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  #31  
Old 07-17-2017, 10:03 AM
SoCalSteve SoCalSteve is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clean39T View Post
True. All I have to go on is that the owner said "not as stiff as my race bike for sprinting or standing climbing" "great seated climber" "absorbed road chatter really well (frame and fork), with the fork still being laterally stiff" and some other niceties. He's only 185lbs and with it not being crit geometry, and based on his description, I'd imagine it's 8.5.

Still, I gotta check fit a bit more.

Then it's a matter of being willing (or not) to lose a few hundred or so if I don't like it and have to resale.
Without the rest of the build sheet, it's still a crapshoot. Everyone has different perceptions. One mans too stiff is another's bliss. The beauty of total custom is that it can be tuned for the original owner...not so much for anyone else.

Try to pay as little as possible so if you do hate it, hopefully you won't lose too much if any on resale.

Good luck!
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  #32  
Old 07-17-2017, 10:14 AM
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FlashUNC FlashUNC is offline
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It's a total throwback of the dice. Perfect forum-centric example. My Rock Lobster is stupidly comfortable for me, even though it's got beer can sized aluminum tubes and cyclocross chainstays. Elefantino took it for a spin not too long ago and declared it unacceptably harsh and stiff. (And feel free to chime in Elefantino if I'm not characterizing that correctly.)

Horses for courses man, and buying someone else's custom that worked for them may not work for you.
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  #33  
Old 07-17-2017, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by FlashUNC View Post
It's a total throwback of the dice. Perfect forum-centric example. My Rock Lobster is stupidly comfortable for me, even though it's got beer can sized aluminum tubes and cyclocross chainstays. Elefantino took it for a spin not too long ago and declared it unacceptably harsh and stiff. (And feel free to chime in Elefantino if I'm not characterizing that correctly.)



Horses for courses man, and buying someone else's custom that worked for them may not work for you.


True, true.

Everyone's spine has a different harmonic conversion.
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  #34  
Old 07-17-2017, 12:43 PM
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572cv 572cv is offline
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I have a Meivici I got second hand a year and a half before the end of Serotta.... The geometry looked to be an excellent fit for me, and it has been. So, that is a big hurdle on any second hand bike. The bike is all the good things others have said about a Meivici, and a joy to ride. I think I got lucky in that regard. This is a beautifully conceived, well crafted and fine performing bike design. I can't think of another manufacturer besides Colnago who went with the lugged carbon approach.

Like you, I did not know what stiffness was in the tubes. The original owner probably weighed what I do, and selected something that made it pretty stiff, but not too stiff. That's how it feels anyway. I did learn later (through a dealer) that the fork I first sourced for the frame was not at the original rake, so I ordered a replacement that was correct. After that, the bike could hit the high notes. But given uncertainty, I paid stupid little for the frame, and could still justify the new fork. My two cents is to pay a low entry fee, make sure the fork is original, and take your chances at that point. With any reasonable luck, you will have a great value.
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  #35  
Old 07-17-2017, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by woodworker View Post
RIP Clay Mankin, and the store that he ran back in the day. I used to love looking at the beautiful steel Scapin bikes that he had, and I ultimately bought one of those and later a Seven. Guys like Clay don't come around very often.
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Originally Posted by oldpotatoe View Post
I went to Milan for the Italian bike show with Clay and 11 others and a nicer guy you'll never meet..a real shame..RIP..both he and his shop.
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Originally Posted by bobswire View Post
Agree, I used to stop in at least once a week on my weekly rides over to the GG Bridge to get my eye candy fix.
I felt the same way about Clay. He lived in Berkeley, about a block from one of my best friends. The style of that shop was the fore bearer of what many shops have now become. He was a fit guy yet had a heart attack while riding. Just so sad. His wife tried to keep it going, but with a young son it became just too much.
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  #36  
Old 07-17-2017, 02:49 PM
one60 one60 is offline
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Originally Posted by 572cv View Post
I can't think of another manufacturer besides Colnago who went with the lugged carbon approach.
While many brands are moving to monocoque construction there are lugged carbon frames available from TIME, LOOK, FESTKA Calfee, Hollands and others.

(Contenders in SLU has some great discounts on new lugged TIMES)
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  #37  
Old 07-17-2017, 02:52 PM
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572cv 572cv is offline
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Originally Posted by one60 View Post
While many brands are moving to monocoque construction there are lugged carbon frames available from TIME, LOOK, FESTKA Calfee, Hollands and others.

(Contenders in SLU has some great discounts on new lugged TIMES)
Pretty much right after I posted that, i realized I would be corrected.

Thanks for pointing out the options.
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  #38  
Old 07-17-2017, 03:32 PM
HenryA HenryA is offline
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If the original owner is about your size and weight, and his description appeals to you - buy the bike. If the price is around fair market value you won't lose much if any if you do need to sell it on.
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  #39  
Old 07-17-2017, 03:36 PM
one60 one60 is offline
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gave me a good excuse to look at that Hollands!

Quote:
Originally Posted by 572cv View Post
Pretty much right after I posted that, i realized I would be corrected.

Thanks for pointing out the options.
No worries...sure that's a partial list anyways
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  #40  
Old 07-17-2017, 07:15 PM
Clean39T Clean39T is offline
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Ok, I went and sat on a Fuji Gran Fondo that would have had roughly the same height bars and they are just too far up there. It'd be okay for a gravel or touring bike - too high though for the road for me.

Thanks for the insights nonetheless!
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  #41  
Old 07-17-2017, 08:50 PM
makoti makoti is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by one60 View Post
While many brands are moving to monocoque construction there are lugged carbon frames available from TIME, LOOK, FESTKA Calfee, Hollands and others.

(Contenders in SLU has some great discounts on new lugged TIMES)
Don't forget Nick Crumpton.
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  #42  
Old 07-17-2017, 09:39 PM
Kirk007 Kirk007 is offline
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Originally Posted by makoti View Post
Don't forget Nick Crumpton.
And now the folks at Hampsten.
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  #43  
Old 07-18-2017, 08:19 AM
one60 one60 is offline
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tube to tube construction

Don't believe Crumpton, Craddock/Filament or Hampsten are doing lugged carbon?

Of course, would love to hear from carbon builder who can comment on any differences on ride quality between those methods.
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  #44  
Old 07-18-2017, 09:23 AM
happycampyer happycampyer is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by one60 View Post
Don't believe Crumpton, Craddock/Filament or Hampsten are doing lugged carbon?

Of course, would love to hear from carbon builder who can comment on any differences on ride quality between those methods.
You are correct that Crumpton, Parlee, Hampsten and others use tube-to-tube construction. There are many threads in the archives discussing these methods. Regarding ride quality, one can build a great riding bike or a ****ty riding bike using either method (or monocoque construction, for that matter).
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  #45  
Old 07-18-2017, 12:32 PM
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pdmtong pdmtong is offline
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Parlee is not lugged. They miter the tubes to fit perfectly then wrap the joints using their own technique. it just looks like a lug.
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