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View Full Version : OT: Waaaaay OT!!! C-sections


Dave B
02-24-2012, 10:13 AM
ok, no gross details, but a week from yesterday (so march 1st) my wife is scheduled for a c-section for our little boy to arrive. Super excited and to be honest a smidge worried about my wife. I am sure the surgery, even though it is considered a mahor one, will go fine. However...I worry about what could happen. I am going to be positive and all that jazz.

Only down side is that I get a max 4 days off to be with her.

So my question is and I know it is subjective. how fast do moms bounce back after the birth? I know I can have some of the family look after her as well as baby happycampyer, but I worry about my wife. So dads, maybe a little advice on what would be awesome for my wife and what you wish you knew before that might help a bro out.

Cheers

AngryScientist
02-24-2012, 10:16 AM
I'll PM ya buddy.

rugbysecondrow
02-24-2012, 10:17 AM
She will spend 3 days of the 4 in the hospital of all goes well, longer if not. She can't lift, push, pull or anything strenuos for 10 -14 days. After that, all is good. Your job is to let her heal and mend. Also, your job is to change her dressings, which might be horrific for you if you are squeemish.

Somebody should be with her at all times for the first 10-14 days though. She shouldn't be lifting or walking with the baby.

Otherwise, just play it by ear. My wife has had two, one planned and one not planned, and she has had zero recovery issues. Other women are not so lucky.

Edit: What I wish I knew:

Be patient and get a few good books before hand. LOTS of down time. Babies are easy compared to toddlers, they don't do squat. Sleep when they sleep is true. Also, get to know the nurses and hospital staff, it will make your stay in the hospital easier. If you are sleeping in the room with your wife, bring Iburprofin because the fold-out bed sucks big time.

Also, when the staff asks if you want the baby to sleep with your or sleep in the nursery, have them take the baby away. As nice as it sounds to have to baby be with you, your wife needs to sleep and get well. The baby will do just fine elsewhere.

flydhest
02-24-2012, 10:23 AM
She will spend 3 days of the 4 in the hospital of all goes well, longer if not. She can't lift, push, pull or anything strenuos for 10 -14 days. After that, all is good. Your job is to let her heal and mend. Also, your job is to change her dressings, which might be horrific for you if you are squeemish.

Somebody should be with her at all times for the first 10-14 days though. She shouldn't be lifting or walking with the baby.

Otherwise, just play it by ear. My wife has had two, one planned and one not planned, and she has had zero recovery issues. Other women are not so lucky.

I agree largely with Rugby. Dote on her, is what I suggest. Strong women (and I clearly don't know your wife) may feel a need to "be tough" which I think is the wrong answer. What they have gone through is nothing short of heroic and it will be best for them, and therefore the baby, to take it easy and heal as completely as possible. A couple weeks of not lifting (but still holding, feeding, cuddling, adoring . . . ) is a good thing.

We live in a row house, so stairs are a part of everyday life. Minimizing the use of stairs is important. Abs matter a lot for stair climbing.

Better to err on the side of caution and give up a couple extra days of up and about than to do too much too soon and have to give up a couple of extra weeks.

rwsaunders
02-24-2012, 10:48 AM
That's a tough operation. Do you have help nearby as others have suggested, as there is no magic formula for a healthy recovery other than rest and common sense? Add to the fact that there are newborn duties as well, and you'll understand even more why your wife is special.

I'm no Doc, but did you get a second opinion confirming that she actually needs the procedure? I ask this as baby number was one delivered via C-section due to an emergency during delivery. Our other two were delivered without this procedure. I previously held the understanding that once a woman gave birth via C-section, there was no other option, but our experiences proved otherwise.

Best of luck to both of you.

Dave B
02-24-2012, 10:54 AM
That's a tough operation. Do you have help nearby as others have suggested, as there is no magic formula for a healthy recovery other than rest and common sense? Add to the fact that there are newborn duties as well, and you'll understand even more why your wife is special.

I'm no Doc, but did you get a second opinion confirming that she actually needs the procedure? I ask this as baby number was one delivered via C-section due to an emergency during delivery. Our other two were delivered without this procedure. I previously held the understanding that once a woman gave birth via C-section, there was no other option, but our experiences proved otherwise.

Best of luck to both of you.


Yeah little boy is breach and while we could have had a procedure to turn him Liz (my wife) had lower amounts of fluid and the difficult procedure became even more so.

We do have some help. Her folks are willing, but her dad is going through brutal radiation for lymphoma and a new method of harvesting stem cells to regenerate marrow growth. Cool stuff, but still a cancer battle.

I think we can be covered with help, just crossing the I's and dotting the T's. ;)


i appreciate all the suggestions. Liz is typical German woman, very hard nosed and will need reminders to be still, not try to re-roof the house and so on. ;)

Thanks gents as always my deepest thanks for the help.

Dave

tsarpepe
02-24-2012, 10:58 AM
I've been through this. The physical side of the ordeal and recovery is one thing, and here I second the words of the guys above me. There is also the psychological side. C-sections come with a feeling of inadequacy. She won't say it, but the thoughts "I am not like the others. Is this how I begin my motherhood? Why couldn't I deliver normally?" will be there, consciously or subconsciously. They will stay after the physical effects are overcome. So, be prepared for giving psychological comfort as well. It is equally needed.

Fixed
02-24-2012, 11:00 AM
ours was a c section it went great
it is fast we went in at 6 by eight i was holding my son .and that was almost 20 years ago.
he or she will have the best shaped head in the ward .
cheers

Keith A
02-24-2012, 11:01 AM
Just a few comments to add, our first was delivered as a C-section, but that was after 24 hours of hard labor. This was a long recovery for my wife and pretty hard physically as well. The second was a planned C-section and this was a breeze compared to the first...which was good since at that point we had a toddler along with a new baby to care for. Our third was delivered naturally even with two prior C-sections.

I'm with rwsaunders and would make sure that a C-section is really necessary. If you search the Internet, you will see many articles about how C-sections in the US are on the rise and why many may not be necessary. I know my wife's first one was necessary, but I now question the decision of the doc for the 2nd one since our third was not a C-section.

bumknees
02-24-2012, 11:04 AM
PM sent

crownjewelwl
02-24-2012, 11:07 AM
first was emergency and was an awful experience. second was planned so an altogether "pleasant" experience. there's a calmness when you know what is happening and when.

it is a surgical procedure so all the usual stuff applies.

i know you'll be tempted but DO NOT look over the other side of the sheet!

Dave B
02-24-2012, 11:12 AM
first was emergency and was an awful experience. second was planned so an altogether "pleasant" experience. there's a calmness when you know what is happening and when.

it is a surgical procedure so all the usual stuff applies.

i know you'll be tempted but DO NOT look over the other side of the sheet!


Yeah, I plan on being up by her head the entire time. More for her then me, but I do not want to see anything near that area. ;)

bargainguy
02-24-2012, 11:16 AM
Back when I was doing the medical thing, breech presentation was always an indication for section. Too much risk for fetal hypoxia if vaginal delivery is attempted. Baby gets brain damage from the get-go....you don't want to go there.

C-section is actually preferred in some instances. Big baby/small pelvis; ease of second and further deliveries, plus no labor, and mom knows what to expect instead of having to be induced or go through God knows what kind of labor. These days, sections are usually done via epidural or spinal anesthesia so mom is mostly awake during the procedure.

Best wishes to you all. Hoping for a healthy baby and happy parents.

Don

Dave B
02-24-2012, 11:29 AM
Back when I was doing the medical thing, breech presentation was always an indication for section. Too much risk for fetal hypoxia if vaginal delivery is attempted. Baby gets brain damage from the get-go....you don't want to go there.

C-section is actually preferred in some instances. Big baby/small pelvis; ease of second and further deliveries, plus no labor, and mom knows what to expect instead of having to be induced or go through God knows what kind of labor. These days, sections are usually done via epidural or spinal anesthesia so mom is mostly awake during the procedure.

Best wishes to you all. Hoping for a healthy baby and happy parents.

Don


Cheers mate appreciate the thoughts. Breach has us sorted into a c-section. We know it is coming and are doing our best to be prepared, everyone's words help.

Will let everyone know next week how things go. If you are in Indy during next weekend come on by! :beer:

gasman
02-24-2012, 12:20 PM
Breech presentation is basically an absolute indication for a C/S .
Best of luck and good advice above.

Ray
02-24-2012, 12:24 PM
first was emergency and was an awful experience. second was planned so an altogether "pleasant" experience. there's a calmness when you know what is happening and when.

it is a surgical procedure so all the usual stuff applies.

i know you'll be tempted but DO NOT look over the other side of the sheet!
A bit late to respond, but my wife also had two, one difficult, one (relatively) easy. The first was an emergency after 36 hours of labor and suddenly things started going wrong, doctors sprinting down the hall, the whole drill. It was the most frightening and emotionally harrowing experience of my life, as basically an observer by that point. Despite that, it went well, my wife was just exhausted for several days, but I think that was the preceding couple of days more than the surgery. She was able to be up and walking within a few days - I think she was home from the hospital 2-3 days later despite the ordeal. No real lifting for a while, but she was able to hold the baby pretty much right away and I remember the three of us taking a walk around the neighborhood within several days. But with a first baby, it wasn't too bad because she could sleep as much as the baby, which was a LOT at first. And I've never taken she or our first daughter for granted for a day since, because if we'd been alive 50-100 years earlier, I'd have very likely lost both of them.

The second one was just a relative piece of cake. She'd made the decision not to try vaginal birth (it was a relatively new option at that point, 23 years ago) and she just had an appointment to go have a baby. It went very smoothly, although the baby was a little undercooked and could have used another week or two in the oven. We were all home a couple of days later - I took about a week off of work so she wouldn't have to lift anything, but when I went back to work she was fine. We had plenty of people ready to jump in but she was really OK, without having gone through so much pre-delivery trauma. And with two kids to deal with at that point.

If anything, I'd assume that medical science and surgical procedures would make it slightly easier now, a couple of decades later. But, every situation and every woman is different, so just be ready to do whatever you need to for a while. And, I DID look over the curtain for the first one - I watched pretty much the whole thing - and it was among the most amazing and fascinating things I've ever seen in my life. Aside from the miracle of our daughter emerging into the world, just the surgical procedure was really something to see. They literally took the uterus out and plopped it up on her chest to sew up the incision, then stuffed it back into the abdomen and sewed up the outer layers. Might have been tough for some to see, but I'm glad I got to have the experience. They made me sit behind the curtain for the second one...

Good luck - the docs and, PARTICULARLY, the nurses are incredibly good at what they do. Listen to them - they're a huge help.

-Ray

MadRocketSci
02-24-2012, 12:26 PM
Plan what you want right after the birth. You'll cut the cord and all that, but since mom will be going through post-op, it's on you to do the initial bonding. If it matters to you, the nurses will want to do all the bathing, prepping, etc stuff right away, but I chose to delay that for 15 minutes and have some good old fashioned skin-on-skin bonding time. So, again, if that's something that you want for your child, make sure you discuss that with the staff ahead of time.

1happygirl
02-24-2012, 12:29 PM
Hey Mr. P:

Could you possibly look into FMLA (family medical leave act) at your job for 6-12 weeks off? Unfortunately, unpaid leave but the time with your wife and new one would be priceless. Just a suggestion to look into. All the above c/s info is good advice and keeping an eye on incision and daily cleaning.

Congrats!

Dave B
02-24-2012, 12:38 PM
Hey Mr. P:

Could you possibly look into FMLA (family medical leave act) at your job for 6-12 weeks off? Unfortunately, unpaid leave but the time with your wife and new one would be priceless. Just a suggestion to look into. All the above c/s info is good advice and keeping an eye on incision and daily cleaning.

Congrats!


Well, she is taking the rest of the year off so I have to work to keep getting paid as well as medical benefits. I do appreciate the idea, but one we cannot go with...however, I am sure the lottery will be won by us any day now! ;)

Cheers

Dave

Liv2RideHard
02-24-2012, 12:47 PM
We had twins 7 mos ago and had to have a C-section b/c one of our little dudes was breached. Our other 2 kiddos were natural. Do not let her lift anything man, not even baby. She will want to be super mom straight away but she will realize she has to recover. It took my wife around 8 weeks to fully recover. The incision and her abdominal area were super sensitive and sore. The procedure itself goes by super fast. It takes time to stitch her back up though and you will probably go with baby while they do that. Let baby sleep in the nursery while in hospital...get rest. You and your wife are going to be exhausted from everything. All the best to your wife, you and baby.

fireball
02-24-2012, 01:13 PM
The decision to have a c-section was made for my wife and me. My wife was already two weeks past her due date and after two days of induction drugs the baby just wasn't going to come out on his own. In fact, she never even showed signs of going into early labor. We were advised by the Dr. that it would be dangerous to continue waiting on the induction drugs to work and that we really needed to have a baby out. This advice, coming from the Dr. with the smallest number of c-sections in the practice, was important to hear. It's not about the experience you wanted but it is about the health and safety of both mother and baby.

In addition, when it was all over, we left the hospital with a healthy little baby boy (who didn't have a weirdly shaped head btw).

Focus on the outcome and not the journey. Fatherhood is great.

67-59
02-24-2012, 01:19 PM
Lots of great advice here, so I don't have too much to add.

However, I will respectfully disagree with a suggestion not to have the baby sleep with you or your wife, if offered. When our first was born, my wife was already fast asleep by the time our daugher was checked and cleaned up (long labor). The nurse offered to let her sleep with me on the fold-our sofa, so I accepted. I didn't sleep a wink, but it wasn't because our daughter was making noise - it was because I was just watching this tiny miracle breathe, yawn, and occasionally stretch. One of the best memories of my life....

And if the baby does start to interfere with your wife's sleep, you can always call the nurse and take the nursery option.

Congrats, and enjoy EVERY moment. Your parents were right when they told you it goes by so fast.

:beer:

Keith A
02-24-2012, 01:32 PM
A bit late to respond, but my wife also had two, one difficult, one (relatively) easy. The first was an emergency after 36 hours of labor and suddenly things started going wrong, doctors sprinting down the hall, the whole drill. It was the most frightening and emotionally harrowing experience of my life, as basically an observer by that point....Ray -- This sounds exactly like our first one with my wife being in labor for more than 24 hours, she was exhausted and our little one just wasn't cooperating. Then our baby's heart rate started dropping and they got all worried and decided a C-section was necessary. Talk about emotionally draining experience...I was glad my mom was there cause I just fell apart after it was all over with.

One other bit on input is that the nurses will let you do as little or as much care for the infant as you want. But their default mode of operation is to let you do it all, so if your wife (and you) need some rest, let the nurses take him/her to the nursery and give you guys a break. I didn't realize this the first time around and was obviously inexperienced (and nervous) about caring for an infant and was trying to do it all, but I now know that the nurses will care for your child if you need help or a break.

rugbysecondrow
02-24-2012, 01:47 PM
Ray -- This sounds exactly like our first one with my wife being in labor for more than 24 hours, she was exhausted and our little one just wasn't cooperating. Then our baby's heart rate started dropping and they got all worried and decided a C-section was necessary. Talk about emotionally draining experience...I was glad my mom was there cause I just fell apart after it was all over with.
.

Ditto. I was strong, decisive, supportive and caring throughout. Afterwards, I was escorted back to my room, my daughter left for evaluation, finally by myself and the reality of what just happend hit. Phew.

rwsaunders
02-24-2012, 02:10 PM
i know you'll be tempted but DO NOT look over the other side of the sheet!

I did... :cool:

Villgaxx
02-24-2012, 02:14 PM
If this is your (her) first baby and first C-section, you (she) might want to get a very candid self-evaluation of your (her) doctor's surgical skills before the baby is born.

My wife was advised by her OB to have a plastic surgeon do the incision and closing so that the scar would be essentially invisible. It was a nice gesture, due to her age, young, and her work. They (the OB and the plastic surgeon) did a nice job, with a minimal incision in exactly the proper place that closed perfectly and is almost completely invisible. If that sort of stuff matters, it can't hurt to get the dr. into the proper frame of mind.

bargainguy
02-24-2012, 02:31 PM
Having a plastic surgeon do the incision and closure would be awesome. Not something I saw many patients availing themselves of, tho managed care etc. might be one reason, gotta pay extra. At some teaching facilities, might even be a resident doing the closure, so money well spent.

Don

binouye
02-24-2012, 03:21 PM
Lots of good advice here already -- +1 to the thought of psychological support as well as physical. My wife's CS came after 30+ hours of labor when things weren't going well, and she regretted not being able to do everything herself.

Her recovery from the CS was longer too; 3 days in hospital and then a couple weeks at home. There were complications during the CS that caused lots of blood loss for her and some severed abdominal muscles that took a long time to heal (at least a year). But our daughter was fine the whole way through and is doing great (several years old). Average recovery time is pretty quick, but it is surgery, and sometimes recovery takes longer if there are complications.

mandasol
02-24-2012, 03:42 PM
The doc that performed on my wife was not a plastic surgeon but was very talented none the less. The stitches were inside the incision making them practically invisible. Also, they wrapped her belly in this second skin type material that we didn't have to change. When it was time they removed it and she was practically healed and you could barely see the scar.

Before the operation its o.k. to ask what type of incision they are going to do (vertical or horizontal, high or low as well), and how are they going to close the incision. My sister had staples and you can still see the staple marks and it's been 10 years.

Something else to keep in mind is nutrition. Having a baby depletes a lot of nutrients from the mother (especially calcium) so she needs a nutrient rich diet until she completely recovers. That first few weeks she may be too tired from the surgery and from taking care of the baby to prepare healthy meals for herself so it's your job to make sure she eats well.

bumknees
02-24-2012, 03:49 PM
I did... :cool:


so did I... sort of like looking into the cavity of a Thanksgiving turkey

chuckred
02-24-2012, 03:53 PM
My daughter went through 2.

The first was unplanned and after it was determined the labor would be protracted and rough on both baby and mom. The second was planned and scheduled (although the schedule went out the window when the baby decided he wanted to come out and join the party on Christmas Eve).

She did not heal well the first time, and it took quite a while to recover, the second went as planned and recovery followed the 6 week time frame (for when normal lifting, etc. can begin again).

While it is scarry to think about, on the other hand, a bad "normal" delivery can really be rough. Without being graphic, think about the anatomy and what can happen if things go bad. Just trying to say that when indicated, c-sections are easier on the mom and baby both.

Hang in there, get the cigars ready, and don't panic! I'd expect things to go fine!

BumbleBeeDave
02-24-2012, 03:54 PM
. . .but I just think it's so cool that this place exists and we can get adivce and support like this from each other.

(Group hug!) :beer:

BBD

William
02-24-2012, 05:54 PM
Ray -- This sounds exactly like our first one with my wife being in labor for more than 24 hours, she was exhausted and our little one just wasn't cooperating. Then our baby's heart rate started dropping and they got all worried and decided a C-section was necessary. Talk about emotionally draining experience...


The deliveries for both of our children were quite dramatic...I'm not trying to scare you, but like you are already aware, childbirth isn't a routine procedure.

Our first was very similar. A long labor and then things started going downhill fast that resulted in an emergency C-section. The obstetrician thought normal delivery would be ok. In hindsight, looking at me and my wife should have been a good indicator to make sure because there was no way the babies head was going to make it through. unfortunately the doc was going to retire shortly and couldn't stop talking about moving to their home in Costa Rica. She had checked out because the doc for our second couldn't believe that they had tried to do it naturally.

because of what happened with out first, our second child was a planned C-section and everything went normal until just after our daughter was delivered. They nicked an artery and started to close her up. My wife knew something was wrong before they did. My daughter and I were rushed out while they went in to stop the bleeding. thankfully my wife survived and that my mom came to help out during her recovery.

Today both of our children are thriving and smart individuals but it was a scary start for us to be sure.






William

bart998
02-24-2012, 06:19 PM
Just a few comments to add, our first was delivered as a C-section, but that was after 24 hours of hard labor. This was a long recovery for my wife and pretty hard physically as well. The second was a planned C-section and this was a breeze compared to the first...which was good since at that point we had a toddler along with a new baby to care for. Our third was delivered naturally even with two prior C-sections.

I'm with rwsaunders and would make sure that a C-section is really necessary. If you search the Internet, you will see many articles about how C-sections in the US are on the rise and why many may not be necessary. I know my wife's first one was necessary, but I now question the decision of the doc for the 2nd one since our third was not a C-section.

I could have written this one. Exactly our story. After the second one I found out the Dr. doesn't like V-Back births, went with a different Dr. for the third. No problems. The advice about your job is helping her heal is spot on. You will find yourself going to the store at odd hours buying stuff you never thought you'd buy, like "stool softener". Being a dad is great, enjoy every minute because they grow-up fast.

The two C-sections were completely different experiences. I was in the surgery for both. The first was emergent and my wife was under general anesthesia. I spend a lot of time in the ER as a cop. So they let me suit in, watch the incision, cut the cord, take the kid, clean the kid, take the foot prints, and put on the leg band.

For the second, my wife of awake so I stayed with her and held her hand as she was stitched up while they took care of the baby.

craptacular
02-25-2012, 08:52 AM
Try to maybe read up on some of Ina May Gaskin's writings on breech childbirth. Might help to put your wife more at ease. Here is one by her on the topic. http://www.inamay.com/article/undervalued-art-vaginal-breech-birth-skill-every-birth-attendant-should-learn

csm
02-25-2012, 09:41 AM
c-section here for my youngest. funny story... the doc was a girl a couple years ahead of me in school; we were on the swim team together. she was on the short side... I would go to some of the appts and we'd talk about high school, swimming etc. I would sit there thinking "if I'd paid attention a little more in school, had the motivation, etc I could be a doctor."
the big day arrives and the doc decides we are doing an unplanned c-section. as I watch her step on stool to reach the table (she was short), pull out surgical tools, and basically take my wife apart to get the kid out, I stopped with the fantasy that "I could do that."

VTCaraco
02-25-2012, 11:07 AM
It was right about this time of year in 98 that we were entrenched in the struggle to convince our hospital that the C-section was right for us. My wife had been in a horrific accident 2 years prior and her super-hero-esque doctors that had patched her up from that affair were insisting that a natural child birth would be incredibly dangerous for her. As a teacher myself, I had a student/family that I knew well that was an OB/Gyn and cardiac specialist mom/dad. They offered to do the procedure for us but a strategic call to the hospital administrator from our trauma doctors (in VA ~ and we were in VT) sealed the deal and we were able to work with our original doctors. In short, it was quite an affair leading up to things.

My wife is a trooper... way tougher than me.
To you give you a flavor for her personality, she literally threw the ol What to expect when you're expecting book at me and said "what the hell did you do to me...I don't want to know anything more about that" in her first trimester. She had several friends and coworkers that were pregnant at the same time and she didn't feel any less maternal or feminine based on the path that she traveled. And absent the science of what's happening 'down there' the whole thing was a slam-dunk for us.
Our son was born at the end of the school year so I wrapped up when he was born. I remember helping out, but nothing crazy. We have stairs and she traveled up and down them without incident. And it all went by very smoothly.

As with many other things on this forum, YMMV, but focus on the spectacular part of it all and don't give a whole lot of energy to thinking about the what-ifs and the science / kinesthetic side of it. If there's one thing I've learned from standing by her side through all of the medical nonsense she had to go through (3 weeks in surgery trauma icu with her MDs calling several family meetings to ask how long we wanted to keep her alive); find a doctor that you trust in and then shut down the analytical side of your mind.

And enjoy the heck out of the new addition. I know you've done this before, but focus on the excitement and shower your family with tons of extra love and attention :beer:

DY123
02-25-2012, 11:16 AM
Wow, I feel very lucky hearing all these stories. Just to give the original poster some hope and not add to his anxiety, I wanted to say that it also can go very well.

Ours was an emergency c-section, so there was a lot of fuss, stress and not much time for questions. Once her doctor arrived it all went well and was very quick. I even watched.

Must have been a great MD because she was up walking (slowly) around the ward the next day. We left after 3 days.

At first she was sad to not have done it the regular way, but after healing so well and quicker than her friends that a done it the regular way, she was happy that it turned out the way it did.

We had two grandmothers with us for a couple of weeks and that really helped with the recovery.

If you have family there, it will be a big help and speed up the recovery.

Ray
02-25-2012, 11:26 AM
Ray -- This sounds exactly like our first one with my wife being in labor for more than 24 hours, she was exhausted and our little one just wasn't cooperating. Then our baby's heart rate started dropping and they got all worried and decided a C-section was necessary. Talk about emotionally draining experience...I was glad my mom was there cause I just fell apart after it was all over with.

Ditto. I was strong, decisive, supportive and caring throughout. Afterwards, I was escorted back to my room, my daughter left for evaluation, finally by myself and the reality of what just happend hit. Phew.

In our case, it was complicated by my mother-in-law being there. It was very stressful and exhausting for the day and a half BEFORE it all got crazy and then when it did, she couldn't handle seeing what was happening to her daughter and she just up and passed out a couple of times. So I'm trying to make sure SOMEONE is taking care of her while I'm trying to stay on top of the much more critical issues happening with my wife and daughter-to-be. As Paul said, I was as strong and together as I needed to be while it was all happening and then when I got home that night, with everyone safe and OK, I just completely broke down emotionally. Totally fell apart. Just realizing how close it had been and recognizing how routine childbirth SEEMS to be in the modern era because our docs and hospitals are so good at it. It wasn't like that even half a century ago when I was born, let alon the century ago (plus or minus) when my parents and grandparent came along. I'd have been a lonely widower with no wife or kids if we'd run into that situation that long ago.

The good news for the OP, though, is that in every case presented here, it came out OK. And the planned and scheduled C-sections were almost always low-stress affairs that went very well (with I think one exception in this thread?).

BTW, my daughter who was the one born during that really harrowing c-section had been in all kinds of stress in the womb when they finally decided to go get her.... I forget all of the things that were going wrong, but it was all going bad very quickly and we very easily could have lost her even if my wife had been OK. In any case, she was non-plussed by the whole thing. She's the most together young woman I know, strong and sweet and even tempered all at once - totally takes after her mother! And she's getting ready to start medical school in the Fall. Amazing how these things go...

Enjoy every minute!

-Ray

Keith A
02-25-2012, 12:08 PM
...Just realizing how close it had been and recognizing how routine childbirth SEEMS to be in the modern era because our docs and hospitals are so good at it. It wasn't like that even half a century ago when I was born, let alone the century ago (plus or minus) when my parents and grandparent came along. I'd have been a lonely widower with no wife or kids if we'd run into that situation that long ago.Ray -- I had those exact same thoughts when this was taking place and afterwards. What would have happened if this was just me and the mid-wife as in the days gone by? I think there is a good chance that neither my wife or daughter would be with me now. I am extremely grateful for modern medicine!

d_douglas
02-25-2012, 02:01 PM
Having a plastic surgeon do the incision and closure would be awesome. Not something I saw many patients availing themselves of, tho managed care etc. might be one reason, gotta pay extra. At some teaching facilities, might even be a resident doing the closure, so money well spent.

Don


Not much else to say. Our daughters birth was the single most exciting moment of my life - crying, jumping around with joy etc. It was amazing and it was a C section.

Not sure how you'll react, but just let your emotional go unleashed.

spiderman
02-25-2012, 10:20 PM
The birth of your first
Is life changing
And formative for your marriage relationship!

I lost track at 1,500 deliveries
And am credentialed for primary cesareans.
I have seen plastic surgeons make a mess of
C-sections...numbers count for the procedure...
You deliver enough babies
And you deliver vaginal breech presentations...
But they aren't something you plan these days.
The biggest risk isn't your wife necessarily
Babies delivered by c/s have greater lung maturity issues.
Contractions are good for lung maturity...
Just make sure your plan for delivery is on or after
39 weeks gestation...don't fall for sooner...
Unless active labor
And cervical change necessitate earlier delivery.
Planned deliveries are typically much easier on moms.
I often have first time moms leave the hospital
Post op day 2 or 3 in great shape.
Ours is a small community hospital
With a very low wound infection rate...
Some bigger centers have much higher rates
Of wound infections and other complications.

As far as versions go...I typically recommend them
Less and less...when babies are breech there's probably
A reason...I have moms try a simple "all fours"
Yoga stretching program for 20 minutes a day.
You'd be surprised how often this simple excercise
Can be successful in encouraging
A favorable vertex presentation!

Obtw...My dad bought my mom a single rose
And a dozen for me...
I did the same for my wife.
She's not a huge flower fan
But she really loved that...
Soak it in/steep in the experience.
You will be forever changed for the better!

The biggest restriction is no driving for two weeks.
I lift that sooner if moms are not taking pain pills.
Just make sure if she is nursing she doesn't take codeine!

Once again,
Congratulations!
Love, cherish and remember to replace the diaper
When you change the first diaper!

DY123
02-25-2012, 11:12 PM
@spiderman

Funny you should mention yoga. Our baby was breech a couple of weeks out. They recommended yoga and swimming. It worked. The baby did in fact turn.

Problem was that on the day that labor started, they felt the cord next to the babies head. Doc was worried that it may become impinged (or whatever the correct word is) so they opted for c-section.

They rushed us into emergency surgery. It was pretty stressful and confusing, especially since we had done so much work to get the baby to turn.

I guess in the end we were lucky. All worked out fine.....just a really crazy day.

spiderman
02-26-2012, 11:13 AM
@spiderman

Funny you should mention yoga. Our baby was breech a couple of weeks out. They recommended yoga and swimming. It worked. The baby did in fact turn.

Problem was that on the day that labor started, they felt the cord next to the babies head. Doc was worried that it may become impinged (or whatever the correct word is) so they opted for c-section.

They rushed us into emergency surgery. It was pretty stressful and confusing, especially since we had done so much work to get the baby to turn.

I guess in the end we were lucky. All worked out fine.....just a really crazy day.

...Healthy mom and healthy baby...
Is the main thing
--and a daddy who remains concious--
Breech for a reason
Does take on new meaning when those things happen!
My last breech that presented during labor
Was a cord prolapse...all turned out well...
But when you get prepped with the patient
It is ... Like you said...a little stressful!

Dave B
03-02-2012, 11:44 AM
Well, little William Bradley (aka baby-happycampyer) arrived yesterday. Mom is doing well and did pretty good through the procedure. She had some anxiety during the surgery and I was able to manage that, but she looks beautiful and is healing really well. Even the nurses and doctors are impressed.

My little boy is great and doing well. Sleep for the adults is a long ago dream. He looks like his mom and that bodes well for him as he grows up.

Thank you to all who gave me good questions to ask and the doctor was fantastic with everyone I had.

Cheers

Dave

Fishbike
03-02-2012, 11:55 AM
Congratulations and best wishes! So when does he get the first bike?

William
03-02-2012, 11:59 AM
Wonderful news! Congratulations Dave!





William

Keith A
03-02-2012, 12:02 PM
Great news! Congratulations to all. One of these days you'll end up like me with my last child approaching the time when she'll leave home...this is going to be a very sad day.

firerescuefin
03-02-2012, 12:28 PM
Awesome news brother :beer:

crownjewelwl
03-02-2012, 12:47 PM
mazel tov!

sleep is tough, but every day it gets a bit easier!!

SpeedyChix
03-02-2012, 12:58 PM
Huge congrats Dave!

AngryScientist
03-02-2012, 01:03 PM
:beer:

congratulations Dave - you are going to be a great father.

roydyates
03-02-2012, 09:51 PM
Yeah, I plan on being up by her head the entire time. More for her then me, but I do not want to see anything near that area. ;)
Given that you and crownjewelwl vote to not watch, my strong advice is ... Make sure to watch!!! At the very least, take a peek.

I've watched the procedure for all three of my kids. It is compelling and memorable.

Fixed
03-02-2012, 09:58 PM
bravo bro :hello: :beer: cheers :beer:

Ken Robb
03-02-2012, 10:36 PM
He looks like his mom and that bodes well for him as he grows up.



Cheers

Dave
Your wife is bald and has scrunched-up eyes? :)

Dave B
03-03-2012, 10:08 AM
Your wife is bald and has scrunched-up eyes? :)


Something like that. ;)


After a few days w/o sleep maybe.

happycampyer
03-03-2012, 10:40 AM
Cangrats, Dave!

As I mentioned to you in my email, instead of a silver spoon, he needs a silver Campagnolo peanut butter wrench! ;)

Dave B
03-03-2012, 04:20 PM
Cangrats, Dave!

As I mentioned to you in my email, instead of a silver spoon, he needs a silver Campagnolo peanut butter wrench! ;)



I know I totally agree!

He someday will lern the ways of campy.

erolorhun
03-04-2012, 03:58 PM
Maşallah and congratulations. The sleep... it gets better. And as they say, try to remember the small things, they do grow up fast.

As to the peek-or-not debate, I would watch if it was allowed. Somehow I believe that it is important to see that aspect of life as well. It would be a privilige and honor.

Edit: This thread is a perfect example of why I find this forum among the best that I visit.

VTCaraco
03-04-2012, 07:51 PM
When our son was born we had a painter working on the interior of our house. He explained how he LOVED it when his daughter woke up in the middle of the night as he knew that her interest in spending time with him would pass. It was an interesting flip on the sleeplessness; and something that can definitely make sense in hindsight as our guy is staring down the 14th anniversary of his existence.

As you know, none of it lasts long, so soak it all up.


And I'd recommend you come back to the motor-less hobby for at least a starting point for this guy :beer:

Thanks for letting us know that all turned out well.

WickedWheels
03-04-2012, 11:16 PM
I didn't read any of the responses, but every woman is different.

My wife was back at work 2 weeks after her unscheduled, 3-week-early-birth C-section. She's a dentist with her own practice, so she was concerned about her patients. I made her go back to work gently... only a few hours a day at first, but still... she was on her feet working after 2 weeks.

Good luck!

WickedWheels
03-04-2012, 11:17 PM
Nevermind! Congratulations!