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  #16  
Old 03-19-2017, 04:57 AM
alancw3 alancw3 is offline
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you guys need to watch the movie "cadillac records", which is really about chess records in chicago. it is aired on pbs channels occasionally. gives a history, sort of, of early black rock and roll pioneers. muddy waters. willie dixon, chuck berry, etta james and leonard chess to name a few. great watch. at the end of the movie there is a update on each of their lives. if i remember correctly chuck berry successfully sued the beach boys for $1 million for stealing one of his records and changing the words (surfing usa). also, again if memory serves me (it's been several years since i saw the movie) chuck berry went to prison (served 20 months) at the height of his career for transporting underage girls across state lines for immoral purposes. willie dixon also successfully sues led zeppelin. highly recommend the movie for anyone interested in rock and roll history.

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/li...-1963-20160608

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-h...louis-missouri

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cadillac_Records
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Last edited by alancw3; 03-19-2017 at 10:41 AM.
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  #17  
Old 03-19-2017, 08:41 AM
OtayBW OtayBW is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 93legendti View Post
That's a great line...I should start using that..


Chuck took from T Bone Walker. If you listen to T Bone and hear the shades of the Chuck Berry Riff, you know how creative Chuck was...
I don't often agree with my friend Adam, but on this, I definately agree. IMO, there would be no Chuck Berry as we knew him, or his influence on early rock and roll, without T-Bone Walker. Chuck not only adapted T-Bone's style and phrasing - especially including some of his signature licks (e.g., staccato note bends) - but he also took his stagecraft. When I listen to Chuck Berry, I'm hearing T-Bone.
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  #18  
Old 03-19-2017, 08:54 AM
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paredown paredown is offline
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He used to tour with just himself and his gear, and perform with pick-up musicians whenever he performed--the story is told in the Taylor Hackford film--in part because of his legendary desire to control his music and based on his legendary frugality. And he could do it because everywhere he traveled he could get a pick-up band together that knew his songs.

Keith Richards did the Hackford movie (as he says) because he wanted to give him a chance to play with really good musicians for a change.

A story I heard (I don't think it is from the movie, but I am getting older)--he played one night with a pickup band after a dinner heavy on the beans. Well the front guy has to signal changes etc, and one of the Chuck Berry signals was a pickup of one foot... Well it seems that the foot was being picked up for other reasons as the beans took effect, which meant that the backup band had a little trouble keeping it together. Or so the story goes...

Absolutely everyone that I know that picked up a guitar could play the opening riff from 'Johnny be Good' (as legend has it, Michael J Fox-who was another garage band kid from Burnaby like me played his own version in Back to the Future...) and the sound was there in everyone's head. I still remember the night when some fairly drunk 'middle aged' guy wandered out of a bar ~1970 and got the busker kids to start playing old-time rock and roll, and this dude belting out the Chuck Berry songs--must have played in a band in the late '50s/early '60s because he was good--and it turned into one of those great moments of street theater with the hippy kids and the old-timers jiving like they were on Dance Party...

Chuck, you will be missed....

Last edited by paredown; 03-19-2017 at 09:04 AM.
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  #19  
Old 03-19-2017, 09:00 AM
OtayBW OtayBW is online now
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Originally Posted by paredown View Post
Absolutely everyone that I know that picked up a guitar could play the opening riff from 'Johnny be Good' (as legend has it, Michael J Fox-who was another garage band kid from Burnaby like me) played his own version in Back to the Future...) and the sound was there in everyone's head.
That is T-Bone '101'.....IMO.....
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  #20  
Old 03-19-2017, 09:01 AM
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paredown paredown is offline
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Originally Posted by OtayBW View Post
I don't often agree with my friend Adam, but on this, I definately agree. IMO, there would be no Chuck Berry as we knew him, or his influence on early rock and roll, without T-Bone Walker. Chuck not only adapted T-Bone's style and phrasing - especially including some of his signature licks (e.g., staccato note bends) - but he also took his stagecraft. When I listen to Chuck Berry, I'm hearing T-Bone.
Agreed. And the Taylor Hackford film is very good on how much he borrowed from his piano man, Johnnie Johnson--which explains some of the unusual voicings of Chuck's guitar...

But where he went with the sound--that was a different thing.

I was reading the obit in the Times--it was news to me that it is Willie Dixon playing the bass on Maybellene--and it is that driving bass line that makes that song. (I saw Willie touring with the All-Stars years later and had no idea that he was there at the beginning of Rock and Roll...)

Last edited by paredown; 03-19-2017 at 09:11 AM.
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  #21  
Old 03-19-2017, 10:08 AM
enr1co enr1co is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 93legendti View Post
That's a great line...I should start using that..


Chuck took from T Bone Walker. If you listen to T Bone and hear the shades of the Chuck Berry Riff, you know how creative Chuck was...
No denying T Bone Walkers greatness, innovation, and influence to the playing of B.B., Berry and a host of other great players

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...oryId=96761445

but gotta love Keith Richards quote "Chuck had the swing. There's rock, but it's the roll that counts."

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/li...-songs-w472713

Last edited by enr1co; 03-19-2017 at 10:11 AM.
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  #22  
Old 03-19-2017, 11:10 AM
bironi bironi is offline
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I saw him at the Seattle Pop Festival in 1969. There were 25 bands playing over two days. Led Zeppelin, the Doors, Santana.......... I enjoyed Chuck Berry and Ike and Tina Turner the most. He was a great live entertainer.
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  #23  
Old 03-19-2017, 05:47 PM
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I think it was George Thorogood who, when asked why he never wrote any of his own songs, replied, 'why should I - Chuck Berry already wrote 'em all'. Of the two major founders of rock 'n roll, Elvis was a kind hell performer, but Chuck Berry came close on that measure and was also an incredible songwriter and guitarist, which Elvis wasn't in either case.

In that I have no particular place to go, I think I'll stream some Chuck...

RIP sir. Can't be too torn up when a rock star dies at home at age 90, but kind of sad nonetheless...

-Ray
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  #24  
Old 03-19-2017, 05:54 PM
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fiamme red fiamme red is offline
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http://www.nydailynews.com/entertain...icle-1.3002342

Quote:
To the question, “What's rock 'n' roll?”, there remains no better answer than a blue label 45 rpm Chess record by Mr. Chuck Berry. Long as we got a dime, his music won't never stop.
Phil Chess died a few months ago at 95: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/20/a...hess-dead.html.

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  #25  
Old 03-19-2017, 11:38 PM
91Bear 91Bear is offline
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Originally Posted by verbs4us View Post
One way to honor Mr. Berry, with a joke I heard years ago.
Just to make it a little more accurate:
In 1977, when NASA shot the Voyager satellites into space, they contained a plaque depicting humans and the position of earth in the solar system. Also on board was a golden record containing 116 images and a variety of natural sounds, such as those made by surf, wind, thunder and animals (including the songs of birds and whales). There were also musical selections , featuring artists such as Bach interpreted by Glenn Gould, Mozart, Beethoven, Stravinsky, Azerbaijani folk music by oboe player Kamil Jalilov, Guan Pinghu, Blind Willie Johnson, Chuck Berry, Kesarbai Kerkar and Valya Balkanska Years later, radio astronomers received a faint signal from beyond the solar system, at the fringe of our galaxy. They rushed to decode it, but the signal was so weak it took them weeks to amplify it and begin translation. Finally, they pieced together the message, and held a massive press conference to announce our first contact with extraterrestrial life. Everyone wanted to know what the message was. "It's very simple," said a NASA scientist, "It reads: 'Send more Chuck Berry.'"
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  #26  
Old 03-20-2017, 09:32 AM
jlwdm jlwdm is offline
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I just listened to Johnny B. Goode by Peter Tosh. It is one of my favorite versions.

Jeff
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  #27  
Old 03-20-2017, 10:06 AM
buldogge buldogge is offline
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Chuck still played shows @ Blueberry Hill once a year, or so...always packed, of course. The room he played in is called the "Duck Room".

There has been a recent push to save his boyhood home in The Ville (once a proud working class black neighborhood, now very rough).

Here's a pic of fans starting to leave memorials near his statue, in The Delmar Loop, very near to Blueberry Hill and my shop.

There was actually a street band playing at the statue when folks got the news of Chuck's passing...they broke into a memorial song...there's some video out there, also by David Carson, the photog of this photo.

-Mark in St. Louis
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  #28  
Old 03-20-2017, 10:20 AM
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FlashUNC FlashUNC is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 93legendti View Post
That's a great line...I should start using that..


Chuck took from T Bone Walker. If you listen to T Bone and hear the shades of the Chuck Berry Riff, you know how creative Chuck was...
And Jimmy Page was totally uncreative because he sounded just like Link Wray, just with a bigger Marshall stack at a higher tempo.

C'mon man....
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  #29  
Old 03-20-2017, 10:49 AM
benb benb is online now
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Originally Posted by FlashUNC View Post
And Jimmy Page was totally uncreative because he sounded just like Link Wray, just with a bigger Marshall stack at a higher tempo.

C'mon man....
LOL...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLEUSn8y9TI

RIP Chuck
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  #30  
Old 03-20-2017, 11:17 AM
93legendti 93legendti is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlashUNC View Post
And Jimmy Page was totally uncreative because he sounded just like Link Wray, just with a bigger Marshall stack at a higher tempo.

C'mon man....
C'mon yourself. I posted that Chuck was "creative" - he took one tiny idea and turned it into a style of music. That's called a "compliment".

Every creative guitarist borrowed from the last generation and expanded and improved upon it. Smart people know that. T Bone, Chuck, Albert King, Jimi, SRV... The lines are traceable.

Just because you don't like my politics, doesn't mean you have to disagree with everything I post...

Have a great day.
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