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monkeybanana86
03-11-2012, 01:40 AM
At San Francisco State I was fortunate to have been able to take a physics fabrication/shop class (I came in with zero experience). It was taught by Peter Verdone (peterverdone.com) who has been around the bike industry for many years. After the class was finished he helped me make my own bike!
I maily used BikeCad for the design. Pete did some of the drawings on SolidWorks to help me visualize the bike better (like the bent stays). Tubes were bought from Nova Cycles.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v485/jesuisyann/bikegeo.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v485/jesuisyann/bike.jpg

I hope to make a better one in the future (better welds and thinner tubes). This was an amazing experience and I hope some of you who haven't done so consider making your own bikes. My eyes really opened when learning about the process and decisions that go into making frames and now I see bikes with difference perspective. For example, I never thought I'd appreciate TIG bikes! Looking at the Firefly welds make me drool. And I also miss the smell of a metal shop as unhealthy as that sounds.

BumbleBeeDave
03-11-2012, 02:15 PM
. . . and what prompted you to enroll. Are you planning to just build for yourself, or go into business?

Do you have any photos from the class of your bike in process? I think a more complete account of your experience in the class would be something that many of our members would enjoy. I know I would! :beer:

BBD

BumbleBeeDave
03-11-2012, 02:16 PM
It looks like Mr. Verdone has a huge number of pics from this year's show here:

http://www.peterverdone.com/?p=1278

BBD

monkeybanana86
03-11-2012, 03:04 PM
. . . and what prompted you to enroll. Are you planning to just build for yourself, or go into business?

Do you have any photos from the class of your bike in process? I think a more complete account of your experience in the class would be something that many of our members would enjoy. I know I would! :beer:

BBD


Even though this was a class for making scientific apparatus I mainly took this course because I knew Pete made bikes and I've always wanted to do that. And also I wanted to use my hands for something besides homework.

Unfortunately I didn't have a digital camera handy and my cell phone pictures don't show much (I'm still beating myself up for it). For those of you interested you should check out Pete's wiki you'll find diagrams and great information on construction all for free! He's super generous that way.

As for future plans, if I can find a good shop I'd like to make bikes for myself.

I can try to answer some other questions but remember I'm very new to the craft.

ahsere
03-12-2012, 06:49 PM
Congratulations on your experience, what a great feeling to be able to ride a bike you built yourself. I see in his website and also in your bike that Mr. Verdone favors a very compact type of frame, mountain bike-like, with lots of seatpost showing. As a fan of compacts frames, Iīd like to know if thatīs just a consequence of building lots of mountain bikes or he has a preference for compact frames for performance reasons.

monkeybanana86
03-12-2012, 08:27 PM
Congratulations on your experience, what a great feeling to be able to ride a bike you built yourself. I see in his website and also in your bike that Mr. Verdone favors a very compact type of frame, mountain bike-like, with lots of seatpost showing. As a fan of compacts frames, Iīd like to know if thatīs just a consequence of building lots of mountain bikes or he has a preference for compact frames for performance reasons.

Thank you!

About the frame. Pete is definitely a big mountain guy so I'm sure this plays a big role. But he has always stressed function before looks. When I asked him about the back slopping tube his argument was that diamond shaped frames are structurally stronger than level frames. I can't find the bike on his wiki, but there's a yellow frame that he put together for a petite woman and he was able to get the top tube to be almost parallel with the seat stays.

The lots of seatpost showing is a plus because that way his carbon post can bend. He once permanently bent a titanium post! As for me I just love silver parts (so I stuck with that thomson) since black seems to have taken over.

This may sound funny but for commuting (especially in heavy traffic hours) I prefer a level top tube because I sit on it at red lights.

edit: Here is what wikipedia has to say about compact frames. I would ignore most manufacturers' argument because I believe it's mostly a cost savings measure to them. Small, medium or large versus lets say sizes 49 to 62 cm.

"Compact geometry road frames have a lower center of gravity and tend to have a shorter wheelbase and smaller rear triangle, which give the bike quicker handling. Compact geometry also allows the top of the head tube to be above the top of the seat tube, decreasing standover height, and thus increasing standover clearance and lowering the center of gravity. Opinion is divided on the riding merits of the compact frame, but several manufacturers claim that a reduced range of sizes can fit most riders, and that it is easier to build a frame without a perfectly level top tube."

ahsere
03-13-2012, 10:17 AM
Thanks for your reply, I've had a few compact road bikes and I like the way they look but I am not exactly sure how they handle and behave differently than traditional bikes, as you say for mass producers like Giant it makes sense from a cost saving standpoint, with 4 sizes they cover all bases. However, the two best bikes I've had, a Serotta Legend Ti that I wrecked recently and my current favorite, a Waterford RS14, are both compact and they're no mass produced bikes. I noticed that the Waterford handles quicker than the Serotta, but not by much, and both are incredibly stable. I bought them both second hand and they were not designed for me, so I don't know what was the original reasoning behind choosing compact over traditional in neither of them.

monkeybanana86
03-14-2012, 12:51 AM
I'm no way an expert but maybe for the pros having a shorter wheelbase, lower center of mass, and just more of an aggressive frame makes sense but at the same time they have to ride bikes that look similar to mass market frames to benefit the manufacturers. I am as confused as you!

Serotta and Waterford I bet have a real good explanation. They make bikes like it's science. Bummer about your Legend Ti. I also wrecked a beloved bike, Colnago Master, when a lady ran a stop sign.

At the end of the day if the bike feels good AND looks good what more can you ask for?

ifouiripilay
05-05-2012, 11:50 PM
Nice, is this a one semester class or is this part of a program? It would be sweet to go back and learn something when I retire in 25yrs.

Cervelott
10-02-2012, 07:06 AM
Very neat, thanks for sharing!

559Rando
11-30-2012, 05:37 PM
Congrats. Cool story...would love to hear/see more about your experience in the class.

And I wish something like this was happening in my neck of the woods!

Connor
01-04-2013, 05:32 PM
Sounds like a great experince, I've been toying with the idea of taking the Paul Brodie course here in Vancouver. The only thing is I'd like to use my own tubing rather than the straight gauge 4130 he offers. However on the flip side it would be my first frame building experience and I'd hate to waste some nice tubing. Did you find it difficult to get the hang of the torch?

linkedrecoverie
01-06-2013, 03:40 PM
I'm coming back to this thread after reading it months ago. It planted a seed, and I'm leaning toward a week with Steve Garn. I know I won't be building anything super-light, and that's fine. I'm thinking about a gravel grinder, maybe even 650b.