you saying ride quality is all well and good but you want more than that from a bike? Because, basically, if you succeeded in making CF ride like steel, I theoretically would not like the ride of your bikes. But I highly doubt you make CF ride like steel in terms of the way vibrations pass through the frame, since I view that as an impossible engineering ask. So you must mean something different. I would guess you mean the combination of stiffness and flex, but I don't want to put words in your mouth. So could you explain how much of the steel benchmark you try to deliver via carbon fiber, and how you try to exceed the qualities of steel in carbon fiber?

Thank you.

bfarver
11-28-2012, 07:10 PM
As someone with some large number of CF bikes I currently forget :), the one thing that jumps out from the OP is the discussion of steel as a benchmark of ride quality. I left steel behind when I found CF because I found CF so superior to steel in terms of its vibration damping, thus triggering my patented phrase, "metal is metal and carbon fiber isn't" since I think Ti is so close to steel it does not make much difference and alu's not that far away.

Are you chasing the ride quality of steel with your CF designs, or are you saying ride quality is all well and good but you want more than that from a bike? Because, basically, if you succeeded in making CF ride like steel, I theoretically would not like the ride of your bikes. But I highly doubt you make CF ride like steel in terms of the way vibrations pass through the frame, since I view that as an impossible engineering ask. So you must mean something different. I would guess you mean the combination of stiffness and flex, but I don't want to put words in your mouth. So could you explain how much of the steel benchmark you try to deliver via carbon fiber, and how you try to exceed the qualities of steel in carbon fiber?

Thank you.

Great question. My primary objective was to make a better bike than I ever could with steel. However, I didn't want to start from scratch in terms of ride quality. I wanted to take all the things I love about steel bikes and apply those to a carbon frame, but improve on the things I thought steel lacked.

When I talk about steel, I'm talking about modern thin wall tubing. There's a big difference between True Temper S3 and Reynolds 753.

An S3 frame feels great on the road. It's super comfortable and has great snap. Under really high power efforts, though, I don't think it's stiff enough. I wanted to make a carbon frame that has that same snap, but under big power efforts as well, but also soaked up the road vibration (which, as you stated carbon does so well). I think of it as steel 2.0.

That's what I feel I've accomplished with the Argonaut frame. It has a dynamic ride quality that you don't find in off the shelf carbon bikes because they're all way too stiff for most people. It's also nice and light (frames weigh between 830-900 grams), and super smooth.

The cool thing about being able to do custom layups, though, is that we can make the frame as stiff or compliant as you want.

William
11-29-2012, 06:54 AM
Great answers Ben!

So, in a nut shell, when someone orders an Argonaut frame, the tubes are going to be created and tuned for each individual riders size, weight, comfort, and performance needs?





William

William
11-29-2012, 07:10 AM
For the Clydesdales out there like me....

Does the size of your tooling limit in any way the size of a frame you can create? Tube length and diameter? I know it does to a point, but what I mean is...what is the cut off point for frame size and/or rider weight that you can accommodate?








William

bfarver
11-29-2012, 04:55 PM
Great answers Ben!

So, in a nut shell, when someone orders an Argonaut frame, the tubes are going to be created and tuned for each individual riders size, weight, comfort, and performance needs?

William

Hi William, sorry it took me a bit to get to your question.

Yes, you said it perfectly!

bfarver
11-29-2012, 04:58 PM
For the Clydesdales out there like me....

Does the size of your tooling limit in any way the size of a frame you can create? Tube length and diameter? I know it does to a point, but what I mean is...what is the cut off point for frame size and/or rider weight that you can accommodate?


William

The smallest frame size we can make is a 51cm effective top tube length with a 100mm head tube. The larges size we can make is a 61cm effective top tube with a 230mm head tube. We can go 72.5 - 74.5* on both the seat tube and head tube.

There is no real limitation on rider weight. If you can turn a pedal, we can make a frame that will hold up.

FlashUNC
11-30-2012, 09:32 AM
When you're doing a custom layup, what are some of the common points where the build changes for lighter riders vs.heavier riders? Where are the some of the areas with maybe surprising similarities?

Are you adding more carbon in the BB area, for example, for us fat guys vs. the Pantani's of the world?

bfarver
11-30-2012, 02:57 PM
When you're doing a custom layup, what are some of the common points where the build changes for lighter riders vs.heavier riders? Where are the some of the areas with maybe surprising similarities?

Are you adding more carbon in the BB area, for example, for us fat guys vs. the Pantani's of the world?

The areas that make the biggest difference are the downtube and chain stays in terms of frame flex. These are the primary areas where we'll changed fiber orientation, wall thickness or number of plies, and modulus of carbon.

The top tube is one area that is pretty consistent across the board. We'll take some material out for lighter riders and add some for really big guys, but you have to make some pretty big changes to feel a difference there.

As far as the actual bottom bracket area, that's pretty consistent across the board. The layup there is more critical for supporting the bb and cranks than it is for for delivering a certain ride quality. All that stuff about BB386 and companies saying a huge BB is way stiffer is hogwash. It just allows them to be sloppier with their layup and makes the CAD work easier.

We vary the seatstays and seat mast to effect the vertical compliance of the bike based in rider weight and comfort preference.

William
11-30-2012, 03:05 PM
The smallest frame size we can make is a 51cm effective top tube length with a 100mm head tube. The larges size we can make is a 61cm effective top tube with a 230mm head tube. We can go 72.5 - 74.5* on both the seat tube and head tube.

There is no real limitation on rider weight. If you can turn a pedal, we can make a frame that will hold up.

Thanks for answering Ben.

So that range is due to tooling as opposed to straddling points on the bell curve?





William

bigbill
11-30-2012, 04:07 PM
Here is one of the last steel bikes Ben built. He was a pleasure to work with and delivered when promised. This bike has the Ti replaceable rear dropouts so if anyone has any doubts to their durability, fear not, I am bigbill, crusher of lesser and poorly engineered products and my dropouts are straight and true. I really want one of the new carbon frames, almost bad enough to sell the other steel bike in the picture to fund it.

Louis
11-30-2012, 05:15 PM
(From Ari's FS post a while back)

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f99/akelman/Argo01.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f99/akelman/Argo07.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f99/akelman/Argo04.jpg

William
12-01-2012, 07:40 AM
(From Ari's FS post a while back)

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f99/akelman/Argo01.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f99/akelman/Argo07.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f99/akelman/Argo04.jpg


I remember that bike! That made me drool a bit.;)


If Ben is carrying over that attention to detail to his new line (which I'm sure he is), there will be some fine carbon fiber Argonaut bikes tearing up the asphalt in your neighborhood soon.:cool:





William

bfarver
12-02-2012, 01:28 PM
Thanks for answering Ben.

So that range is due to tooling as opposed to straddling points on the bell curve?





William

Yes. We designed the tooling to be able to cover those sizes, which should accommodate 99% of riders.

bfarver
12-02-2012, 01:30 PM
Here is one of the last steel bikes Ben built. He was a pleasure to work with and delivered when promised. This bike has the Ti replaceable rear dropouts so if anyone has any doubts to their durability, fear not, I am bigbill, crusher of lesser and poorly engineered products and my dropouts are straight and true. I really want one of the new carbon frames, almost bad enough to sell the other steel bike in the picture to fund it.

Thanks Bill! You were a pleasure to work with and I love that bike. ArgoMax!

bfarver
12-02-2012, 01:32 PM
(From Ari's FS post a while back)

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f99/akelman/Argo01.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f99/akelman/Argo07.jpg

http://i45.photobucket.com/albums/f99/akelman/Argo04.jpg

Hi Louis. Thanks for posting those! That was a MAX single speed I built for a customer in the Tahoe area. Hand-carved chrome plated lugs - lots of love went into that frame.

Spectrum did a great job on the paint too.

slidey
12-04-2012, 02:47 AM
Hey Ben,

This is the first builder spotlight I've gone through, and I'm quite impressed at you finding success in your methodology of laying up carbon. Also, the bikes look great. Do keep us posted on pics of your latest creations.

Cheers!

William
12-04-2012, 07:51 AM
Ben,

You mentioned earlier in the Spotlight that before you found ICE, it was tough to find folks willing to work on CF bike parts since everyone was already doing work for Boeing. Since you are located in the Pacific Northwest which is a hotbed of the aviation industry, do you ever have an issue with getting a steady supply of carbon fiber due to the Boeing drain?







William

bfarver
12-04-2012, 12:28 PM
Hey Ben,

This is the first builder spotlight I've gone through, and I'm quite impressed at you finding success in your methodology of laying up carbon. Also, the bikes look great. Do keep us posted on pics of your latest creations.

Cheers!
Thanks and will do!

bfarver
12-04-2012, 12:33 PM
Ben,

You mentioned earlier in the Spotlight that before you found ICE, it was tough to find folks willing to work on CF bike parts since everyone was already doing work for Boeing. Since you are located in the Pacific Northwest which is a hotbed of the aviation industry, do you ever have an issue with getting a steady supply of carbon fiber due to the Boeing drain?

William

Not at all. ICE makes sure to maintain about a six week supply of pre-preg so as not to get pinched, but generally speaking its not a big deal, even with the new Dreamliner.

A few years ago there was a pinch around here on stainless and Ti due to Boeing, but that's about all I've heard of in regards to Boeing sucking up supply.

William
03-05-2013, 12:09 PM
From the Argonaut Cycles facebook page...

Brian Vernor did an amazing job capturing Ben's vision and passion for ride quality and life on the bike. Argonaut is excited to publicly release the book, as only a select few have physical copies.
Many thanks to Brian and David at Wilderness for helping us put this project together. We hope you enjoy it.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/glc0uzctnmvtv90/argonaut_lookbook_RND5.pdf







William

cbass
07-20-2013, 08:19 PM
Those black and blue carbon frames look slick.

William
09-16-2013, 02:47 PM
Sweet ride there Ben!!:cool:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151856665634329&set=a.10151144940179329.464128.87029479328&type=1&theater




William

William
11-21-2014, 07:55 AM
Latest ride from the Argonaut Skunkworks factory....

Pschnei3
12-02-2014, 07:13 AM
sweet ride.

jerrym
12-07-2014, 09:41 AM
Great information, Ben! I've been riding a long time, and have mostly ridden steel and titanium. The closest I have come to full carbon is a Holland Exogrid. You are now on my short list for me next custom frame!

joco
02-25-2015, 09:51 AM
Sweet ride there Ben!!:cool:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151856665634329&set=a.10151144940179329.464128.87029479328&type=1&theater




William

Love this bike!!

William
09-23-2015, 12:37 PM
Understated and cool...

kobetsang
01-07-2016, 06:50 PM
The perfect blend of left and right brain. Math and beauty

wallymann
02-02-2016, 02:52 PM
anyone know if Ben does CF without a seatmast, i.e., a normal seatpin setup?

Cameron
02-02-2016, 03:37 PM
anyone know if Ben does CF without a seatmast, i.e., a normal seatpin setup?

He did at least one for John Watson: http://theradavist.com/2014/07/argonaut-cycles-2-0-road-sram-red-22/#1


http://theradavist.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Argonaut-road-sram-red-22-20.jpg

DarrinNYC
02-18-2016, 08:23 PM
I'm beginning to feel the temptation of a carbon frame with the fiber pattern visible.

xander1027
10-26-2016, 06:46 PM
Its cool to see a builder move from steel to carbon.

j1mm82
01-18-2017, 06:19 AM
Why did Above Category drop Argonaut from there selection ?

joosttx
01-20-2017, 03:42 PM
Why did Above Category drop Argonaut from there selection ?

Probably they too long to build. When I say too long I mean normal time for a small custom builder.

KarlC
06-21-2017, 04:00 PM
Sweet ride there Ben!!:cool:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151856665634329&set=a.10151144940179329.464128.87029479328&type=1&theater




William

This is a very well balanced look, please post more photos and details when you have the time.

Thx

Tavarez
11-21-2017, 09:59 PM
This is a very well balanced look, please post more photos and details when you have the time.

Thx

Agreed!

cycle-spinner
01-27-2018, 10:17 PM
I love mine. Any recommendations needed let me know.

Mikej
01-28-2018, 07:16 AM
I love mine. Any recommendations needed let me know.

Post up some pics in the custom gallery!!